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  #1  
Old 06-03-2017, 03:10 PM
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Default Husband injured by CO, charged w/ assault on CO. Going to trial, any advice

First and for most I'd like to thank whomever clicked into this forum, hopefully it will take me one step closer to my goal.
In the end of march beginning of April of 2016 my husband was assaulted by correctional officers and as a result was taken to medical attention for a broken jaw and broken ribs. He did what was correct within his rights and filed for a suit and now they're charging him with "assault on c.o" thus extending his sentence. He's taking it to trial because he knows he didn't do it. I'm worried and scared for him, his court appointed lawyer isn't helping much and the witnesses have been moved to different facilities making contact for the lawyer even harder. Any info or help would be highly appreciated. Thank you
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Old 06-04-2017, 04:06 AM
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Well, the attorney has to handle things like discovery and witnesses.

It sounds like, and granted I am only getting your side here, but it is sounding like the DOC in this case might be trying to make it more difficult to fight the case.

That said, DOC is not allowed to disrupt justice or withhold witnesses.

Your husband, when he does have access to his attorney, should ask him what he is doing to ensure that witnesses on his behalf will be called. If the attorney isn't doing the work to make sure that his witnesses are being called and is not getting an adequate defense, that is something that can be taken up as an issue in court with the judge. The judge can help determine if the attorney is not offering effective assistance and, if it is actually necessary, remove his current attorney and appoint another one.

That said, these actions need to be investigated by and taken by your husband. You can't do it yourself. Unfortunately, and you've probably learned this through the time he has been down, but I am going to reinforce it here....we as "outmates" have very little control and very little say in how these sorts of issues get resolved. Do give him feedback but as much as possible, unless his attorney is given permission to speak to you and seeks out your opinion on the issue, leave it to him and his attorney.

If it is as bad as you are saying, then the DOC is obstructing his ability to mount a defense and that can cause problems for the DA and for the prison. If that is truly what is happening then the judge needs to be aware of it, and his attorney is 1.) the best person to be able to determine if that is an issue and 2.) the best person to raise the issue with a judge.

Remember that even the best lawyers have heavy caseloads and will dedicate resources on a certain priority level. I don't know how close your husband's case is to actually having a trial date and picking a jury, or if it's still in preliminary stages, or if it's past the preliminary hearing and now pretrial motions and the like are being filed...but I assure you that the attorney will do the necessary work to prepare for this case and present the best defense he can based on the charges, the specifics of the allegation, and any mitigating factors or reliable testimony that may exist.

If the attorney is truly that bad, that's an issue that could later result in an appealable issue or a new trial. But keep in mind that attorneys are generally not that bad because if they were they would lose their license.

Legal proceedings take time. Developing a case and doing Discovery takes time. It may not seem like it right now, but it could be that the attorney isn't talking much with your husband because there might not, in fact, be much for him to talk about right now.

Patience. And keep giving him support. And remind him you win more friends with sugar than salt, so talking with his attorney politely to address his concerns at his next court date would be a good idea. He may need to be a little firm to iterate it's important that he get some time. If he still isn't satisfied then he should bring it up with the judge who may mediate the situation or who may agree and appoint new counsel (or who may have more knowledge of what's going on than your husband does and say "stick with the guy you got.")

I wish you and your husband luck. It sounds like the process is frustrating, and being falsely accused, particularly when you were the one assaulted, absolutely sucks. I wish there was a magic remedy to resolve this issue, but that's going to be the best approach. I hope that this will turn out well for him.

-E
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Old 06-04-2017, 06:53 PM
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Where free-world charges are going to be filed, it is not uncommon in many jurisdictions to see delays of a year or two before the State moves to indict. After all, they know the defendant isn't going anywhere anytime soon. Further, time spent in custody without an indictment is time the State does not have to grant if there is a new conviction.

Defense counsel will know how to arrange for a bench warrant when trial dates grow closer. Movement of potential witnesses to other units is not a hindrance. The defendant does not need to be on the same unit as the witness and vice-versa in order to prepare for trial.

When a date is not pending for an actual trial setting, there simply isn't much that goes on that requires counsel to be in regular contact with the client. There just isn't. The attorney got the basic story when they met with the client. Unless the client is consistently changing their story (yes, it happens), then the attorney has what they need until they can get the basic Brady materials. Once those materials have come in, then at THAT time, some modicum of actual strategy will begin getting crystalized...
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Old 06-17-2017, 10:28 AM
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Update: so he presented a motion with plausible disputes for the prosecutor to his court appointed lawyer and I'm praying that they'll dismiss the charge but he feels that feels that his lawyer is in cahoots with the prosecutor. Should I feel worried too? I don't want him to get added time to his sentence. What is the best thing I should do on the outside? He keeps asking me to search for pro Bono lawyers that would take his case.
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Old 06-17-2017, 10:58 AM
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>What is the best thing I should do on the outside?

