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California General Prison Talk Topics & Discussions relating to Prison & the Criminal Justice System in California that do not fit into any other California subforum.

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Old 12-26-2004, 03:16 PM
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Lightbulb The CA CDCR Handbook For Family and Friends of Inmates

Welcome to PTO’s CA Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation Handbook for Family and Friends of Inmates. Here you will find comprehensive answers to many of the questions you may have regarding the incarceration of your loved one. I’ve separated the categories to assist those that are new to the system, those that are seeking general information that applies to all inmates, the Division of Juvenile Justice and areas regarding Law, News and History.

Ideas, Suggestions and Comments

Reception Inmates Information:

Bridging Education Program

Locating an inmate in a California Prison

Intake/Reception/Classification/Orientation

Items you can mail to a Reception Center Inmate and Money Orders

Inmate Classification and Facility Placement by Level

What It’s Like In Reception an Inmates Perspective

Writing an Inmate/Mailing Addresses/Phone Contact/Public Information Officer

General Information for all inmates:

Calculating Release Dates and Time Credits

Collect Phone Calls From Inmates and MCI/PCO Procedures

Correctional Officers/Grades/Roles/Responsibilites

Community Resource Directory (Varoius Resources For Inmates and Families)

Facility Yard Levels/Degrees of Custody/Designation

Family Visits/Procedure/Rules/Minor Participation/Eligibility

General Mail Regulations

Inmate Canteen Purchases

Inmate Quarterly and Special Purchase Packages/Books and Magazines/Privilege Groups

Inmate Marriages/Procedure/Policy/Eligibility

Visitor Application Procedure/Visiting with Minors/Emergency Visits

Visiting Procedures and Policies

Visitor Attire and Prohibited Attire

Visiting, Items Allowed/Prohibited

Facilities Information:

California Department of Corrections

California Department of Corrections Facilities List

Community Correctional Facilities

State Correctional Conservation Camps

Law & Regulations Section:

California Penal Code and Vehicle Code

Pending Legislation Affecting Inmates

Title 15 Directors Rule/Pending Changes/Adopted Changes

Three Strikes and You're Out, Explained and Defined

CDCR Division of Juvenile Justice (Formerly CYA)

Division of Juvenile Justice

Locating Wards of the Div. of Juvenile Justice

DJJ Facilities List

FAQ's about the DJJ and Visiting DJJ Facilities

History of the California Youth Authority

DJJ Ombudsmans Office

Parole Information:

California Parolee Handbook

State of California Parole Units List

Current Parole Hearings Schedule (PDF)

History and Links of Interest:

History of the California Prison System

Locating inmates and Information for your County Sheriff's

Pictures From Inside California's Prisons(PDF File)

Office of The Prison Ombudsman

CDCR Press Releases

Federal Prison Information:

Federal Facilities Located in California

Locating Inmates In Federal Prisons

Last edited by RPinSD; 01-18-2006 at 03:12 PM.. Reason: Updated Div of Juvenile Justice Section
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Old 12-26-2004, 03:17 PM
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History of the California Prison System


California established its prison system in 1851 in response to an influx of criminal activity during the Gold Rush Years. The first prison was San Quentin, which opened in 1854. It was built entirely using inmate labor from the Waban a temporary prison that was actually a ship harbored off the coast of Point San Quentin. Construction began in 1852 and San Quentin received its first inmates in 1854. San Quentin Prison still remains one of the most notorious and recognizable prisons in the world next to Alcatraz Federal Prison. Until 1934 San Quentin housed both male and female offenders. San Quentin State Prison was named after its location on Point Quentin, which was the name of a Local Native American called Quintin who was either a notorious warrior or a notorious thief, depending on which historical account you believe. Federal mapmakers turned Quintin into the Americanized “Quentin” and replaced Point with “San” the Spanish word for saint. San Quentin State Prison is the only location in the California prison system that holds condemned male inmates and carries out executions. Currently there are 641 condemned inmates being held at San Quentin’s death row.

Next came Folsom State Prison which opened in 1880, its location was chosen for two primary reasons the availability of open land and its proximity to the American River. The Livermore Family had contracted with the State Prison Board to use inmate labor to build a second dam on the American River and that was completed in 1893 as a hydroelectric dam. The abundance of granite at and nearby the site of Folsom is responsible for it’s unique construction of primarily large blocks of granite. Folsom State Prison was named for the nearby Gold-Rush era town of Folsom. Capt. Joseph Folsom founded the town in 1855 he was a U.S. Army Officer that took part in military operations to win the California Territory away from Mexico. He later bought the huge Rancho Rio de los Americanos on which the town was built

California would not see the building of a new prison until 1933, when the California State Legislature authorized the construction of the California Correctional Institution, located in Tehachapi, CA. It was originally called the California Institution for Women a name, which was used to play down its penal purpose. It was occupied in 1933 as the sole institution to house women, with the exception of condemned female inmates housed on San Quentin’s death row. CCI was severely damaged by an earthquake in 1952, which caused many inmates to be housed in temporary camps on prison grounds. It was reopened in 1954 to house male felons and took its current name of California Correctional Institution.

Next came the California Institution for Men opened in 1941 in Chino, CA.
California Institution for Men was unique in the field of penology because it was known as the prison without walls. It was opened as and remains a level one facility housing first time offenders and those considered low risk to the community. The prisons progressive first warden, Kenyon Scudder wanted a name that was consistent with the prison’s mission of education and rehabilitation.

1946 saw the addition of the Correctional Training Facility, in Soledad, CA. It was utilized as a camp center and administered by San Quentin State Prison. The prison consists of 3 separate facilities, the South Facility built in 1946, the Central Facility built in 1951 and the North Facility built in 1958. Additional dormitories where added in 1984 and in 1996. It was designed to house medium custody inmates.


The 1950’s saw the addition of 4 new facilities in California, in Aug of 1952 The California Institution for Women in Corona, CA. opened. CIW housed all female inmates taken from the earthquake damaged California Correctional Institution in Tehachapi, CA. CIW is a multi level institution housing level 1, 2 and 3 inmates and the newer Ad-Seg unit. CIW also houses women with special needs such as pregnancy, psychiatric, substance abuse and those requiring special medical needs. CIW also provides pre-forestry and camp training. CIW’s name was carried from its former location in Tehachapi.

Next to open was the Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy, CA. Opened in 1953 it is located approximately 50 miles east of the San Francisco Bay Area. Its primary purpose is to provide vocational training for young male inmates. It now serves as the Northern California Reception Center, receiving newly incarcerated inmates from the northern counties for later placement within the system. Deuel Vocational Institution was named in honor of Charles H. Deuel, a state senator for Northern California. Deuel served on a special panel convened by Gov. Earl Warren in late 1943 to investigate corruption and mismanagement in the state’s prison system. He later carried the legislation that ultimately dismantled the old system and replaced it with the new Department of Corrections.


1954 California Men’s Colony opened in San Luis Obispo, CA located on the coast halfway between Los Angeles and the Bay Area. Its original West Facility was built to house level 1 and level 2 inmates. In 1961 the East Facility was completed and houses level 3 inmates. CMC’s closet neighbor is Cal Poly State University, the same year CMC opened, CPSU started admitting women. The ambiguous name was the CDC’s concession to local officials who feared having a prison neighboring a university. To give it even a lower profile, CMC has it’s own post office called Cuesta so mail sent to and from the prison will not carry a San Luis Obispo postmark.

1955 California Medical Facility was opened in Vacaville, CA. The primary purpose of CMF was to provide a centrally-located medical and psychiatric institution for the healthcare needs of the male felon population
in California Prisons. CMF Houses level 1, 2 & 3 inmates.

1962 California Rehabilitation Center, Norco, CA. Opened originally as a narcotics center. The building housing CRC was originally a luxury hotel built in 1928 in the 50’s it was converted to a Naval Medical Hospital, opening and closing several times. In 1962 it was donated to the State and operates as the only facility to house both men and women in separate facilities.

1963 California Correctional Center, Susanville, CA. CCC serves two purposes, to receive, train and house minimum level inmates for placement into the Northern California Conservation Camps. Its secondary purpose is to provide housing, education and jobs to those inmates not qualified for camps.

1965 Sierra Conservation Center, Jamestown, CA. SCC similar to CCC provides training to minimum and medium custody inmates for placement into local conservation camps and training in the art of fire suppression.

California’s Two Decades of Prison Population Explosion

California would not see the addition of a new prison facility for almost 19 years at the beginning of 1980 California housed 23,264 inmates between its 12 operating facilities and various conservation camps. California was on the fast track to becoming the largest prison industry state in the nation. From 1980 to 2000 California saw its inmate population increase 554% adding 137,391 newly convicted inmates for a total of 160,655 at the beginning of 2000. In twenty years California added 21 new facilities costing the state taxpayers billions in construction cost and billions in operations cost. Today the California Department of Corrections has an operating annual budget of 5.7 Billion dollars and a per inmate cost of $30,929. California now operates the third largest penal system in the world, second only to Chinas national correctional system and the United States national correctional system.

What fueled this massive increase in the inmate population is ten fold. California in the 1980’s and 1990’s created some of the harshest sentencing laws in the nation for virtually every offense imaginable. Invoking determinate sentencing guidelines and a new anti drug crusade California has the highest rate of drug offender incarcerations in the nation 134-per 100,000 people in the state. Today in the California Department of Corrections approximately 23,000 inmates are incarcerated solely for drug possession. This is the same amount of total inmates housed in California Prisons in the year 1980. With the passing of the 3 strikes law in the mid 1990’s California now has the largest number of inmates sentenced to life in prison of any state in the union.

Let The Building Begin!

Under the watch of Governors, Deukmejian (83-91) and Wilson (91-99) California set out on the most ambitious prison-building program ever seen. From 1984 starting with California State Prison in Solano, California brought a new prison facility into operation every two years for the next 18 years, 1987 saw 4 new prison openings. By 1990 the department operated a total of 22 Facilities and housed a total of 97,309 inmates. In the 1990’s 11 more prisons would be completed and by the year 2000 the state housed a total of 160,655 inmates in 33 facilities.

The Prisons of Two Governors!

1984- California State Prison Solano. Opened in August 1984 in Vacaville, CA. Close to the California Medical Facility. CSPS houses level 2 and 3 inmates and provides vocational, education and training programs. It also provides psychiatric healthcare needs for male felons in a designated “Crisis Bed Hub” institution. The name Solano reflects the county of its location.

1986- California State Prison, Sacramento. Opened October 1986 in Reprisa, CA. Originally named “New Folsom” CSPS was built adjacent to Folsom State Prison and was administered by the warden of Folsom. In 1992 its name was changed to CSP-Sacramento and was administered as a separate prison with it’s own warden. CSPS was the first prison built that contained an Ad-seg unit block and was used to house problematic inmates. It now contains a program support unit, a protective housing unit and houses level 1, 2 and 4 inmates.

1987- Avenal State Prison, Opened January 1987 in Avenal, CA. Originally called Kings County State Prison. It was the first All-New facility built in California in 20 years. Avenal was the first prison ever solicited by a local community. In 1988 it was renamed Avenal State Prison and houses level 2 inmates, Avenal also provides a 70-bed unit for inmates confined to wheelchairs. The unit was designed to allow easy access in and around the facility for these inmates. Avenal’s name is derived from its location in King’s County and the City of Avenal.

1987-Mule Creek State Prison, Opened June 1987 in Ione, CA. Named for it’s proximity to Mule Creek, MCSP was built to house level 1, 3 and 4 inmates. It operates a minimum custody support unit which aides in the support of facility operations.

1987- R.J. Donovan Correctional Facility at Rock Mountain. Opened July 1987 in San Diego, CA. Actually located in the Otay Mesa region 15 miles south of San Diego. It lies within a group of nearby county and federal facilities, and processes newly convicted inmates from San Diego, Orange and Imperial Counties. RJD houses level 1, 3 and Reception Inmates. RJD was named after Richard J. Donovan a National City Police Officer who served in the California Assembly in the 60’s where he pushed for a state prison in south San Diego County. The addition of Rock Mountain was humorous to local officials as the Mountain behind RJD is actually Otay Mesa Mountain Rock Mountain is a small hill nearby.

1987- Northern California Women’s Facility. Opened July 1987 in Stockton, CA. NCWF was opened to house level 1, 3 and reception center inmates. NCWF was deactivated at an unknown date and turned over to the California Youth Authority.

1988-California State Prison, Corcoran, Opened February 1988 in Corcoran, CA. Corcoran is home to such notable inmates as Charles Manson and Sirhhan Sirhhan, both serving life behind bars for their role in what are now infamous murders. The construction of CSPC saw the beginning of something new to the California Prison System, an entire facility that contained (SHU) Secured Housing Units. It sits amongst the other facilities that make up the entire complex and are noted, as being the most restrictive and highest Security level of incarceration an inmate will ever face. SHU cells measures 6 feet by 9 feet contain a solid structured bed, toilet/sink combo and a small writing surface. Inmates in SHU are locked down 23 hours a day 7 days a week. Corcoran also houses level 1, 3, 4, SHU and Protective Housing Unit inmates. Corcoran has the fifth highest operating budget of all state prisons and was named for its proximity to the city of Corcoran.

1988-Chuckawalla Valley State Prison, Opened December 1988 in Blyhte, CA, Chuckawalla is way out in the desert close to the border of Arizona. It houses level 1 and 2 inmates and has various vocational, educational and PIA programs. Chuckawalla Valley State Prison was named for its location in the Chuckwalla Valley, which in turn is the name of a species of desert lizard called a chuckwalla. The CDC added the extra “A” upon naming the prison.

1989-Pelican Bay State Prison, Opened December 1989 in Crescent City, CA. Right below the Oregon border and close to the ocean. Pelican Bay State Prison was built with one goal in mind, to house the state’s most notorious and dangerous inmate population at one location. PBSP is divided in two halves with uniquely different facilities on either side. One that houses maximum-security level general population inmates and the other is for (SHU) Secured Housing Unit maximum-security level inmates. PBSP also houses level 1 and 2 inmates. Level 1 inmates are housed in the (MSF) Minimum Support Facility, which is located outside of the secured perimeter fence. Pelican Bay State Prison was named for Pelican Bay, a long stretch of curving coastline that runs north from Crescent City. On a humorous note, its working name was Prison of the Redwoods. It was later abandoned since there is a college 80 miles south called “College of the Redwoods”

1990-Central California Women’s Facility, Opened October 1990 in Chowchilla, CA. CCWF is the largest all women’s correctional facility in the United States. It covers 640 acres and is the only prison in California to house condemned female inmates. CCWM also acts as a Reception Center for newly convicted inmates and houses level 1, 2, 3 and 4 inmates. It’s named for its location right in the middle of the state in the Salinas Valley.

1991-Wasco State Prison, Opened February 1991 in Wasco, CA. WSP was one of 2 identical prison/reception centers built in Kern County. The second facility is near the town of Delano. Wasco acts as a reception center for newly convicted inmates and also provides housing for level 1 and 3 inmates. Its name is derived from its proximity to the city of Wasco.

1992 Calipatria State Prison, Opened in January 1992 in Calipatria, CA. At 184 feet below sea level, Calipatria State Prison is at the lowest elevation of any prison in the Western Hemisphere. CSP was built to house level 1 and level 4 inmates in 2 separate facilities on one location. CSP offer numerous vocational, educational and PIA programs to inmates willing to participate. Calipatria was named for it’s proximity to the town of Calipatria and is located in Southern California in the desert near El Centro.

1993-California State Prison, Los Angeles County. Opened in February 1993, in Lancaster, CA. LAC is located northeast of the city of Los Angeles. Its purpose is to house inmates serving long terms of incarceration. It houses level 1 and level 4 inmates. California State Prison, Los Angeles County was the first and only State Prison built in Los Angeles County.

1993-North Kern State Prison, Opened in April of 1993, in Delano CA. NKSP also referred to as Delano State Prison, it is an exact replica of its neighboring prison, Wasco State Prison. NKSP acts as the Reception/Processing Center for newly incarcerated inmates from southern and some northern counties. NKSP Houses level 1, 3 and Reception Center inmates. It also operates an 8-bed level 1 firehouse. On October 7, 1994, the adult education facility was dedicated in the memory of Marie Keroack Romero, a prison teacher who was murdered at a California Youth Authority facility in 1975. Three hundred and sixty acres of NKSP property has been designated as protected wildlife habitat for the Blunt-Nosed Leopard lizard, San Joaquin kit fox, and the Tipton kangaroo Rat. North Kern State Prison is named for its location in northern Kern County.

1993-California State Prison, Centinela State Prison, Opened October 1993, in Imperial, CA. CEN’s primary purpose is to house inmates serving long term sentences of incarceration and houses level 1, 3, 4 and Ad Seg inmates. Centinela also has an Institutional Hearing Program (IHP), which prepares inmates who are illegal immigrants for release back to their native lands through the US Immigration and Naturalization Services. The institution originally referred to as California State Prison-Imperial South, was renamed Centinela State Prison by the Imperial County Board of Supervisors. Centinela State Prison was named for Mount Signal, the mountain located on the US Mexico international line once used to watch over the state's borders to prevent unauthorized passage into the US. Centinela is the Spanish word for "Sentinel" or signal.

1994-Ironwood State Prison, Opened February 1994 in Blythe, CA, Neighbor to Chuckawalla Valley State Prison
ISP houses level 1 and level 3 inmates, provides vocational and education programs. ISP also has the Institutional Hearing Program (IHP), which prepares inmates who are illegal immigrants for release to United States Immigration and Naturalization Service custody and the return to their native country. Ironwood State Prison's name was derived from the surrounding area’s native Ironwood trees.

1994-Pleasant Valley State Prison, Opened November 1994, in Coalinga, CA. PVSP provides long-term housing and services for minimum, medium and maximum custody inmates. PVSP provides Correctional Clinical Case Management System (CCCMS) mental health services. The Correctional Treatment Center provides diagnostic evaluation and treatment for inmates, including those in need of Mental Health Crisis Bed housing. Named for its location in the Pleasant Valley.

1995-Valley State Prison for Women, Opened April 1995 in Chowchilla, CA. Also know as Chowchilla State Prison VSPW has grown to be one of the largest women’s prisons in the world, now housing approximately 3,700 inmates. VSPW houses Level 1, 2, 3, 4, SHU and Reception Center Inmates. Its name is derived from its location in the Chowchilla Valley.

1995-High Desert State Prison, Opened August 1995 in Susanville, CA. HDSP houses mainly young male felons serving long sentences of incarceration. It also serves as a Reception Center for newly incarcerated inmates from the Northern Counties and houses level 1, 3 and 4 inmates. The first housing units to be activated were the minimum support facility and two Level III 270 ºdesign facilities. These were soon followed by the two Level IV 180 ºdesign facilities. In the spring of 1996, the 200-bed reception center was established. In May of 1997, one of the Level III 270 ºdesign facilities was converted to Level IV general population housing to accommodate departmental IV bed needs. Named High Desert State Prison by the Lassen County Board of Supervisors.

1996-Salinas Valley State Prison, Opened May 1996 in Soledad, CA. SVSP provides long-term housing and services for minimum and maximum custody male inmates. SVSP provides Correctional Clinical Case Management System (CCCMS) and Enhanced Outpatient Program (EOP) mental health services. The Intermediate Care Inpatient Mental Health Treatment Facility is referred to as the Salinas Valley Psychiatric Program (SVPP). The SVPP is an intermediate care inpatient psychiatric program servicing primarily level IV high security inmates who have a major mental disorder that has diminished their ability to function within the prison environment. Salinas Valley State Prison was named for its location.

1997-California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison Corcoran, Opened August 1997 in Corcoran, CA. SATF the 2nd prison near the city of Corcoran. It provides for the control, care and treatment of those inmates committed to the California Department of Corrections by the courts. In conjunction with this mission, the prison will provide viable work and training programs for 100 percent of the general inmate population as well as provide a "therapeutic community" substance abuse treatment complex for 1,056 Level II inmates. The administrative segregation portion of this prison will provide safe and secure facilities to house the inmate population who through their prior actions have proven to be a threat to the security of the institution and/or the safety of staff or other inmates. SATF houses level 2, 3, 4, SATF and (CTC) Correctional Training Center Inmates. California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison Corcoran was named for it’s intended mission and its location near the city of Corcoran.

2005-Kern Valley State Prison, Opened June 15 2005. It's working name was Delano II. KVSP is a Level I and Level IV Prison and contains some SHU and PHU Housing. The Level I MSF Yard will house the permanent work crews that provide support for the facility. The Level I MSF Yard is located outside the secured perimiter fence and is the first yard to be activated on June 15, 2005. The CDC will slowly activate the entire facility yard by yard over a period of several months, where it is expected to be at full capacity of 5500 inmates by January of 2006

Proposed: CDC proposes to construct a new condemned inmate complex (CIC) on approximately 40 acre site on the westerly side of the grounds San Quentin State Prison. The facility would be constructed in an area currently developed with minimum security, warehouse, and other support buildings. The CIC would include 1,028 cells capable of housing up to 1,408 condemned male inmates at maximum capacity. Facilities will be designed to provide maximum security and will be within a secured perimeter that includes a lethal electrified fence. Primary access to the site will be from the existing Main Gate in San Quentin Village.

Wait There’s More!

Community Correctional Facilities (CCFs) are operated by local governments for profit, under contract with the California Department of Corrections (CDC), with the primary goal being to alleviate the problem of crowding in state institutions by holding state prisoners in local facilities. We refer to these institutions as "public proprietary" facilities, since they are operating with the intent of profit making but they are owned (or leased) and managed by a local government, which receives the profits, made by its operation. Similar facilities are operated by private proprietary private companies for profit and are also under contract with state government. These 16 facilities currently hold 5844 inmates

Adelanto CCF, Baker CCF, Central Valley MCCF, Claremont Custody Center, Delano CCF, Desert View MCCF
Eagle Mountain CCF, Folsom CCF, Golden State MCCF, Lassen CCF, Leo Chesney Center, McFarland CCF
Mesa Verde CCF, Shafter CCF, Taft CCF and Victor Valley MCCF.

Let’s Go Camping

Remember when camping use to be fun? Not for these Boy’s and Girl’s. The California Department of Corrections, contracts with the California Department of Forestry to provide inmate labor. These camps are dotted throughout the state mainly in areas that have significant wildfire risks. It’s not easy work, not only are these inmates activated during wildfires, they spend a lot of their time clearing and cutting dead brushes and trees. Comprised mainly of level 1 and 2 inmates, because of the hard work and risks to personal safety. The California Department of Corrections awards the majority of the participants in conservation camps 2-day for 1-day credits. Allowing some inmates to serve only 35% of their sentence. Those on 85% time still only receive their 15% reduction to time served. The CDF is currently authorized to operate 41 Conservation Camps statewide that house nearly 4,000 inmates and wards. These camps are operated in conjunction with the California Department of Corrections (CDC) and the California Department of the Youth Authority (CYA). Through these cooperative efforts CDF is authorized to operate 198 fire crews year-round. These crews are available to respond to all types of emergencies including wildfires, floods, search and rescue, and earthquakes. When not responding to emergencies, the crews are busy with conservation and community service work projects for state, federal, and local government agencies. Fire crews perform several million hours of emergency response each year, and more on work projects. California Conservation Camps currently house 4186 inmate laborers.

Butte Fire Center (CCC), Alder (CDC), Eel River (CDC), High Rock (CDC), Antelope (CDC), Devils Garden (CDC), Intermountain (CDC), Susanville Inmate Training Center (CDC), Chamberlain Creek (CDC), Parlin Fork (CDC), Washington Ridge (CYA), Ben Lomond (CYA), Sugar Pine (CDC), Trinity River (CDC), Deadwood (CDC), Konocti (CDC), Delta (CDC), Ishi (CDC), Salt Creek (CDC), Valley View (CDC), Growlersburg (CDC), Pine Grove (CYA), Mt. Bullion (CDC), Bauitista (CDC), Norco (CDC), Oak Glen (CDC), Gabilan (CDC), CIW Training Center, Fenner Canyon (CDC), Owens Valley (CDC), McCain Valley (CDC), Puerta La Cruz (CDC), Rainbow (CDC), La Cima (CDC), Cuesta (CDC), Ventura (CYA), Mountain Home Baseline (CDC), Sierra Center (CDC), Vallecito (CDC)

A Breakdown of Our Inmates

Males: 93%
Females: 7%
Parole Violators: 12%

Race: 29% White; 29% Black; 36% Hispanic; 6% other. Offense: 50% persons; 21% property; 21% drugs; 7% other. Lifers: 27,229 Lifers Without Possibility of Parole: 3,163 Condemned: 635 Average Reading Level: Seventh grade; Average Age: 36; Employed: 53.6%; Ineligible: 28.7%; Waiting List: 17.7%

Total Male Inmates in Reception Centers 20,781
Total Male Inmates in Level 1 Housing 19,157
Total Male Inmates in Level 2 Housing 34,629
Total Male Inmates in Level 3 Housing 33,914
Total Male Inmates in Level 4 Housing 21,278
Total Male Inmates in SHU/AD Seg. PHU 4103
Total Male Condemned Inmates 604

Total Male/Female Inmates in Camps 4186

Total Female Inmates in Reception Centers 1657
Total Female Inmates in institution* 7699 *CDC Figures do not provide housing level populations
Total Female Inmates in SHU 55
Total Female Condemned Inmates 15

Avg Sentence: 52.9 months; Avg Time Served: 26.1 months.
Commitment Rate: 444.9 per 100,000 California population.

Current total inmate population 164,171
Supervised Parole Population 113,333

Total California Department of Corrections Population 301,165

Terms and Acronyms

Level 1-Open Dormitories without a secure perimeter.
Level 2-Open Dormitories with secure perimeter.
Level 3- Individual cells, fenced perimeters and armed coverage
Level 4- Cells, fenced or walled perimeters, and electronic security. More staff and armed officers both inside and outside of the facility.
SHU-Security Housing Unit. The most secure area within a level 4 prison designed to provide maximum coverage.
RC-Reception Center. Provides short term housing to process, classify and evaluate incoming inmates.
Ad-Seg-Administrative segregation.
PSU- Protective Support Unit
PHU-Protective Housing Unit.


In Closing!