I don't know. So I'll pass along something another person here said.

There's a regular here under the name "yourself" whose posts I have learned to respect highly. She was in a discussion of another situation where the person on the outside wanted to help with the defense.

What she said was that one of the dangers, maybe one of the worst dangers, is the defendant not being able to think straight under the inhuman strain of a criminal prosecution, and screwing up major decisions as a result. She's a defense lawyer and has watched this happen with her own eyes.

Yourself went on to point out that an outside loved one is the best person to head off that problem. I think yourself may even have suggested taking psychology classes!
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Old 06-17-2017, 11:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minor activist View Post
>What is the best thing I should do on the outside?

I don't know. So I'll pass along something another person here said.

There's a regular here under the name "yourself" whose posts I have learned to respect highly. She was in a discussion of another situation where the person on the outside wanted to help with the defense.

What she said was that one of the dangers, maybe one of the worst dangers, is the defendant not being able to think straight under the inhuman strain of a criminal prosecution, and screwing up major decisions as a result. She's a defense lawyer and has watched this happen with her own eyes.

Yourself went on to point out that an outside loved one is the best person to head off that problem. I think yourself may even have suggested taking psychology classes!
I don't know I just feel so useless and personally I want everything to work out for the best and I doesn't help the fact that I'm so far away ( he's located in new York and I'm in Puerto Rico)
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Old 06-17-2017, 02:55 PM
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You feel useless.

If Yourself knows what she's talking about and I understand her right, you're useful, the kind of useful that can make the difference between a good and bad outcome.

If Yourself knows what she's talking about and I understand her right, you can do more good by helping your LO stay sane than you could do on the legal front even if you were working out of the attorney's office.

Yourself knows what she's talking about.
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Old 06-18-2017, 03:26 PM
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Let his lawyer handle things.

Lawyers are not generally 'in cahoots' with anyone. They all know each other, probably occasionally hang out at the same bars, see each other in court regularly, etc. They will try to keep a decent relationship with as many other lawyers as possible so that they have some grounds of pleasant reliability on which to talk over legal points, pleas, etc. It doesn't mean they are working against the defendant. If it were a bad relationship, it would be a point against the lawyer, because he wouldn't be able to squeeze out anything in discussions.
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Old 06-18-2017, 07:53 PM
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I'm going to give you my lecture - stay out of the legal stuff. It's not what you do. It's not how you've chosen to spend your life. It's not what you've studied. It's not how you help your LO.

Look, even if you were an eminent attorney licensed in his jurisdiction with decades of experience in that very court, you'd be a fool to represent your LO. You'd also be a bloody nuisance to the attorney trying to offer a zealous defense. Why? Because you are too emotionally involved to apply the law. Just as you don't want your mother performing open heart surgery on you or your LO, you don't want to try your hand at DIY law when there's so much at steak.

Now, the good news is that the very emotionality that would make you a sh!t lawyer in this case is very important in that you can do things that attorneys cannot. You are already emotionally invested in your LO, and your LO is already emotionally invested in you. You know your LO far better than I will ever know him - you can read him like a book. You know when he's feeling good about himself, and when he's feeling bad. You know when he's seeing things clearly and when he's talking out his ass. You know if he has a tendency to downward spiral and can work to head that off. You can prevent him from being stupid and confessing because he's pissed off, or because he's depressed, or because he just wants all of this to be over with right now. And you and only you can help him deal with his emotions so that he can make the decision that overall, is best for him. You can prevent him from making a decision based on a passing emotion, one that he'll regret the moment he's no longer frustrated or sick of county chow. Hell, I had a guy make a decision based solely on the fact that he wanted to get back to prison where things were much more interesting and not so slow. Was it the right decision? Probably not, but it was his decision and he's still living with it.

Minor Activist is right - my position is that you help me help your LO by making sure he's doing what's in his best interests - what's right for him. You support his decisions and help him maintain a positive attitude so that he can get the best result possible. Since your LO is going to trial, getting him in a good head space is critical - a jury will be seeing his demeanor, and demeanor many times is mood. If he's in a positive headspace, he presents better to the jury whether he testifies or not.