I put this together for informational purposes for my friends at PTO and spent hours researching information, websites and articles to comprise this little story. While every attempt was made to be as accurate as possible, it’s just not guaranteed. Sources for information included, California Department of Corrections, Center on Juvenile & Criminal Justice, California Department of Archives, San Diego Union Tribune, Associated Press and California Department of Forestry.





RPinSD

Last edited by RPinSD; 06-13-2005 at 01:13 PM.. Reason: Update Delano II opening
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Old 12-26-2004, 04:39 PM
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Default Visiting Procedures and Policies

The California Department of Corrections (CDC) Visiting Information Toll-Free Telephone Number is (800) 374-8474. This toll-free number will provide most visiting information for all CDC institutions in English or Spanish. Some regulations, visiting hours and days could vary from one institution to the other. This phone number will lead you to the information for each institution.

General Visiting Information

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR ALL VISITORS

Visitors entering CDC institutions/facilities are subject to a search of their person, vehicle and property to the degree necessary to ensure institution/facility security, and prevent the introduction of contraband. Visitors may leave the institution grounds rather than to submit to a search of their person, vehicle or property. However, refusal to submit to the search will result in the denial of visitation for that day. Visitors may not elect to leave the institution grounds rather than submit to a search when institution officials possess a court-ordered search warrant or the cause for a search warrant arises while the visitor is on institution grounds.

All visitors should be aware that CDC is prohibited from recognizing hostages for bargaining to effect an escape by inmates or for any other reasons(s). (All visitors should be aware that CDC does not negotiate for release of hostages to effect an escape or for any other reason(s).)The prison may be surrounded by an electric fence. To protect visitors, especially children, from being injured, visitors are cautioned to stay away from the perimeter fence line.

It is a crime to:
Assist an inmate to escape. Bring onto the grounds any weapon, firearm, ammunition, explosive device, tear gas, pepper-spray, alcohol or controlled substance, cameras and/or recording devices.* Take letters and/or written documents to or from an inmate.* Falsely identify yourself to gain admission to the institution. Enter without the permission of the Warden if you have previously been convicted of a felony.

TYPES OF VISITS

The following describes the different types of visits and their limitations. If the number of visitors on a particular day is especially high, visits may be terminated to allow all visitors the opportunity to use the visiting facilities.

Contact Visits

Contact Visits mean that visitors may visit with the inmate in the visiting room or in the visiting patio area. The number of visitors is limited to no more than five visitors per inmate, including children. No time limit is imposed on contact visits except when the visiting room reaches capacity; visits may be terminated to make room for other visitors as they arrive. The "first in, first out" rule is applied in this case.

Noncontact Visits

Noncontact Visits are conducted in non-contact booths. The number of visitors is limited to no more than three visitors, including children, for each inmate due to the limited space in the booths. Non-contact visits are limited to no more than two hours due to the number of booths available. Inmates on non-contact and orientation status will be scheduled for a maximum of two hours. Visitors arriving without an appointment will be subject to space available. Ability to visit is not guaranteed.

Family/Conjugal Visits

Eligible inmates may apply for family visits. These visits are in an apartment-type setting and are for up to 43 hours' duration. Family visits involve only the inmate's approved immediate family members. The inmate purchases food from the institution. The inmate and their family may review the different menus and make choices, which they purchase prior to the visit. Minors may not normally participate in a family visit without the presence of another adult member of the inmate's immediate family. Exceptions are made on a case-by case-basis.

Normal Visiting Schedules

Each institution/facility has established a visiting schedule, which provides a minimum of 12 visiting hours per week. Institution heads have developed an operational supplement to this section, which includes their respective visiting schedules as follows:

Visiting days:
Three Days: Friday through Sunday
Two Days: Saturday and Sunday
Any routine modification to visiting hours and/or days shall be posted in areas accessible to visiting participants at least two weeks prior to implementation. Inmates may visit only during non-work/training hours except as provided in CCR Section 3045.2.

Visiting On Five Major Holidays

The Department recognizes five major holidays that may or may not be on a regularly scheduled visiting day. The designated visiting holidays are:
New Year's Day
July 4 (Independence Day)
Labor Day
Thanksgiving Day
Christmas Day

Application Process

The inmate should send family members and friends an application (CDC Form 106) to visit. All adult visitors must complete the application and return it to the Visiting Sergeant by mail. The Visiting staff must approve the application before the family member may visit. This should take approximately 30 working days. The CDC Form106 must be filled out completely and accurately. Failure to provide all requested information might result in the request being either denied or delayed.

Adult Visitors

The inmate will let the each visitor know that they are approved. Any visitor approved at one institution shall be approved to visit the same inmate upon transfer to another institution. A visitor may be required to update the application after 12 months.

Children

Minors are only allowed to visit when they are accompanied by an approved visitor such as a parent, a court appointed legal guardian, or they have written, notarized permission to visit from the child's parent or legal guardian and a certified birth certificate or embossed abstract of birth. Notarized letters must have the notary stamp on the original document; it must not be stapled or attached as an amendment and must be updated each calendar year. Child victims are not allowed to visit any inmate convicted of sexual offense against the minor. To protect the minor, the adult visitor must provide identification for each child visitor to verify the child is not the victim.



Attorneys/Legal Representatives

An attorney of record or legal representative must make an appointment with the Institution Litigation Coordinator or with the Visiting Room personnel to interview an inmate.

Persons on Active Parole

It is a felony for a former inmate to be on the grounds of any prison for any reason without prior written approval from the warden of that institution. Parolees must have prior written approval from their parole supervisor and the warden of that institution, prior to coming on institutional grounds. Persons discharged from parole must provide proof of discharge along with the warden's written permission to visit.

Acceptable Identification:

A valid state driver's license with picture (not laminated)
A valid state Department of Motor Vehicles Identification Card with picture (not laminated)
A valid Armed Forces Identification Card
Identification Card issued by the United States Department of Justice Immigration and Naturalization Services
Valid Federal Passport with picture
Picture identification issued by the Mexican Consulate entitled Secretaria De Relations Exteriores, Servicio Exterior Mexicano, Certificado De Matricula Consular

Visitor Attire

It is recommended that visitors dress conservatively and with the following guidelines in mind. Inappropriate attire will be reason to deny a visit. Any alteration to clothing once a visitor is inside the visiting area will be grounds for terminating the visit.

Prohibited Attire:
Clothing which, in any combination of shades or types of material/fabric, resembles California State-issued inmate clothing, blue denim or chambray shirts and blue denim pants. Law enforcement or military-type forest green or camouflage patterned articles of clothing, including rain gear. Hats, wigs or hairpieces (except with prior written approval of the (Visiting Sergeant).
Clothing that exposes the breast/chest area, genital area, or buttocks.
Dresses, skirts, pants, and shorts exposing more than two inches above the knee, including slits. Sheer or transparent garments. Strapless or"spaghetti" straps. Clothing exposing the midriff area. Clothing or accessories displaying obscene or offensive language or drawings. Brassieres with metal underwires or any other detectable metal are not permitted.

Allowable items:
Identification Card.
One Handkerchief.
Tissue Pack. (Unopened)
Clear Change Purse.
$50 Per Adult, $20 per Minor - in Coin or One Dollar Bills Only.
Comb or Brush
Two Keys On A Ring with No Attachments.
10 Photographs.
One Infant Carrier.
Six Disposable Diapers.
Factory-Sealed Baby Wipes.
Two Baby Bottles of Pre-Mixed Formula/Milk/Juice Per Baby.
One Transparent Pacifier.
Two Jars of Factory Sealed Baby Food.
Baby Blanket.

If you require prescription medication you must leave the medication at the Processing Center. You will be escorted back to the processing center if you need to take your medicine. Nitroglycerin tablets and inhalers will be allowed in the visiting room. Nonprescription medicine is not permitted.

Prohibited Items:
Purses.
Food. All refreshments are to be purchased from the vending machines located in the visiting room. (Except Camps and Ranches.)
Chewing Gum.
Cameras.
Pagers.
Cell Phones.
Writing Materials or Books. (Unless approved prior to entering the Visiting Room.)

Search Requirements:

All visitors must successfully pass through a metal detector to enter the visiting area. Any items that may set off the metal detector (e.g., hairclips, hairpins, jewelry, belts, belt buckles, suspenders, shoes, etc.), should be removed before attempting to pass through the metal detector. If the visitor cannot successfully pass through the metal detector, the visitor is subject to delay or denial of visit.

Visitors who have implants or prosthetic devices must bring a notarized statement from their physician detailing the implant or device and its specific location in the body. Visitors with implanted or prosthetic devices, wheelchairs or other assistive devices may contact the Visiting Sergeant for information and/or special instructions.

The Secure 1000 "People Scanner" used at 11 institutions. This device is a contraband detection device that is currently being installed at most international airports by the U.S. Customs Department. The Secure 1000 People Scanner is a non-intrusive device that uses Iow level x-ray backscatter imaging to detect contraband hidden upon a person.

There is no known health risk to anyone. The x-ray exposure level is so minimal; it may be compared to standing underneath your home smoke alarm.

The Secure 1000 will enable the operator (of the same sex as the visitor) to detect such items as narcotics, money, weapons, and dangerous contraband that are hidden upon an individual.

The image of the individual being scanned is shown on a monitor that is placed in such a manner as to protect visitor privacy.

All visitors, except infants and children who are unable to walk, shall be processed through the Secure 1000 prior to being allowed access within the institution.

Infants and children unable to walk will normally not be required to process through the Secure 1000, but will be subject to processing with the detector wand.

A visitor whose image indicates an unknown or foreign object will be subject to a "localized" unclothed body search. The search shall be conducted in a professional manner that will moderate the embarrassment or indignity to the person being searched. The search will be conducted and observed by a staff person and supervisor of the same sex.

Special Circumstances Visits

In general, inmates who have work assignments are allowed to visit only during their non-work hours. In some cases, however, an inmate may be approved to visit during his work hours for extraordinary circumstances. These special circumstances include:Excessive Distance: When a visitor must travel a distance of 250 miles or more and has not visited the inmate within the past 30 days. No more than one day is permitted for such a visit. Wedding: When an inmate marries, the inmate may (with prior approval from his work supervisor) have a visit on the wedding day.Disabled: When a visitor is disabled (as defined by California law) and must rely on special transportation to the institution, approval is required five working days prior to the visit. Family Emergency: When death, serious illness or injury occurs to an inmate's immediate family member, clergy persons, family member or close friends may visit thc inmate to offer condolences or to inform the inmate or the occurrence. The emergency must be verified prior to the approval of the "Emergency Visit." Infrequent Visits: When an inmate normally receives infrequent visits and a visitor unexpectedly arrives, a visit may be granted. "Infrequent visit" is defined as not more than one visitor every six months. Family Visits: An inmate participating in the Family Visiting Program may be permitted to visit in the regular visiting room at the conclusion of his family visit, but only during the regular visiting hours. Close Custody Counts: Inmates who due to either the length of their sentence or aberrant behavior are given the Close Custody level. All close custody inmates will remain in plain view of the visiting floor officer. Times at each institution or facility may vary; please contact the specific institution that you visit for specific Close Custody count hours.

Visiting Room Procedures

Each visitor and inmate is responsible for his or her own conduct while visiting. Violation of the rules and regulations may result in termination, restriction, suspension, or denial of visits. Additionally, disciplinary charges may be filed against the inmate. An inmate and his/her visitor(s) are allowed to embrace and kiss at the beginning and end of their visit. Holding hands on top of the table in plain view is permitted, with no other physical contact. Excessive contact, (kissing, massaging, stroking, and sitting with legs intertwined or sitting on laps) could result in termination of the visit. Inmates cannot receive any items, gifts, money, jewelry, or documents during a visit. However, the adult visitor may ask for a pencil and notebook paper as needed. Children are to remain under the direct supervision and control of the visiting parent or guardian at all times. Smoking is not allowed in the visiting rooms or outside patios in some institutions at any time.

Citizen's Complaint Process

If you have a problem concerning visiting, you should try to resolve it immediately. You should ask to speak with the Visiting Sergeant and or Visiting Lieutenant. Should the problem persist or you do not receive remedy, you may write the Warden with a description of the problem and what resolution you are requesting. You may write the Visiting Ombudsperson or the Director if you are complaining about an institutional policy and did not receive a satisfactory response. When you receive a written response from the Warden, please attach it to your letter to the Director. The Ombudsperson may be reached at (916)445-1748.

Last edited by PTO-79211; 06-05-2009 at 01:41 PM.. Reason: Update Visiting Information
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  #4  
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Default Locating an Inmate in California State Prisons

California Department of Corrections Inmate Locator Service

To locate an offender within the jurisdiction of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation you can call the Identification Unit at (916) 445-6713. You must provide the full name and the month, day and year of birth or CDC identification number for the subject of your inquiry. This unit can only provide you with the current location and CDC identification number for the offender. The Identification Unit does not have and will not provide any future release date information. This service is available only Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. excluding state holidays. You may also fax your inquiry to the Identification Unit at (916) 322-0500.

Please note that information for offenders recently admitted into or transferred between state prisons may not be available for 7 business days.
.

To Locate Inmate Housing Info When in Reception

The California Inmate locator Service will rarely be able provide you with your loved ones housing and bunk info. To obtain this call the facility that your loved one is at and ask or wait for the option and select Reception Records. They will provide you the housing unit, cell # and bunk. As with the Locator Service, you will need to provide the inmate's full name and either CDC# or date of birth.

Last edited by LeBeau; 12-12-2006 at 08:23 AM..
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Default Title 15 Director's Rule, Pending Changes, Adopted Changes

Title 15 is given to every inmate incarcerated in a California State Prison. It dictates the rules and regulations as they apply to The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation operations, personnel, inmate rights, rules and privlages

Title 15

Pending Changes to Title 15

Recently Adopted Changes to Title 15

Last edited by PTO-79211; 06-05-2009 at 01:46 PM.. Reason: Fixed Broken Links
  #6  
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Default Office of the Prison Ombudsman

The Office of the Ombudsman works directly for the Director as an independent entity- or special advisor- on sensitive issues that relate to a specific institution. The Ombudsman provides management advice and consultation to the Director and makes recommendations to resolve critical issues that impact departmental policies, procedures and programs applicable to specific institutions.

The Ombudsman serves as a key policy and public relations expert, with a focus on ethical decision-making, and has extensive contact with staff, inmates and their families, legislative bodies and community-based groups.

When contacting the Ombudsman’s Office, please provide the following information:
Your Name
Your Phone Number
Your Relationship to the Inmate
Name of the Inmate
CDC Number of the Inmate
Location of the Inmate
Brief Description of the Issue

Provide a brief overview of the results of efforts made by you and the inmate to resolve the issue.

Ken Hurdle
Lead Ombudsman
CSP Sacramento
mailto:Ken.Hurdle@cdcr.ca.gov
(916) 445-1748

Chris Weaver
High Desert State Prison
CCI Tehachapi
mailto:Chris.Weaver@cdcr.ca.gov
(916) 445-1769

Domingo Uribe
Salinas Valley State Prison
CTF Soledad
mailto: Domingo.Uribe@cdcr.ca.gov
(916) 324-5448

Duncan Fallon
Pelican Bay State Prison
Lancaster State Prison
mailto: Duncan.Fallon@cdcr.ca.gov
(916) 327-8446

Sara Malone
Women's Institutions
Solano State Prison
mailto:Sara.Malone@cdcr.ca.gov
(916) 327-8467

Lonnie Jackson
Corcoran State Prison
SATF-Corcoran
mailto:Lonnie.Jackson@cdcr.ca.gov
(916) 324-5458


CA CDCR Office Of The Ombudsman Home Page

Last edited by RPinSD; 01-18-2006 at 01:08 PM.. Reason: Corrected Link to CDCR and Updated E-Mail Addys
  #7  
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Default Locating an Inmate in a Federal Facility

To locate a inmate held in a Federal Facility, The Federal Bureau of Prison has an inmate locator on their main website. You can search current and released inmates.


BOP Inmate Locator

Last edited by RPinSD; 03-01-2005 at 11:27 PM..
  #8  
Old 12-27-2004, 02:21 PM
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Default Federal Facilities Located in California

For Inmates in a Federal Facility, Facility names, addresses and phone #

CCM - Community Corrections Management Center; FCC - Federal Correctional Complex; FCI - Federal Correctional Institution; FDC - Federal Detention Center; FMC - Federal Medical Center; FPC - Federal Prison Camp; FTC - Federal Transfer Center; MCC - Metropolitan Correctional Center; MCFP - Medical Center for Federal Prisoners; MDC - Metropolitan Detention Center; USP - U.S. Penitentiary.

USP Atwater
P.O. Box 019000
#1 Federal Way
Atwater, CA 95301
209-386-0257
Fax: 209-386-4719
Security Level: High/Male (adjacent Minimum/Male camp)
Facility Code: ATW

Inmate Mail: P.O. Box 019001
Atwater, CA 95301

FCI Dublin
5701 8th Street, Camp Parks
Dublin, California 94568
925-833-7500
Fax: 925-833-7599
Security Level: Low/Female and Administrative/Male (adjacent Minimum/Female camp)
Facility Code: DUB

FCI Lompoc
3600 Guard Road
Lompoc, California 93436
805-736-4154
Fax: 805-736-7163
Security Level: Low/Male (adjacent Intensive Confinement Center)
Facility Code: LOF

USP Lompoc
3901 Klein Boulevard
Lompoc, California 93436
805-735-2771
Fax: 805-737-0295
Security Level: High/Male (adjacent Minimum/Male camp)
Facility Code: LOM

MDC Los Angeles
535 N. Alameda Street
Los Angeles, California 90012
213-485-0439
Fax: 213-626-5801
Security Level: Administrative/Male/Female
Facility Code: LOS

MCC San Diego
808 Union Street
San Diego, California 92101-6078
619-232-4311
Fax: 619-595-0390
Security Level: Administrative/Male/Female
Facility Code: SDC

FCI Terminal Island
1299 Seaside Avenue, Reservation Point
Terminal Island, California 90731-0207
310-831-8961
Fax: 310-732-5335
Security Level: Medium/Male
Facility Code: TRM

FCI Victorville
P.O. Box 5400
Adelanto, CA 92301
760-246-2400
Fax: 760-246-2621
Security Level: Medium/Male (adjacent Minimum/Female camp)
Facility Code: VIM

Inmate mailing address:
P.O. Box 5300
Adelanto, CA 92301

Contract Facilities

California City Correctional Center
22844 Virginia Blvd.
California City, CA 93504
760-373-1764
Fax: 760-373-3529
Security Level: Low/Male - Sentenced/Non-U.S. Citizens
Facility Code: CAL

Taft Correctional Institution
1500 Cadet Road
Taft, CA 93268
661-763-2510
Fax: 661-765-3034
Security Level: Male - Low and Minimum security
Facility Code: TAF

Last edited by RPinSD; 03-23-2005 at 03:30 PM..
  #9  
Old 12-27-2004, 04:09 PM
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Default Inmate Classification and Facility Placement by Level

A classification score quantifies each inmate’s supervision needs based on the inmate’s background (e.g., age) and current offense (e.g., sentence length). The score is computed soon after arrival at the CDC Reception Center, and is essentially a linear combination of about a dozen items. For about 75% of the inmates, placement in one of four security levels is determined by whether a score falls within certain ranges. For example, a score of less than 18 typically leads to placement in one of the lowest security level facilities (i.e., a “Level I” facility). A score greater than 52 typically leads to placement in one of the highest security level facilities (i.e., a “Level IV” facility).

Except as provided in section 3375.2, each inmate shall be assigned to
a facility with a security level, which corresponds, to the following
placement score ranges:

(1) An inmate with a placement score of 0 through 18 shall be placed in a
Level I facility.
(2) An inmate with a placement score of 19 through 27 shall be placed in
a Level II facility.
(3) An inmate with a placement score of 28 through 51 shall be placed in
a Level III facility.
(4) An inmate with a placement score of 52 and above shall be placed in
a Level IV facility.

(b) An inmate approved for transfer to a sub facility of a complex may be
received and processed through a facility with a security level higher than
that which is consistent with the inmate's placement score. Such cases
shall be transferred to the sub facility when bed space allows or, when
appropriate, recommended for an administrative determinant, which
prohibits movement to the lower security level facility.
(1) The case shall be presented to a CSR for evaluation within 30 days of
receipt at the facility unless the inmate is on an approved waiting list
maintained by the complex for placement of inmates at the approved
sub facility.
(2) The transfer of an inmate for more than 30 days from one sub facility
of a complex to another sub facility, which has a different security level,
shall require a classification staff representative (CSR) endorsement
When the sub facility’s security level is consistent with the inmate's
placement score, the classification and parole representative may act as a
CSR

Last edited by RPinSD; 03-01-2005 at 11:29 PM..
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Old 12-28-2004, 05:12 PM
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Default Conservation Camps Address and Telephone #s

California Department of Forestry, in collaboration with the California Department of Corrections and California Youth Authority, operates 40 conservation camps located throughout the state.


Butte Fire Center (CCC)
6640 Steifer Road
Magalia, CA 95954
530-873-0330

Alder (CDC)
PO Box 905
Klamath, CA 95548
707-482-2761

Sugar Pine (CDC)
15905 Sugar Pine Camp Road
Bella Vista, CA 96008
530-472-3121

Eel River (CDC)
PO Box 528
Redway, CA 95560
707-923-2757

Trinity River (CDC)
P.O. Box 639
Lewiston, CA 96052
530-286-2880 , 530-286-2885

Deadwood (CDC)
17140 McAdams Creek Road
Fort Jones, CA 96032
530-468-2235

High Rock (CDC)
PO Box 176
Weott, CA 95571
707-946-2362

Konocti (CDC)
13044 State Highway 29
Lower Lake, CA 95457
707-994-2441

Delta (CDC)
6246 Lambie Road
Suisun City, CA 95585
707-428-4461

Antelope (CDC)
711-045 Center Road
PO Box 908
Susanville, CA 96130
530-257-2295

Ishi (CDC)
Star Route 3 Box 50
Paynes Creek, CA 96075
530-597-2352

Salt Creek (CDC)
PO Box 468
Paskenta, CA 96074
530-833-5562

Devils Garden (CDC)
Crowder Flat Road
PO Box 100
Alturas, CA 96101
530-233-3634

Valley View (CDC)
PO Box 27
Elk Creek, CA 95939
530-968-5355

Growlersburg (CDC)
15440 Longview Lane
PO Box 188
Georgetown, CA 95634
530-333-4385

Intermountain (CDC)
22 Foothill Road
PO Box 68
Bieber, CA 96009
530-294-5289

Pine Grove (CYA)
13630 Aqueduct-Volcano Road
PO Box 405
Pine Grove, CA 95665
209-296-7591

Mt Bullion (CDC)
5730 Mt. Bullion Access Road
Mariposa, CA, 95338
209-966-2116

Susanville Inmate Training Center
711-045 Center Road
PO Box M
Susanville, CA 96130
530-257-2727

Bautista (CDC)
33015 Bautista Road
Hemet, CA 92554-8514
951-927-3639

Chamberlain Creek (CDC)
15800 Highway 20
Fort Bragg, CA 95437
707-964-3716

Norco (CDC)
Western & Pine Bldg. 314 Box 279
Norco, CA 91760
951-737-5911

Oak Glen (CDC)
41100 Pine Bench Road
Yucaipa, CA 92399
951-797-5418

Parlin Fork (CDC)
23000 Highway 20
Fort Bragg, CA 95437
707-964-3765

Gabilan (CDC)
Route 1 Box 103
Soledad, CA 93960
831-678-0609

CIW Training Center
P.O. Box 2018
Chino, CA 91708
909-597-7137

Washington Ridge (CYA)
11425 Conservation Camp Road
Nevada City, CA 95959
530-265-7855

Fenner Canyon (CDC)
25900 Big Rock Road
Valyermo, CA 93563
661-944-5086

Ben Lomond (CYA)
13575 Empire Grade Road
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
831-426-1610

Owens Valley (CDC)
Route 2 Box 22L
Bishop, CA 93514
760-387-2565

McCain Valley (CDC)
2550 McCain Valley Road
Boulevard, CA 91905
619-766-4412

Rainbow (CDC)
8215 Rainbow Heights Rd.
Fallbrook, CA 92028
760-728-7492

La Cima (CDC)
15108 Sunrise Highway
Julian, CA 92036
760-765-0140

Cuesta (CDC)
Route 2, Box 427
San Joaquin Bldg 962
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401
805-543-9570

Ventura (CYA)
2800 Wright
Camarillo, CA 93010
808-984-4754

Mountain Home
45260 Bear Creek Road
Springville, CA 93265
559-539-3151

Baseline (CDC)
16809 New Peoria Flat Rd
Jamestown, CA 95327
209-984-5287

Sierra Center (CDC)
PO Box 637
Jamestown, CA 95327
209-984-4754

Vallecito (CDC)
3225 Six Mile Road
PO Box 7
Angels Camp, CA 95222
209-736-5291
209-984-5291 Ext. 5321

Last edited by RPinSD; 01-18-2006 at 12:49 PM.. Reason: Updated Links to CDCR and DJJ
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Old 12-28-2004, 06:00 PM
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Default Your Counties Sheriff's Office

Links to County Sheriff's Department. Some Counties provide Inamte Locator Services and access to Court Records and Calendars.


Alameda County Sheriffs Department
Alpine County Sheriffs Department
Amador County Sheriffs Department
Butte County Sheriffs Department
Calaveras County Sheriffs Department
Colusa County Sheriffs Department
Contra Costa County Sheriffs Department
Del Norte County Sheriffs Department
El Dorado County Sheirffs Department
Fresno County Sheirffs Department
Glen County Sheirffs Department
Humboldt County Sheriffs Department
Imperial County Sheriffs Department
Inyo County Sheriffs Department
Kern County Sheriffs Department
Kings County Sheriffs Department
Lake County Sheriffs Department
Lassen County Sheriffs Department
Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department
Madera County Sheriffs Department
Marin County Sheriffs Department
Mariposa County Sheriffs Department
Mendicino County Sheriffs Department
Merced County Sheriffs Department
Modoc County Sheriffs Department
No Website, Call (530) 233-4416
Mono County Sheriffs Department
Monterey County Sheriffs Department
Napa County Sheriffs Department
Nevada County Sheriffs Department
Orange County Sheriffs Department
Placer County Sheriffs Department
Plumas County Sheriffs Department
Riverside County Sheriffs Department
Sacramento County Sheriffs Department
San Benito County Sheriffs Department
San Bernardino County Sheriffs Department
San Diego County Sheriffs Department
San Francisco County Sheriffs Department
San Joaquin County Sheriffs Department
San Luis Obispo County Sheriffs Department
San Mateo County Sheriffs Department
Santa Barbara County Sheriffs Department
Santa Clara County Sheriffs Department
Santa Cruz County Sheriffs Department
Shasta County Sheriffs Department
Sierra County Sheriffs Department
Siskiyou County Sheriffs Department
Solano County Sheriffs Department
Sonoma County Sheriffs Department
Stanislaus County Sheriffs Department
Sutter County Sheriffs Department
Tehama County Sheriffs Department
Trinity County Sheriffs Department
Tulare County Sheriffs Department
Tuolumne County Sheriffs Department
Ventura County Sheriffs Department
Yolo County Sheriffs Department
Yuba County Sheriffs Department

Last edited by RPinSD; 01-19-2005 at 05:03 PM..
  #12  
Old 12-29-2004, 01:27 PM
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Default California Penal Code, Vehicle Code and Sentencing

While reading and the interpretation of the Penal Code and Vehicle Code can be a daunting task. It’s also a wealth of information for those with pending charges or in the courts.