And, since your his LO, you help him dress for trial as most guys can't coordinate ties with shirts and suit jackets to save their lives. I can't do this either as I'm particularly challenged when it comes to color and pattern coordination.

Support him, let him make decisions that meet with his moral code, not yours. Help him see things clearly. Help him decompress, feel connected, feel relevant. Do what LO do because I cannot come close to doing those things for him.

Leave the law to the legal experts. I'll leave the love to you, the loved one.
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Old 07-18-2017, 04:22 PM
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Update: he won the case! So happy! The judge didn't find the story the Co's was saying credible and they were witnesses who saw my husband get assaulted by these Co's. I believe my husband wants to move foward with a suit for physical and psychological damage, is this a possible thing? If any of you have knowledge with these kind of things could you please shed some light on the matter. Thanks
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Old 07-18-2017, 06:18 PM
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Great news that your husband won his case against the odds since most judges & juries want to believe whatever the government employees tell them.

Suing the federal government has pluses, like deep pockets; and minuses, including unlimited resources and a huge number of lawyers already on the payroll. Talk to a number of attorneys in your area to decide if your case has a reasonable chance for success before you decide.
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Old 07-18-2017, 10:16 PM
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Update: he won the case! So happy! The judge didn't find the story the Co's was saying credible and they were witnesses who saw my husband get assaulted by these Co's. I believe my husband wants to move foward with a suit for physical and psychological damage, is this a possible thing? If any of you have knowledge with these kind of things could you please shed some light on the matter. Thanks


That is excellent news! The lawsuit thing....that's something to talk to a personal injury attorney about. But given how often inmates lose cases like this, to hear someone actually won....actually makes my day.

Very happy for you guys. There is justice in the world some time.

-E
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Old 07-19-2017, 09:47 AM
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Only a lawyer can answer your question.

In between conversations with lawyers, read up on "qualified immunity" so you'll be better prepared to understand a subject they're likely to bring up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qualified_immunity

Quote:
A government agent's liability in a federal civil rights lawsuit now no longer depends upon whether the defendant acted with "malice," but on whether a hypothetical reasonable person in the defendant's position would have known that his or her actions violated clearly established law.
See a lawyer's blog called The Volokh Conspiracy for examples of how this plays out in practice. Search it for the string "qualified immunity" and lots of things will come up.

I hope Federal judges are better than the West Virginia Supreme Court. They allowed qualified immunity to a jail guard who followed an inmate back from the shower and raped her 17 times. The state justices ruled that he was off the hook because he didn't know he wasn't supposed to do that, since there was no written rule against raping prisoners.

I hope you can and do succeed. Look for a lawyer who's handled cases against the BOP before.
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Old 08-06-2017, 02:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashnmario View Post
First and for most I'd like to thank whomever clicked into this forum, hopefully it will take me one step closer to my goal.
In the end of march beginning of April of 2016 my husband was assaulted by correctional officers and as a result was taken to medical attention for a broken jaw and broken ribs. He did what was correct within his rights and filed for a suit and now they're charging him with "assault on c.o" thus extending his sentence. He's taking it to trial because he knows he didn't do it. I'm worried and scared for him, his court appointed lawyer isn't helping much and the witnesses have been moved to different facilities making contact for the lawyer even harder. Any info or help would be highly appreciated. Thank you
I think you got a lot of bad advice in this thread. The single best advice anyone could have gave you was find and pay for an excellent attorney. Court appointed attorneys are often times the worst attorneys possible. IMO using a court appointed attorney is almost equal to pleading guilty.

If that weren't an option someone should have told you to have your husband write a letter to the attorney and cc you on it granting you full access to the attorney to discuss the case and representation. In that role, they should have advised you to ensure the attorney filed a thorough discovery request and allowed you as appointed investigator to read through it yourself. Had the attorney balked on any of this, you should have been advised to file FOIA requests for the evidence in the case yourself. They would have denied your request for open investigation and you would have sued them nonetheless and forced them to tell a judge why the information was not available to you if it was disclosed to your husbands attorney since in many states such a move is legally equal to making it public.

Yes, if the evidence supports it, your husband should sue the S out of them. To do it right, find the best civil attorney in your area. Do not settle for your cousins neighbors sisters brothers friends uncle. Find the best of the best. Make them take the case on contingency. Otherwise there's no case to be made.

Good luck.
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Old 08-06-2017, 02:46 PM
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How does one make somebody take a case?