California in the late 1970’s adopted determinate sentencing to provide for uniformity in the sentencing of those convicted of a felony or misdemeanor crime. When convicted the Judge has three options for terms of imprisonment and in some cases an option for probation. Referred to as low, mid and upper terms, they are known as the “mean sentence”. If your “mean sentence” were 4 years for a non-violent, 1st time offense, the application of credits allowed under other provisions of the penal code, would adjust your real sentence of incarceration to be 50% or 85% of your “mean sentence”.


Judges may no longer impose the upper term of sentencing to convicted felons, unless the trial was conducted with a sitting jury. (Bailey vs. U.S. 2003)

Portion of Sections 1170-1170.9 In any case in which the punishment prescribed by statute fora person convicted of a public offense is a term of imprisonment in the state prison of any specification of three time periods, the court shall sentence the defendant to one of the terms of imprisonment specified unless the convicted person is given any other disposition provided by law, including a fine, jail, probation, or the suspension of imposition or execution of sentence or is sentenced pursuant to subdivision

California Penal Code


California Vehicle Code

Last edited by RPinSD; 05-05-2005 at 03:13 PM..
  #13  
Old 12-29-2004, 08:09 PM
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Default Visitor Attire/Prohibited Attire

Allthough provided in General Visiting, this is a quick link.


Visitor Attire

It is recommended that visitors dress conservatively and with the following guidelines in mind. Inappropriate attire will be reason to deny a visit. Any alteration to clothing once a visitor is inside the visiting area will be grounds for terminating the visit.

Prohibited Attire:
Clothing which, in any combination of shades or types of material/fabric, resembles California State-issued inmate clothing, blue denim or chambray shirts and blue denim pants. Law enforcement or military-type forest green or camouflage patterned articles of clothing, including rain gear. Hats, wigs or hairpieces (except with prior written approval of the (Visiting Sergeant).
Clothing that exposes the breast/chest area, genital area, or buttocks.
Dresses, skirts, pants, and shorts exposing more than two inches above the knee, including slits. Sheer or transparent garments. Strapless or"spaghetti" straps. Clothing exposing the midriff area. Clothing or accessories displaying obscene or offensive language or drawings. Brassieres with metal underwires or any other detectable metal are not permitted.

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  #14  
Old 12-29-2004, 08:19 PM
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Default Visiting Items Allowed/Prohibited

Allthough covered in general visiting policies, these are quick links. Items Allowed/Prohibited vary from facility. Some facilities do not allow cigarettes or car alarm key combos like those used by Volkswagen/Audi.

Allowable items:
Identification Card.
One Handkerchief.
Tissue Pack. (Unopened)
Clear Change Purse.
Cigarettes, two unopened packs. (Only Patio Visits At Designated Institutions/Facilities.)
$30 Per Adult in Coin or One Dollar Bills Only.
Comb or Brush
Two Keys On A Ring with No Attachments.
10 Photographs.
One Infant Carrier.
Six Disposable Diapers.
Factory-Sealed Baby Wipes.
Two Baby Bottles of Pre-Mixed Formula/Milk/Juice Per Baby.
One Transparent Pacifier.
Two Jars of Factory Sealed Baby Food.
Baby Blanket.

If you require prescription medication you must leave the medication at the Processing Center. You will be escorted back to the processing center if you need to take your medicine. Nitroglycerin tablets and inhalers will be allowed in the visiting room. Nonprescription medicine is not permitted.

Prohibited Items:
Purses.
Food. All refreshments are to be purchased from the vending machines located in the visiting room. (Except Camps and Ranches.)
Chewing Gum.
Cameras.
Pagers.
Cell Phones.
Writing Materials or Books. (Unless approved prior to entering the Visiting Room.)

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  #15  
Old 12-29-2004, 08:29 PM
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Default General Mail Regulations

These are just some general mail guidelines. Each prison has an operating procedure for mail so some things may vary from prison to prison.

3138. General Mail Regulations.
(a) All nonconfidential inmate mail is subject to being read in its entirety
or in part by designated employees of the facility before it is mailed for or
delivered to an inmate. The institutional head or designee may reject mail
sent by or to an inmate as provided in section 3136.
(b) All incoming packages and mail addressed to an inmate shall be
opened and inspected before delivery to the inmate. The purpose of
inspection shall be to receive or receipt any funds enclosed for deposit to
the inmate's trust account; to verify and record the receipt of permitted
personal property; and to prevent the introduction of contraband.
(c) Outgoing inmate mail shall be inspected in accordance with local
procedures.
(1) All outgoing packages shall undergo inspection by appropriate
employees before the package is sealed and mailed.
(2) No collect-on-delivery packages or letters of any kind shall be
accepted for an inmate.
(d) Packages.
(1) Facilities will establish and make available to all inmates procedures
for the receipt of packages from their correspondents in accordance with
limits set for their assigned inmate work/training incentive group. Such
procedures may require an inmate to obtain prior approval to receive a
package. Facilities may refuse to accept packages addressed to an inmate
if prior approval has not been obtained, or if a package is received at a
facility, the facility may refuse to deliver the package to the inmate and
dispose of the package as provided in subsection 3147(a)(6) without the
need to hold the package pending appeal as provided in subsection
3147(a)(5)(B).
(2) Facilities will establish and make available to all inmates procedures
for shipping packages to their correspondents.
(e) Enclosed Funds. Funds may be mailed to an inmate by money orders,
certified or personal checks, or any other negotiable means except cash.
Funds received in the form of a personal check will not be released for
spending by the inmate until the check has cleared the named bank.
(f) Publications.
(1) Publications are reproduced, handwritten, typed/printed, and/or
pictorial materials including books, periodicals, newspapers, and
pamphlets. Inmates may subscribe to newspapers, periodicals, and 3138. General Mail Regulations.
(2) Publications must be addressed to an individual inmate except for
donations to the institution as otherwise permitted by these regulations and
local procedures.
(3) A publication received through the U.S. mail from the publisher or
bookstore shall be excluded for the reasons stated in section 3006(c).
(4) Nothing in this section shall be construed as limiting a facility's right
to inspect nonconfidential material and to limit the number of publications
an inmate may possess at one time.

Original Post From California Sunshine Thanks Girl!

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  #16  
Old 12-30-2004, 02:53 PM
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Default Community Correctional Facilities

For inmates located in a Community Correctional Facility, names, address's and phone #'s

Community Correctional Facilities are operated by Local Governments and Private Companies. Contracted by the California Department of Corrections, CCF’s house primarily low-level inmates with sentences shorter than 18 months, parole violators and those with scheduled release dates. Local communities utilize the inmates as work crews for many community projects and public property maintenance. To Locate a map of a facility see below.

Adelanto CCF
10400 Rancho Road
P. O. Box 5005 92301-0724
P. O. Box 5000 (Inmate Box)
Adelanto, CA 92301-0724
(760) 246-3328


Baker CCF
10 Lakeview Drive,
P. O. Box 560 92309
Baker, CA 92309
(760) 733-4356


Central Valley MCCF
254 Taylor Avenue
McFarland, CA 93250
(661) 792-3492


Claremont Custody Center
185 West Gale
Coalinga, CA 93210

(559) 935-0851

Delano CCF
2727 West Industry Way
P. O. Box 1060 93216
Delano, CA 93216
(661) 721-3270


Desert View MCCF
10450 Rancho Road
Adelanto, CA 92301-0724
(760) 246-7446


Golden State MCCF
611 Frontage Road
P. O. Box 1518
McFarland, CA 93250
(661) 792-2731


Lassen CCF
1405 Sheriff Cady Lane
Susanville, CA 96130
(530) 251-5245


Leo Chesney Center
2800 Apricot
P. O. Box 66
Live Oak, CA 95953
(530) 695-1846


McFarland CCF
120 Taylor Avenue
P. O. Box 637 93250-0637
McFarland, CA 93250
(661) 792-3001


Mesa Verde CCF
425 Golden State Avenue
Bakersfield, CA 93301
(661) 326-0411


Shafter CCF
1150 East Ash,
Shafter, CA 93263
(661) 746-8900


Taft CCF
330 Commerce Way
Taft, CA 93268
(661) 763-2850



Copy and Paste Address to Locate Facility via Mapquest

Last edited by William'sBaby; 01-13-2007 at 02:36 PM..
  #17  
Old 01-04-2005, 05:51 PM
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Default Facility Yard Levels/Degrees of Custody/Designation

Institution Level By Yard

(Not All Facilties are Listed)

California Correctional Center
Lassen Unit III
Sierra Unit II
Cascade Unit I
Outside Modules I
Camps I
Sierra Concervation Center
Tuolumne Unit III
Mariposa Unit II
Calaveras Unit I
Camps I
California Correctional Institution
Unit IV-A IV
Unit IV-B IV
Unit III-Reception Center (for work crew only) III
Unit II II
Unit I I
Camp (Cummings Valley) I
Correctional Training Facility
Central III
North III
South I
Deuel Vocational Institution
Level III
Minimum (Satellite) I
Folsom State Prison
Minimum I
Minimum Unit I
California State Prison, Sacramento
Facility A IV
Facility B IV
Facility C IV
California Institution For Men
Main I
Reception Center-Central (For Work Crew Only) III
Reception Center-West (For Work Crew Only) II
East III
California Men’s Colony
East III
West I/II/IV I/II
III Camp (Cuesta) I
California Institution for Women
Levels III/IV
San Quentin
Main II
Modulars II
Minimum I
California Medical Facility
Main II/III
Northern Reception Center (For Work Crew Only) I
Minimum (Satellite Dorm) I
California State Prison, Solano
Level III Complex III
Facility I III
Facility II III
Level II Complex II
Facility III II
Facility IV II
California Rehabilitation Center
Level II
Camp (Norco) I
Avenal State Prison
Facility 1 II
Facility 2 II
Facility 3 II
Facility 4 II
Facility 5 II
Facility 6 II
RJ Donovan Facility
Facility 1 III
Facility 2 III
Facility 3 III
Facility 4 III
Minimum Unit I
Mule Creek State Prison
Facility A III
Facility B III
Facility C III
Minimum Unit I
Chuckawalla State Prison
Facility A II
Facility B II
Facility C II
Facility D II
Pelican Bay State Prsion
Facility A IV SHU
Facility B IV SHU
Facility C IV
Facility D IV
Minimum Unit I
Corcoran
Facility III A III
Facility III B III
Facility IV A IV SHU
Facility IV B IV SHU
Minimum Unit I

Degrees of Custody
Generel
Classification committees at each institution shall assign a degree of custody to each inmate. Wardens are responsible for determining degrees of custody most appropriate for use at their institution.
Implementation
Each inmate shall be assigned the degree of custody that provides for their housing, assignment/activity and supervision needs.
Institution requirements may necessitate additional local designations, but shall conform to the Department's requirements for each degree of custody used.
The senior custodial officer on duty may designate the initial custody for new arrivals and may temporarily increase an inmate's custody at any time it becomes
necessary to protect the security and good order of the institution. Such actions shall be reviewed and custody assigned by a classification committee at the next
regular meeting.
Any reduction of an inmate's custody shall be by classification committee action.
Custody Designations
The following are the degrees of custody approved for use in the Department.
Maximum A
Housing. Single cells (when possible) or other areas designated as security or approved specialized housing units.
assignments/Activities. Confined to the security or approved specialized housing unit.
Supervision. Direct and constant.
Maximum B
Housing. Single cells (where possible) or other areas designated as security or approved specialized housing units.
Assignments/Activities. Confined to the security or approved specialized housing unit except for movement to and from external activities authorized for the unit.
Supervision. Direct and constant.
Every inmate confined in a SHU shall be assigned Maximum A or B custody. Inmates who are not housed in a specialized unit shall not be assigned maximum custody.
Close A
Housing. Celled housing in areas designated and maintained for higher security needs within the general population. This custody designation shall be used
only at institutions with a secure perimeter.
Assignments/Activities. Permitted during daylight hours only and limited to designated close security areas at non-walled institutions and to the main security areas in walled institutions. Supervision. Direct and constant.
Close B
Housing. Celled housing in secure areas designated for Close B custody.
Assignments/Activities. Within the security perimeter during daylight hours only, except for limited evening activities such as bathing and haircuts within the
assigned housing unit. Supervision. Constant and direct.
Medium A
Housing. Cells or dormitories within the security perimeter.
Assignments/Activities. Within the security perimeter.
Supervision. Frequent and direct.
Medium B
Housing. Cells or dormitories within the security perimeter.
Assignments/Activities. Within the security perimeter. Eligible for daytime assignments outside the security perimeter, but on prison grounds.
Supervision. Frequent and direct inside the security perimeter. Direct and constant outside the security perimeter.
Minimum A
Housing. Cells or dormitories within the security perimeter.
Assignments/Activities. Eligible for designated assignments inside or outside the security perimeter.
Supervision. Must be observed no less than hourly if assigned outside the security perimeter. Adequate supervision of the inmate's location to ensure their
presence if assigned inside the security area.
Minimum B
Housing. Cells or dormitories on prison grounds and/or in a camp setting.
Assignments/Activities. Eligible for off-reservation work detail/community betterment and camp assignments.
Supervision. Adequate supervision of the inmate's location to ensure their presence. Shall be counted no less than four times each 24 hours.
Institutional Classification Committees
All decisions affecting transfer, program participation, supervision, security, housing, and safety of persons, shall be made by a classification committee
composed of staff knowledgeable in the classification process. A chairperson and any two members of any committee shall comprise a quorum except for
reentry classification actions.
Decisions of classification committees shall be documented on a CDC Form 128-G and a copy given to the inmate.
Institution Classification Committee (ICC) Functions
ICC's shall:
• Review inter-institutional transfer recommendations in problem cases where departmental or public welfare is at stake.
• Review all cases referred by subcommittee.
• Refer cases to the Chief, Classification Services, or the DRB for resolution/action including recommendations to grant an inmate additional reduction of
sentence pursuant to PC 2935.
• Review the altered status of each inmate placed in segregated housing at the time of initial placement and at regular intervals thereafter in accordance
with the CCR 3335.
• Approve or deny disciplinary credit losses and inmate requests for credit restoration of Division A-1, A-2, and B offenses in accordance with CCR 3327.
This action shall serve as the first level of appeal review.
Authority
The ICC is delegated the primary authority for all classification actions within the institution.
Composition
ICC's shall consist of:
• Warden or Chief Deputy Warden (chairperson).
• AW (alternate chairperson).
• Psychiatrist or physician.
• Captain.
• CC-III or CC-II (committee recorder).
• Captain.
• Assignment lieutenant.
• Educational or vocational program representative.
• Other staff as required.

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  #18  
Old 01-14-2005, 01:54 PM
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Default Items you can send to a Reception Center Inmate

Reception Center Inmates

Due to their zero privilege status, Reception Center Inmates can receive a limited amount of items sent through the mail. Each Institution has their own set of policies for those items allowed. Following are the general guidelines for items you can send to a Reception Center inmate. To find out what’s allowed at a particular institution, please contact those facilities Public Information Officer or Mailroom Supervisor.(see writing an inmate for PIO telephone numbers by facility)

Items Allowed that you can send to a Reception Center Inmate
  • 50 Sheets of blank letter sized writing paper (you can send yellow or white letter sized legal lined paper removed from its binder)
  • 1 book of 20 count stamps or 20 pre-stamped envelopes available from your post office. (Some Institutions do not allow stamp books or loose stamps)
  • 10 4x6 photographs per mailing. On the back write your inmates name and CDC number.
  • 1 Pack of 5 count clear Bic pens in their original unopened packaging.
  • Special Occasion Cards. (Cannot include any type of metal, springs, decals, scents, music makers, ect.)
  • Items/Articles from the Internet. You may include articles, items and pictures obtained from the Internet in your correspondence. It is suggested that you copy the matter from the Internet and paste it to a blank word document. Some institutions do not allow writings that include a URL on the top or bottom of the page.
Sending Money Orders
  • Money Orders for Inmate Trust Accounts. It’s best to send a U.S. Postal Money Order. Make the M.O. payable to your inmate and include his housing #, bunk #, Facility address, City and State. (M.O.s are applied to the inmates trust account within 1-2 weeks of receipt. As of Jan 01, 2005 the CDC takes 44% of all funds sent to an inmate for the CA victims restitution fund. Effective Jan 01, 2007 this amount will increase to 55%. You may include your M.O.s in letters to your inmate and it is removed by the mailroom.)
When sending a stationary package to a reception center inmate, include the above items in a 10x15 or 12x15 manila envelope. State on the outside of the envelope the contents inside to assist mailroom personnel.

Reception Center Inmates cannot receive any books, magazines or publications. Do not use any type of labels, decals, glitter or scents.

Last edited by RPinSD; 03-28-2005 at 07:54 PM.. Reason: Corrected an Error
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Old 01-14-2005, 02:18 PM
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Default Writing an Inmate/Phone Contact/Mailing Addresses/Public Information Officer

Writing an Inmate
Phone Contact
Institution Mailing Addresses
Public Information’s Officer Telephone Numbers by Institution

General Mail Guidelines

Indiviuals are free to contact any state prison inmate by mail. Incoming letters are opened and inspected for contraband and then forwarded to the inmate. To ensure prompt processing the following information should be included on the envelope:
  • Inmate’s full name, CDC#
  • Institution Name
  • P.O. Box Housing (preferable)
  • City, CA ZIP
To get an inmate’s CDC# or housing assignment, individuals should call the Public Information Officer (PIO) or the inmate locator at the institution (see below for phone numbers).
Those people who don’t know where an inmate is housed may contact the Department’s ID Warrants unit at (916) 445-6713. A date of birth will be required if the person they are inquiring about has a common name. ID Warrants will not provide inmate-housing information.

Mailing Addresses
In most cases, the inmate mail address is different from the general institution address. Listed below are the inmate mail addresses for all California state prisons. Also listed are the phone numbers for the institution’s Public Information Officer, and where appropriate, the inmate locator units.


Phone Contact
Most inmates have access to telephones and can initiate outgoing collect calls. When corresponding with an inmate, individuals may provide a telephone number where an inmate can call them collect. It is up to the inmate to initiate the call. Phone calls are limited to 15 minutes. (Reception Center Inmates Do Not Have Access to Phones)


Avenal State Prison
P.O. Box 9, Avenal, CA 93204

PIO: (559) 386-0587, ext. 5025
(Call before sending mail because inmates change housing frequently.)


California Correctional Center
P.O. Box 2210, Susanville, CA 96130
PIO: (530) 257-2181


California Correctional Institution
P.O. Box (Inmates have individual P.O. boxes; call PIO.)
Tehachapi, CA 93581
PIO: (661) 822-4402, ext. 3021



California Institution for Men
Reception Center Central
P.O. Box 441


Reception Center West
P.O. Box 368


Reception Center East
P.O. Box 500


Minimum Support Facility
P.O. Box 600
Chino, CA 91708


PIO: (909) 597-1821, ext. 2901

California Institution for Women
16756 Chino-Corona Road
Frontera, CA 91720
PIO: (909) 597-1771, ext. 4921
Records office: (909) 597-1771, ext. 5230 (for housing)


California Medical Facility
P.O. Box 2000, Vacaville, CA 95696-2000
PIO: (707) 449-6509
Inmate locator: (707) 448-6841, ext. 2548 (for housing)


California Men’s Colony
P.O. Box 8101, San Luis Obispo, CA 93409-8101
PIO: (805) 547-7948


California Rehabilitation Center
P.O. Box 3535, Norco, CA 91760
PIO: (909) 689-4552


California State Prison, Corcoran
P.O. Box 3476, Corcoran, CA 93212-8309
PIO: (559) 992-6103


California State Prison, Los Angeles County
44750 60th Street West, Lancaster, CA 93536-7620
PIO: (661) 729-2000, ext. 6912


California State Prison, Sacramento
P.O. Box 290066, Represa, CA 95671-0066
PIO: (916) 985-8610, ext. 5295


California State Prison, Solano
P.O. Box 4000, Vacaville, CA 95696-4000
PIO: (707) 454-3257
Housing is necessary or letter will be returned.


Calipatria State Prison
P.O. Box 5002, Calipatria, CA 92233-5002
PIO: (760) 348-7000, ext. 5013


Centinela State Prison
P.O. Box 731, Imperial, CA 92251-0731 (general)
A Yard: P.O. Box 901
B Yard: P.O. Box 911
C Yard: P.O. Box 921
D Yard: P.O. Box 931
E Yard: P.O. Box 1011
Imperial, CA 92251
PIO: (760) 337-7601


California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility
P.O. Box 7100, Corcoran, CA 93212-7100
PIO: (559) 992-7154


Central California Women’s Facility
P.O. Box 1508, Chowchilla, CA 93610-1508
PIO: (559) 665-5531, ext. 5012


Chuckawalla Valley State Prison
P.O. Box 2349, Blythe, CA 92226
PIO: (760) 922-9710


Correctional Training Facility
Central Facility
P.O. Box 689, Soledad, CA 93960-0689


South Facility
P.O. Box 690, Soledad, CA 93960-0690


North Facility
P.O. Box 705, Soledad, CA 93960-0705


PIO: (831) 678-3951
Records office: (831) 678-3951, ext. 2139 (for housing)


Deuel Vocational Institution
P.O. Box 600, Tracy, CA 95378-0600
PIO: (209) 835-4141


Folsom State Prison
P.O. Box 715071
Represa, CA 95671-5071

PIO: (916) 985-2561, ext. 4484
Records office: (916) 985-2561, ext. 4469 (for housing)



High Desert State Prison
P.O. Box 3030, Susanville, CA 96130
PIO: (530) 251-5100, ext. 5512



Ironwood State Prison
P.O. Box 2199, Blythe, CA 92226
PIO: (760) 921-3000 ex. 5006
Records office: (760) 921-3000, ext. 5301 (for housing)


Mule Creek State Prison
P.O. Box 409000, Ione, CA 95640
PIO: (209) 274-4911, ext. 5080


North Kern State Prison
P.O. Box 5000, Delano, CA 93216-5000
PIO: (805) 721-2345, ext. 5022


Northern California Women’s Facility
P.O. Box 213022
Stockton, CA 95213-9022

PIO: (209) 943-1600 ex. 5025
(Housing assignment not necessary.)


Pelican Bay State Prison
P.O. Box 7500
Crescent City, CA 95531-7500

PIO: (707) 465-9040
Mail room: (707) 465-1000, ext. 7101 (for housing)



Pleasant Valley State Prison
P.O. Box 8500, Coalinga, CA 93210 (general)
Facility A: P.O. Box 8501
Facility B: P.O. Box 8502
Facility C: P.O. Box 8503
Facility D: P.O. Box 8504
Coalinga, CA 93210
PIO: (559) 935-4972


Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility at Rock Mountain
480 Alta Road, San Diego, CA 92179
PIO: (619) 661-7802
Records office: (619) 661-6500, ext. 5420 (for housing)



Salinas Valley State Prison
P.O. Box 1050, Soledad, CA 93690-1050
PIO: (831) 678-5554



San Quentin State Prison
San Quentin, CA 94974
PIO: (415) 454-1460, ext. 5008


Sierra Conservation Center
Mariposa and Calaveras Units: P.O. Box 617
Tuolumne Unit: P.O. Box 500
Jamestown, CA 95327
PIO: (209) 984-5291


Valley State Prison for Women
P.O. Box 92, Chowchilla, CA 93610-0092
PIO: (559) 665-6100, ext. 5509


Wasco State Prison
P.O. Box 5500, Wasco, CA 93280-5500
PIO: (661) 758-8400

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  #20  
Old 01-27-2005, 12:16 PM
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Default Three Strikes and You're Out/Explained and Defined

Three Strikes, You're Out

California's "Three Strikes" Law was signed on March 7, 1994. The "Three Strikes" law applies to anyone who has two or more prior serious or violent felony convictions. These convictions are called " strikes." There are mandatory sentences in "Three Strikes" cases.

Mandatory Doubled Sentence- If you have one prior "strike" your prison term for the new felony conviction may be doubled.

Mandatory Life Sentence- If you have two or more prior "strikes," your term for the new felony conviction may be a minimum of 25 years to life in prison.

Mandatory State Prison- The judge will sentence you to State prison. No probation, no county jail, no California Youth Authority, and no Civil Addict Program.

Mandatory Consecutive Sentences. All of your new convictions must be sentenced consecutively. No concurrent sentences. Maximum 20 Percent Conduct Credits. You must serve at least 80 percent of your new sentence before you may be paroled.

Q. What crimes are "strikes?"
A. A list of the serious and violent crimes are found in Penal Code (PC) Sections 667.5(c) and 1192.7(c).


Q. Does your new felony conviction have to be serious or violent for you to be punished under "Three Strikes?"
A. No. Any new felony conviction may be sentenced under "Three Strikes" if you have been previously convicted of two or more serious or violent felonies. This means that if you have two prior "strike" convictions, you may be sentenced to a minimum of 25 years to life for any new felony state prison conviction.


Q. Does a prior serious or violent conviction, which occurred before March 7, 1994 count as a "strike?"
A. Yes. Prior serious or violent felony convictions that occurred before March 7, 1994 are counted as "strikes." If you were convicted of a serious or violent felony before "Three Strikes" became law on March 7, 1994, that conviction will make the "Three Strikes" law apply to you if you commit any new felony.