"Make them take the case on contingency."
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Old 08-06-2017, 04:29 PM
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I think you got a lot of bad advice in this thread. The single best advice anyone could have gave you was find and pay for an excellent attorney. Court appointed attorneys are often times the worst attorneys possible. IMO using a court appointed attorney is almost equal to pleading guilty.

If that weren't an option someone should have told you to have your husband write a letter to the attorney and cc you on it granting you full access to the attorney to discuss the case and representation. In that role, they should have advised you to ensure the attorney filed a thorough discovery request and allowed you as appointed investigator to read through it yourself. Had the attorney balked on any of this, you should have been advised to file FOIA requests for the evidence in the case yourself. They would have denied your request for open investigation and you would have sued them nonetheless and forced them to tell a judge why the information was not available to you if it was disclosed to your husbands attorney since in many states such a move is legally equal to making it public.

Yes, if the evidence supports it, your husband should sue the S out of them. To do it right, find the best civil attorney in your area. Do not settle for your cousins neighbors sisters brothers friends uncle. Find the best of the best. Make them take the case on contingency. Otherwise there's no case to be made.

Good luck.
First off, you are a legal idiot.

btw, did you read that the OP's spouse actually won in court? Case over.

there's a separate thread about the civil case. read up on 1983 litigation, and then tell me how it's a contingency fee system, or how you can make anybody do anything

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Old 08-08-2017, 06:51 PM
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I think you got a lot of bad advice in this thread. The single best advice anyone could have gave you was find and pay for an excellent attorney. Court appointed attorneys are often times the worst attorneys possible. IMO using a court appointed attorney is almost equal to pleading guilty.
This isn't directly related to OP's post but I think it's important enough to kind of take a sidebar here and say...this is wrong.

In fact, if it weren't for the dedicated and diligent work of the San Bernardino County Public Defender's Office back in 2014 and again in mid-2016 when a sentencing issue came up, I am convinced that Dee would still be in prison, possibly for several more years. Over what amounts to a drug offense. And given the state of mind that she was in, she would have probably gone back to using and racked up several more. We have a saying about quite a few of the women in there with her....they were working on racking up life sentences by tacking on in-prison drug posession sentences, 2-4 years consecutively at a time. I know of one specific one who's picked up four seperate 4573.6 charges (that's the California Penal Code for an in-prison drug possession offense) who's managed to add about 15 years to her sentence CONSECUTIVE in the process. She was supposed to be out in 2015 and now her earliest possible outdate is something like 2026 and her max-out's in 2030. She's 44 years old now. Do the math. She would have been 42 and going out to a very nice guy who I met in visiting one time. Instead she'll be at least 53. And that assumes she doesn't pick up any more drug charges in prison. And two of those cases she had private counsel....looking at the deals she got, she actually got better deals with the Public Defender's Office.

Not all Public Defenders are created equal. Some are darn good at their jobs. And not everyone can afford to pay for an "excellent attorney." Many of those "excellent attorneys" you speak of got their start in one of the public offices (either the Public Defender's or in some cases the District Attorney's before switching over to criminal defense.) While the offices can be a bit taxed at times, Public Defenders are dedicated public servants who are dedicated to their jobs. I am yet to meet a public defender in Southern California that doesn't love the work that they do and who doesn't work hard to ensure justice for their clients.

I understand that in some jurisdictions the resources that are available to the PD's office in some of our local counties are not as readily available. But this is a gross over-generalization and an insult to many attorneys who work darn hard for their clients.

To the OP's topic....she was given excellent advice. Realistic advice. Advice that, once again, is similar to advice I was given when Dee had issues. And actually we did hire a private attorney, and a pretty good one, but we could only afford them "up to trial" which basically meant that once we got past the preliminary hearing and couldn't come up with about $15K just to retain (that was to start, didn't include if the case went beyond a certain length of time, the cost of any investigators and other filings, etc.) that attorney sub'd out again for the Public Defender's office when she was arraigned on the information. Did the Private Attorney help? Debateable. I thought they did a great job. But having been in court during the Preliminary Hearing, and having seen some of the Public Defenders from that particular office handle hearings and even a day of trial (the attorney that was appointed to her case after our private counsel was sub'd off was the one who handled that day of trial and she was superb,) I don't know that the job he did for us handling the preliminary was any better than what the Public Defender would have done.

If a future situation comes up, my advice to someone who's got the means to hire a private attorney through family assistance or whatnot would be to first research the quality of the Public Defender's office in their area. Hiring private might not always make a lot of difference. In some cases, given that Public Defenders often have good relationships with judges and the DA's office (depending on jurisdiction of course,) you might be better off sticking with the PD.
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Old 08-08-2017, 08:40 PM
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A thousand thanks to Missingdee, because every time somebody pipes up with the "PDs are the dregs" kind of comment, I just wanna retch! I have friends who are or have been PDs. They were diligent, intelligent and well-trained. They made the best of what were often bad cases, made even better if they actually had potential witnesses or facts to work with.

They are good lawyers. They're decent people. They take as much pride in their work as anyone should!
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Old 08-08-2017, 08:47 PM
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I agree with Dee and Nim!

And thank you to all the PDs that work long, hard hours!
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Old 08-08-2017, 08:58 PM
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This isn't directly related to OP's post but I think it's important enough to kind of take a sidebar here and say...this is wrong.

In fact, if it weren't for the dedicated and diligent work of the San Bernardino County Public Defender's Office back in 2014 and again in mid-2016 when a sentencing issue came up, I am convinced that Dee would still be in prison, possibly for several more years. Over what amounts to a drug offense. And given the state of mind that she was in, she would have probably gone back to using and racked up several more. We have a saying about quite a few of the women in there with her....they were working on racking up life sentences by tacking on in-prison drug posession sentences, 2-4 years consecutively at a time. I know of one specific one who's picked up four seperate 4573.6 charges (that's the California Penal Code for an in-prison drug possession offense) who's managed to add about 15 years to her sentence CONSECUTIVE in the process. She was supposed to be out in 2015 and now her earliest possible outdate is something like 2026 and her max-out's in 2030. She's 44 years old now. Do the math. She would have been 42 and going out to a very nice guy who I met in visiting one time. Instead she'll be at least 53. And that assumes she doesn't pick up any more drug charges in prison. And two of those cases she had private counsel....looking at the deals she got, she actually got better deals with the Public Defender's Office.

Not all Public Defenders are created equal. Some are darn good at their jobs. And not everyone can afford to pay for an "excellent attorney." Many of those "excellent attorneys" you speak of got their start in one of the public offices (either the Public Defender's or in some cases the District Attorney's before switching over to criminal defense.) While the offices can be a bit taxed at times, Public Defenders are dedicated public servants who are dedicated to their jobs. I am yet to meet a public defender in Southern California that doesn't love the work that they do and who doesn't work hard to ensure justice for their clients.

I understand that in some jurisdictions the resources that are available to the PD's office in some of our local counties are not as readily available. But this is a gross over-generalization and an insult to many attorneys who work darn hard for their clients.

To the OP's topic....she was given excellent advice. Realistic advice. Advice that, once again, is similar to advice I was given when Dee had issues. And actually we did hire a private attorney, and a pretty good one, but we could only afford them "up to trial" which basically meant that once we got past the preliminary hearing and couldn't come up with about $15K just to retain (that was to start, didn't include if the case went beyond a certain length of time, the cost of any investigators and other filings, etc.) that attorney sub'd out again for the Public Defender's office when she was arraigned on the information. Did the Private Attorney help? Debateable. I thought they did a great job. But having been in court during the Preliminary Hearing, and having seen some of the Public Defenders from that particular office handle hearings and even a day of trial (the attorney that was appointed to her case after our private counsel was sub'd off was the one who handled that day of trial and she was superb,) I don't know that the job he did for us handling the preliminary was any better than what the Public Defender would have done.

If a future situation comes up, my advice to someone who's got the means to hire a private attorney through family assistance or whatnot would be to first research the quality of the Public Defender's office in their area. Hiring private might not always make a lot of difference. In some cases, given that Public Defenders often have good relationships with judges and the DA's office (depending on jurisdiction of course,) you might be better off sticking with the PD.
I'm new to the forum and haven't reviewed your posting history. Thank you for letting me know there are dedicated and skilled public defenders. But I challenge you to ask any of them, if they were charged with a felony, what would they do. They will all tell you the following, "sell everything you have, charge up your credit cards to the max, and employ the absolute best attorney you can afford." I won't waste time spelling out the ROI.

Advising someone to take a public defender is tantamount to asking them to look at the brochure for the prison.

Let me be clear and unambiguous. You are severely misinformed. Yes, it's possible to have a good defense from public defender. Yes, it's possible to have
a horrible defense with a paid attorney. That's why everyone has to put in the effort to research who they hire before they hire them.