Q. How long do prior convictions count as "strikes?"
A. Forever. There is no washout period under "Three Strikes."


Q. Is a prior serious or violent felony conviction counted as a "strike" even if it occurred in another state or in the federal courts?
A. Yes. Out of state and federal convictions for serious or violent felonies are counted as "strikes."


Q. Is a prior serious or violent felony conviction a "strike" even if you didn't go to prison for that conviction?
A. Yes. Your prior conviction of a serious or violent felony will count as a "strike" no matter what sentence you received for the prior conviction.


Q. Do juvenile adjudication's count as "strikes?"
A. Yes. A juvenile adjudication of a serious or violent felony may count as a "strike" under "Three Strikes."

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  #21  
Old 01-27-2005, 12:24 PM
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Default Penal Code Section 667.5 Three Strikes Enhancements

667.5. Enhancement of prison terms for new offenses because of
prior prison terms shall be imposed as follows:
(a) Where one of the new offenses is one of the violent felonies
specified in subdivision (c), in addition to and consecutive to any
other prison terms therefor, the court shall impose a three-year term
for each prior separate prison term served by the defendant where
the prior offense was one of the violent felonies specified in
subdivision (c). However, no additional term shall be imposed under
this subdivision for any prison term served prior to a period of 10
years in which the defendant remained free of both prison custody and
the commission of an offense which results in a felony conviction.
(b) Except where subdivision (a) applies, where the new offense is
any felony for which a prison sentence is imposed, in addition and
consecutive to any other prison terms therefor, the court shall
impose a one-year term for each prior separate prison term served for
any felony; provided that no additional term shall be imposed under
this subdivision for any prison term served prior to a period of five
years in which the defendant remained free of both prison custody
and the commission of an offense which results in a felony
conviction.
(c) For the purpose of this section, "violent felony" shall mean
any of the following:
(1) Murder or voluntary manslaughter.
(2) Mayhem.
(3) Rape as defined in paragraph (2) or (6) of subdivision (a) of
Section 261 or paragraph (1) or (4) of subdivision (a) of Section
262.
(4) Sodomy by force, violence, duress, menace, or fear of
immediate and unlawful bodily injury on the victim or another person.
(5) Oral copulation by force, violence, duress, menace, or fear of
immediate and unlawful bodily injury on the victim or another
person.
(6) Lewd acts on a child under the age of 14 years as defined in
Section 288.
(7) Any felony punishable by death or imprisonment in the state
prison for life.
(8) Any felony in which the defendant inflicts great bodily injury
on any person other than an accomplice which has been charged and
proved as provided for in Section 12022.7 or 12022.9 on or after July
1, 1977, or as specified prior to July 1, 1977, in Sections 213,
264, and 461, or any felony in which the defendant uses a firearm
which use has been charged and proved as provided in Section 12022.5
or 12022.55.
(9) Any robbery.
(10) Arson, in violation of subdivision (a) or (b) of Section 451.
(11) The offense defined in subdivision (a) of Section 289 where
the act is accomplished against the victim's will by force, violence,
duress, menace, or fear of immediate and unlawful bodily injury on
The victim or another person.
(12) Attempted murder.
(13) A violation of Section 12308, 12309, or 12310.
(14) Kidnapping.
(15) Assault with the intent to commit mayhem, rape, sodomy, or
oral copulation, in violation of Section 220.
(16) Continuous sexual abuse of a child, in violation of Section
288.5.
(17) Carjacking, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 215.
(18) A violation of Section 264.1.
(19) Extortion, as defined in Section 518, which would constitute
a felony violation of Section 186.22 of the Penal Code.
(20) Threats to victims or witnesses, as defined in Section 136.1,
which would constitute a felony violation of Section 186.22 of the
Penal Code.
(21) Any burglary of the first degree, as defined in subdivision
(a) of Section 460, wherein it is charged and proved that another
person, other than an accomplice, was present in the residence during
the commission of the burglary.
(22) Any violation of Section 12022.53.
(23) A violation of subdivision (b) or (c) of Section 11418.
The Legislature finds and declares that these specified crimes
merit special consideration when imposing a sentence to display
society's condemnation for these extraordinary crimes of violence
against the person.
(d) For the purposes of this section, the defendant shall be
deemed to remain in prison custody for an offense until the official
discharge from custody or until release on parole, whichever first
occurs, including any time during which the defendant remains subject
to reimprisonment for escape from custody or is reimprisoned on
revocation of parole. The additional penalties provided for prior
prison terms shall not be imposed unless they are charged and
admitted or found true in the action for the new offense.
(e) The additional penalties provided for prior prison terms shall
not be imposed for any felony for which the defendant did not serve
a prior separate term in state prison.
(f) A prior conviction of a felony shall include a conviction in
another jurisdiction for an offense which, if committed in
California, is punishable by imprisonment in the state prison if the
defendant served one year or more in prison for the offense in the
other jurisdiction. A prior conviction of a particular felony shall
include a conviction in another jurisdiction for an offense which
includes all of the elements of the particular felony as defined
under California law if the defendant served one year or more in
prison for the offense in the other jurisdiction.
(g) A prior separate prison term for the purposes of this section
shall mean a continuous completed period of prison incarceration
imposed for the particular offense alone or in combination with
concurrent or consecutive sentences for other crimes, including any
reimprisonment on revocation of parole which is not accompanied by a
new commitment to prison, and including any reimprisonment after an
escape from incarceration.
(h) Serving a prison term includes any confinement time in any
state prison or federal penal institution as punishment for
commission of an offense, including confinement in a hospital or
other institution or facility credited as service of prison time in
the jurisdiction of the confinement.
(i) For the purposes of this section, a commitment to the State
Department of Mental Health as a mentally disordered sex offender
following a conviction of a felony, which commitment exceeds one year
in duration, shall be deemed a prior prison term.
(j) For the purposes of this section, when a person subject to the
custody, control, and discipline of the Director of Corrections is
incarcerated at a facility operated by the Department of the Youth
Authority, that incarceration shall be deemed to be a term served in
state prison.
(k) Notwithstanding subdivisions (d) and (g) or any other
provision of law, where one of the new offenses is committed while
the defendant is temporarily removed from prison pursuant to Section
2690 or while the defendant is transferred to a community facility
pursuant to Section 3416, 6253, or 6263, or while the defendant is on
furlough pursuant to Section 6254, the defendant shall be subject to
the full enhancements provided for in this section.
This subdivision shall not apply when a full, separate, and
consecutive term is imposed pursuant to any other provision of law.

Last edited by RPinSD; 01-27-2005 at 12:28 PM..
  #22  
Old 01-27-2005, 12:29 PM
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Default Penal Code Section 1192.7 Three Strikes Enhancements/Serious Felonies

1192.7. (a) Plea bargaining in any case in which the indictment or
information charges any serious felony, any felony in which it is
alleged that a firearm was personally used by the defendant, or any
offense of driving while under the influence of alcohol, drugs,
narcotics, or any other intoxicating substance, or any combination
thereof, is prohibited, unless there is insufficient evidence to
prove the people's case, or testimony of a material witness cannot be
obtained, or a reduction or dismissal would not result in a
substantial change in sentence.
(b) As used in this section "plea bargaining" means any
bargaining, negotiation, or discussion between a criminal defendant,
or his or her counsel, and a prosecuting attorney or judge, whereby
the defendant agrees to plead guilty or nolo contendere, in exchange
for any promises, commitments, concessions, assurances, or
consideration by the prosecuting attorney or judge relating to any
charge against the defendant or to the sentencing of the defendant.
(c) As used in this section, "serious felony" means any of the
following:
(1) Murder or voluntary manslaughter; (2) mayhem; (3) rape; (4)
sodomy by force, violence, duress, menace, threat of great bodily
injury, or fear of immediate and unlawful bodily injury on the victim
or another person; (5) oral copulation by force, violence, duress,
menace, threat of great bodily injury, or fear of immediate and
unlawful bodily injury on the victim or another person; (6) lewd or
lascivious act on a child under the age of 14 years; (7) any felony
punishable by death or imprisonment in the state prison for life; (8)
any felony in which the defendant personally inflicts great bodily
injury on any person, other than an accomplice, or any felony in
which the defendant personally uses a firearm; (9) attempted murder;
(10) assault with intent to commit rape or robbery; (11) assault with
a deadly weapon or instrument on a peace officer; (12) assault by a
life prisoner on a noninmate; (13) assault with a deadly weapon by an
inmate; (14) arson; (15) exploding a destructive device or any
explosive with intent to injure; (16) exploding a destructive device
or any explosive causing bodily injury, great bodily injury, or
mayhem; (17) exploding a destructive device or any explosive with
intent to murder; (18) any burglary of the first degree; (19) robbery
or bank robbery; (20) kidnapping; (21) holding of a hostage by a
person confined in a state prison; (22) attempt to commit a felony
punishable by death or imprisonment in the state prison for life;
(23) any felony in which the defendant personally used a dangerous or
deadly weapon; (24) selling, furnishing, administering, giving, or
offering to sell, furnish, administer, or give to a minor any heroin,
cocaine, phencyclidine (PCP), or any methamphetamine-related drug,
as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 11055 of
the Health and Safety Code, or any of the precursors of
methamphetamines, as described in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1)
of subdivision (f) of Section 11055 or subdivision (a) of Section
11100 of the Health and Safety Code; (25) any violation of
subdivision (a) of Section 289 where the act is accomplished against
the victim's will by force, violence, duress, menace, or fear of
immediate and unlawful bodily injury on the victim or another person;
(26) grand theft involving a firearm; (27) carjacking; (28) any
felony offense, which would also constitute a felony violation of
Section 186.22; (29) assault with the intent to commit mayhem, rape,
sodomy, or oral copulation, in violation of Section 220; (30)
throwing acid or flammable substances, in violation of Section 244;
(31) assault with a deadly weapon, firearm, machinegun, assault
weapon, or semiautomatic firearm or assault on a peace officer or
firefighter, in violation of Section 245; (32) assault with a deadly
weapon against a public transit employee, custodial officer, or
school employee, in violation of Sections 245.2, 245.3, or 245.5;
(33) discharge of a firearm at an inhabited dwelling, vehicle, or
aircraft, in violation of Section 246; (34) commission of rape or
sexual penetration in concert with another person, in violation of
Section 264.1; (35) continuous sexual abuse of a child, in violation
of Section 288.5; (36) shooting from a vehicle, in violation of
subdivision (c) or (d) of Section 12034; (37) intimidation of victims
or witnesses, in violation of Section 136.1; (38) criminal threats,
in violation of Section 422; (39) any attempt to commit a crime
listed in this subdivision other than an assault; (40) any violation
of Section 12022.53; (41) a violation of subdivision (b) or (c) of
Section 11418; and (42) any conspiracy to commit an offense described
in this subdivision.
(d) As used in this section, "bank robbery" means to take or
attempt to take, by force or violence, or by intimidation from the
person or presence of another any property or money or any other
thing of value belonging to, or in the care, custody, control,
management, or possession of, any bank, credit union, or any savings
and loan association.
As used in this subdivision, the following terms have the
following meanings:
(1) "Bank" means any member of the Federal Reserve System, and any
bank, banking association, trust company, savings bank, or other
banking institution organized or operating under the laws of the
United States, and any bank the deposits of which are insured by the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.
(2) "Savings and loan association" means any federal savings and
loan association and any "insured institution" as defined in Section
401 of the National Housing Act, as amended, and any federal credit
union as defined in Section 2 of the Federal Credit Union Act.
(3) "Credit union" means any federal credit union and any
state-chartered credit union the accounts of which are insured by the
Administrator of the National Credit Union administration.
(e) The provisions of this section shall not be amended by the
Legislature except by statute passed in each house by rollcall vote
entered in the journal, two-thirds of the membership concurring, or
by a statute that becomes effective only when approved by the
electors.

Last edited by RPinSD; 01-27-2005 at 12:35 PM..
  #23  
Old 01-27-2005, 01:29 PM
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Default California Department of Corrections Parolee Handbook

Parolee Handbook given to all paroled inmates in the State of California can be found here, Via Corr.ca.gov/parole division


Parolee Handbook

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  #24  
Old 02-03-2005, 02:28 PM
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Default Pending Legislation Affecting Inmates & Families Of

This is a list current legislation being heard before the State Assembly or State Senate that in someway will have a positive or negative impact on Inmates, The California Department of Corrections, Prisons, Inmate Healthcare and Parole Issues.

This Section will be updated weekly to include any new items heard that week.