I know I'm coming across as rude. I apologize. You are a caring soul. But I've been through it. And I'm not going to let anyone muddy the waters.
  #21  
Old 08-08-2017, 09:05 PM
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I'm new to the forum and haven't reviewed your posting history. Thank you for letting me know there are dedicated and skilled public defenders. But I challenge you to ask any of them, if they were charged with a felony, what would they do. They will all tell you the following, "sell everything you have, charge up your credit cards to the max, and employ the absolute best attorney you can afford." I won't waste time spelling out the ROI.

Advising someone to take a public defender is tantamount to asking them to look at the brochure for the prison.

Let me be clear and unambiguous. You are severely misinformed. Yes, it's possible to have a good defense from public defender. Yes, it's possible to have
a horrible defense with a paid attorney. That's why everyone has to put in the effort to research who they hire before they hire them.

I know I'm coming across as rude. I apologize. You are a caring soul. But I've been through it. And I'm not going to let anyone muddy the waters.
Jwe, rest your case. You have NOTHING to prove.
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Old 08-08-2017, 09:14 PM
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Old 08-08-2017, 09:40 PM
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EVERYONE - No more bickering, keep to the topic at hand ONLY.

Sorry. OP's original post was open ended and I read what I thought was generically bad advice. Fortunately, OP's husband won the case.

At this point, the thread maybe should be closed to prevent further bickering. Up to you.
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Old 08-08-2017, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by JustWeirdEnough View Post
I'm new to the forum and haven't reviewed your posting history. Thank you for letting me know there are dedicated and skilled public defenders. But I challenge you to ask any of them, if they were charged with a felony, what would they do. They will all tell you the following, "sell everything you have, charge up your credit cards to the max, and employ the absolute best attorney you can afford." I won't waste time spelling out the ROI.



Advising someone to take a public defender is tantamount to asking them to look at the brochure for the prison.



Let me be clear and unambiguous. You are severely misinformed. Yes, it's possible to have a good defense from public defender. Yes, it's possible to have

a horrible defense with a paid attorney. That's why everyone has to put in the effort to research who they hire before they hire them.



I know I'm coming across as rude. I apologize. You are a caring soul. But I've been through it. And I'm not going to let anyone muddy the waters.


Respectfully...While I will concede that my knowledge of Public Defenders offices outside of my area is narrow, and I will point out I specifically discussed Southern California area PDs while acknowledging that the same resources are probably not available elsewhere....I am not misinformed on the issue.

Also, if I understand Mario's case, he had a public defender and the public defender won a case involving an in-prison charge at trial, which is not an easy task even with a paid attorney.

Of course, the truth is that oftentimes a person with a lot of financial resources can afford to pay for not only a private attorney but for them to utilize more resources. So I will concede that someone who has the financial resources to pay for a better defense has a chance at a better outcome.

But to me that is more a general social issue than an issue of the Public Defender being bad.

I'll end my sidebar on the topic with this thought.....it is true that generally speaking a Public Defender has a larger caseload and, generally speaking, does not have the amount of resources that private attorneys have. In some jurisdictions PD roles are generally covered by private attorneys paid on a case-by-case basis who have cases assigned to them as the county does not want to fund a formal PD's office or lacks the resources to do so. But as I said....not all PD offices are created equal and there are some that are, in fact, quite good. I've seen it work.

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Old 08-08-2017, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by JustWeirdEnough View Post
I'm new to the forum and haven't reviewed your posting history. Thank you for letting me know there are dedicated and skilled public defenders. But I challenge you to ask any of them, if they were charged with a felony, what would they do. They will all tell you the following, "sell everything you have, charge up your credit cards to the max, and employ the absolute best attorney you can afford." I won't waste time spelling out the ROI.

Advising someone to take a public defender is tantamount to asking them to look at the brochure for the prison.

Let me be clear and unambiguous. You are severely misinformed. Yes, it's possible to have a good defense from public defender. Yes, it's possible to have
a horrible defense with a paid attorney. That's why everyone has to put in the effort to research who they hire before they hire them.

I know I'm coming across as rude. I apologize. You are a caring soul. But I've been through it. And I'm not going to let anyone muddy the waters.
You are an asshat and know nothing about the public defender system in most counties around the US. you are amazingly judgemental with no real basis for understanding a damned thing about Gideon's Army or what a PD would do if charged with a crime.

If you want to keep slamming some of the best attorneys I've ever worked with, and I've never been a PD, then I'm going to be on your ass every step of the way.

And, research isn't everything. Especially by a supposed "expert" in FOIA who doesn't even know enough to know what an expert in any area of law takes.
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