AB 73
Prescription Drugs, Importation and Procurement
Comment On Bill

AB 77
Department of Corrections Pilot Program, Health Care to Inmates
Comment On Bill

AB 96
Terms of Probation: Domestic Violence: Child
Comment On Bill

AB100
Arraignment by Audio Video Communication
Comment On Bill

AB 113
Parole Placement
Comment On Bill

AB 125
Controlled Substances: Cocaine Penalties
Comment On Bill

AB 161
Prisoners: Clergy
Comment On Bill

AB 167
Domestic Violence, Conditions of Probation
Comment On Bill

AB 183
Conservation Camps: Madera County
Comment On Bill

AB 212
Family Visits (Update: Defeated in Commitee)
Comment On Bill

AB 217
Sex offenders: nursing facilities.
Comment On Bill

AB 221
Violent sexual felonies: early release credit
Comment On Bill

AB 240
Sex offenders: schools
Comment On Bill

AB 296
Hepatitas C.
Comment On Bill

AB 305
Vehicles: police vehicle pursuit: punishment
Comment On Bill


AB 324
Correctional Facilites: Clergy Access
Comment On Bill

AB 335

Crime: bail
Comment On Bill

AB 437

Sex offenders: Megan's Law: convictions
Comment On Bill


AB 478

Female inmates
Comment On Bill

AB 505

Prisoners
Comment On Bill

AB 603

Sexually violent predators: term of commitment
Comment On Bill


AB 658
Women Inmates
Comment On Bill

SB 159
Inmate Healthcare Services
Comment On Bill

California State Senators

California State Assembly

PM Me Legislation You'd Like to See Added

A Big thanks to Becmarie for her tireless research of CA legislation to keep you updated.

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  #25  
Old 02-11-2005, 02:21 PM
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Default History of the California Division of Juvenile Justice and California Youth Authority

History of the California Youth Authority

1850 California became a state. There were no correctional facilities for juveniles. Some consideration was given to the need for a reform school at that time, but none was authorized.

Serious cases, about 300 boys under the age of 20, were sent to the state prisons at San Quentin (Marin County) and Folsom (Sacramento County), between 1850 and 1860. This included 12-, 13- and 14-year-old boys.

1859 The San Francisco Industrial School was founded on May 5, 1859 by an act of the state Legislature. The school opened with a total of 48 boys and girls, ranging from 3-18 years of age and a staff of six. It was run by a private board. Management could accept children from parents and police, as well as the courts. The program consisted of 6 hours per day of school (classroom) and four hours per day work. Trade training was added later. Releases were obtained by (1) discharge, (2) indenture, and (3) leave of absence, very similar to present day probation and/or parole.

1860 The State Reform School for boys in Marysville was authorized and opened in 1861. Age range: 8-18.

1868 The State Reform School for Boys at Marysville closed due to lack of commitments. Twenty-eight boys were transferred to the San Francisco Industrial School. The State donated $10,000 to the San Francisco Industrial School and agreed to pay $15 in gold coin per month for each child of the school.

During this year, girls in the Industrial School were transferred to the Magdalen Asylum in San Francisco

1870 The Legislature permitted commitment to the San Francisco Industrial School from the counties of Santa Clara, San Mateo and Alameda.

1872 The first "Probation Law" was enacted (Section 1203 Penal Code).

1876 The training ship Jamestown was transferred from the U.S. Navy to the City of San Francisco to supplement the San Francisco Industrial School. The ship was to provide training in seamanship and navigation for boys of eligible age. After six months, an examination was given and successful trainees were eligible for employment as seamen on regular merchant ships.

1879 The training ship was returned to the Navy due to mismanagement and a hue and cry that the Jamestown was a training ship for criminals.

1890 The Legislature enacted a law establishing two State reform schools. Both were part of the Division of Institutions, and both had trade training and academic classes. Commitments were made from Police Courts, Justice Courts, and Courts of Session for a specialized period of time or minority. These schools were: (1) Whittier State Reformatory (now Fred C. Nelles School in Whittier) and (2) the Preston School of Industry in lone (Amador County).

1891 The Whittier State Reformatory for Boys and Girls opened with an enrollment of 300 youth.

1892 The San Francisco Industrial School closed, and the Preston School of Industry opened.

1903 The Legislature enacted law establishing Juvenile Courts.

1907 All wards under 18 were transferred out of San Quentin by legislative decree.

1909 County juvenile halls were established.

1913 Ventura School for Girls was established and girls transferred from Whittier State Reformatory to Ventura.

1929 First statewide supervision began -- a Probation Office was created, under the State Department of Social Welfare.

1935 The Legislature authorized County Boards of Supervisors to establish forestry camps for delinquent youths.

1941 The Youth Corrections Authority Act was adopted by the California Legislature. The law:

1. Created a three-person commission appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate.

2. Mandated acceptance of all commitments under 23 years of age, including those from Juvenile Court.

3. Added a section on delinquency prevention.

4. Authorized no authority over existing state institutions.

5. Appropriated $100,000 to run the Authority for two years.

The Whittier School for Boys was renamed the Fred C. Nelles School in honor of the man who served as the facility's superintendent from 1912 to 1927.

1942 Preston School of Industry, Ventura School for Girls and the Fred C. Nelles School for Boys were separated from the Division of Institutions and became part of the Youth Authority.

The first ward committed under the Youth Corrections Authority Act--YA No. 00001 arrived at the new Youth Authority Unit, a diagnostic facility. The ward was transferred from San Quentin Prison, where he had been sent at age 14 after being convicted for second-degree murder. A "lifer," he had shot an uncle during a quarrel over ranch chores.

The Youth Authority moved to establish camps, and a unit -- Delinquency Prevention Services -- was established.

1943 Karl Holton was named first director.

The Governor transferred management of state reformatories Preston, Nelles and Ventura to the Youth Corrections Authority. Total wards in institutions. 1,080 total wards on parole, 1,625 staff, 517.

The State Probation Office turned over responsibility for delinquency prevention to the Youth Corrections Authority. The word "corrections" was dropped from title; hence, California Youth Authority (CYA).

Fifty boys transferred from county jails to the Calaveras Big Trees Park where they built a 100-bed capacity camp

The Youth Authority acquired property and buildings formerly used by the Knights of Pythias Old Peoples' Home. Boys from Preston and the Calaveras Camp cleaned and renovated the grounds and buildings, and the Los Guillicos School for Girls was established in Sonoma County.

1944 The Youth Authority entered into a contract with the military for the establishment of two camps -- one at Benicia Arsenal and the other at the Stockton Ordnance Depot -- each with a population of 150 boys.

1945 The first boys arrived at Fricot Ranch School in Calaveras County. By Fall of 1945, 100 boys and a full complement of staff were at the school. The 1,090-acre estate was leased with an option to purchase for $60,000 and that option was exercised in 1946.

Many youthful offenders in detention homes, jail and two army camps were awaiting commitment to the Youth Authority. Army camps were closed after the war and the growing need for facilities became a crisis.

The Division of Parole was created and the parole staff consolidated.
The need was apparent for an older boy institution, and the Legislature authorized the California Vocational Institution at Lancaster (an old Army/Air Force Base).

A state subsidy was given to counties for establishment of juvenile homes, ranches, camps for Juvenile Court wards. The subsidy was administered by the Youth Authority.

Pine Grove Camp was established in Amador County.

1947 Camp Ben Lomond opened in Santa Cruz County.

The first wards arrived at the El Paso de Robles School for Boys (San Luis Obispo County) on September 30, (old Army/Air Base 200 acres and 40 barrack buildings purchased for $8,000.

1948 Governor Earl Warren called the first Statewide Youth Conference in Sacramento in January, with an estimated 2,200 people attended, including 200 high school and college youths.

1952 Heman G. Stark was named director and served until 1968. His tenure remains the longest of any CYA director.

1953 The Youth Authority was given departmental status.

1954 Northern and Southern Reception Centers opened, in Sacramento and Norwalk, respectively.

1956 Mt. Bullion Camp opened in Mariposa County.

1960 The Youth Training School opened in San Bernardino County.

1961 The Youth Authority was placed under the newly formed Youth and Adult Corrections Agency.

Washington Ridge Camp opened in Nevada County.

1962 Ventura School for Girls moved from its Ventura location to its present location in Camarillo.

1963 The state's Juvenile Court Law was modified.

1964 A reception center and clinic was established at the Ventura School for Girls, and the girls at the Southern Reception Center and Clinic in Norwalk were transferred to Ventura.

1965 Northern California Youth Center (NCYC) opened near Stockton (San Joaquin County)

1966 O. H. Close School for Boys opened at NCYC.

1968 Allen Breed was named director.

Karl Holton School for Boys opened at NCYC.

An administrative reorganization plan was implemented, establishing North and South Divisions.

Facilities were constructed at Pine Grove and Ben Lomond Camps.

1969 The Youth Authority, along with the Department of Corrections, was placed within the Human Relations Agency (which became the Health and Welfare Agency).

1970 A change in the law meant fewer female commitments, so Ventura School for Girls became co-educational.

1971 DeWitt Nelson School opened at NCYC.

Los Guillicos became co-educational with boys from Fricot Ranch.

Fricot Ranch was closed due to declining ward population.

Oak Glen Camp opened in San Bernardino County.

1972 El Paso de Robles School closed due to declining commitments.

1974 El Paso de Robles School reopened, as commitments began to rise again.

1976 Pearl West was named director, the first woman to hold the position.

1979 Fenner Canyon Camp opened in Los Angeles County.

1980 The Youth Authority became part of the newly formed Youth and Adult Correctional Agency.

The Legislature removed the state's young offender paroling authority, the Youth Authority Board, from the CYA and renamed it the Youthful Offender Parole Board (YOPB). The director had also served as chairman of the board. Antonio C. Amador was selected to chair the "new" YOPB.

1981 Antonio C. Amador, former Los Angeles Police Protective League president was named director, the first Hispanic to hold the position.

1983 James Rowland, chief probation officer of Fresno County, was named director and introduced the concept of involving crime victims in youth correctional programs.

1984 "Impact of Crime on Victims" curriculum was implemented and was introduced in each institution and camp in the Youth Authority. This was a pioneering effort that has since been shared with other states and localities across the country.

The department adopted a policy of employment readiness as a major goal for wards and began reorganizing its Vocational Educational Program to make training more relevant with available jobs.

1985 Free Venture a program involving public/private partnerships for ward employment, began. The CYA agreed to provide space to private sector businesses, which meet certain criteria. In turn, the businesses hire and train wards that earn prevailing wages for real jobs.

Wards who earn these jobs then become taxpayers. Also, percentages of their earnings go to victim restitution, room and board, a trust fund and a savings account. Trans World Airlines became the first Free Venture partner, instituting a project at Ventura School.

El Centro Training Center opened as a short-term Institutions and Camps (I&C) Branch facility in Imperial County.

1987 C. A. Terhune, a 30-year veteran of the CYA, was named director.

1989 El Centro Drug Program for Girls opened.

1990 Ventura School opened a camp program and instituted the department's first female fire fighting crew.

Oak Glen Camp was closed due to budget concerns.

Fenner Canyon Camp was transferred to CDC.

El Centro closed as an I&C facility and reopened as the Southern California Drug Treatment Center operated by the Parole Services Branch.

1991 B. T. Collins, a Vietnam war hero who lost an arm and a leg in that conflict, was appointed director in March and resigned in August, when he was asked to run for the State Assembly by the Governor.

William B. Kolender, former police chief of San Diego was appointed director.

N. A. Chaderjian School opened, a 600-bed institution at NCYC, increasing to four the number of training schools at that site. Chaderjian was secretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency at the time of his untimely death in 1988.

Fred C. Nelles School celebrated its Centennial.

1992 The Youth Authority's first boot camp program (30 beds) opened at Preston School. It was named LEAD (Leadership, Esteem, Ability and Discipline) and served as a model for other juvenile boot camps in the country.

Preston School of Industry celebrated its Centennial.

1993 The second LEAD (Boot Camp) Program (30 beds) opened at Fred C. Nelles School.

The First Superintendent of Education position was created, and the department began a reorganization of the Education Program.

The Youth Authority Training Center opens at the NCYC complex.

1994 Karl Holton School was converted to the Karl Holton Drug and Alcohol Abuse Treatment Center (DAATC), (now known as Karl Holton Youth Correctional Drug and Alcohol Treatment Facility), devoted entirely to programming wards with substance use and abuse problems. The Youth Authority thus became the first youthful offender agency in the country to devote an entire major institution for that purpose.

1995 Craig L. Brown, undersecretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, was named director.

1996 Francisco J. Alarcon, chief deputy director, was appointed director.

1997 Youth Authority Institutions and Camps were changed to include "Youth Correctional"

1999 Gregorio S. Zermeno, Superintendent at the De Witt Nelson Correctional Facility, was appointed Director in March 1999.

2000 Jerry L. Harper, former under sheriff of the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department, was appointed Director in March 2000.

2003 Karl Holton Drug and Alcohol Abuse Treatment Center in Stockton was closed September 2003. The facility was opened in 1968.

Walter Allen III was appointed director by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Mr. Allen was the Assistant Chief for the California Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotics Enforcement.

2004 The Northern Youth Correctional Reception Center and Clinic in Sacramento was closed in February 2004. The clinic was opened in 1956

In February 2004, the Ventura Youth Correctional Facility in Camarillo returned to a females-only facility. The only male wards are at the S. Carraway Fire and Public Safety Center.

In June 2004, the CYA closed the Fred C. Nelles Youth Correctional Facility in Whittier. This was its oldest facility spanning more than 100 years. The last ward left the facility on May 27, 2004

In June 2004, the CYA closed its operation of Mt. Bullion Youth Conservation Camp in Mariposa County.

2005 The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Establishes the Division of Juvenile Justice to be operated as a seperate division of the CDCR. The DJJ carries out its responsibilities through three divisions - the Division of Juvenile Facilities, the Division of Juvenile Programs, and the Division of Juvenile Parole Services.

Last edited by RPinSD; 01-18-2006 at 12:40 PM.. Reason: Update DJJ
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