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  #1  
Old 06-21-2011, 06:53 AM
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Default What degree can convicted felons actually use

I want to know is what degrees can imates actually use.
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Old 07-14-2011, 11:41 AM
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In california you can become a drug ad alcohol couselor if u are a fellon, however you can not have any sexual related convictions, but oter than that most agencies wil hire you. I am curently working at a place that is for incustody inmates and a lot of our staff are fellons.
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Old 07-14-2011, 01:36 PM
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anything not in criminal justice, convicted felon can study any program they wanted, just wouldnt get into criminal justice( u can study it but noone will hire you) keep thiose types of thigns in mind.
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Old 07-14-2011, 03:19 PM
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if the institution will let you study it, you can get the degree. The value of the degree depends on the market, as per anything else. You can even get a law degree, and provided you can pass the bar, you can work as a lawyer.

I'd stay away from Chemistry, physics, architecture, structural engineering and the like. But, since it's always of interest to inmates, a degree in nutrition may be interesting, and you can get work in all sorts of facilities ranging from summer camps to mental institutions to retirement homes. At the same time, you can do your papers on the nutritional value and components of the meals you obtain from your facility, as well as the nutritional value of those things available through commissary.

Other degrees to avoid include education for anybody convicted of a sex offense, or a crime of violence. However, you can get your doctoral, and work in a plethora of non school environments, including writing tests for national testing, curriculum reviews, and teaching at the college level.
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Old 07-24-2011, 01:22 AM
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You cannot get any degree in the medical field either as a convicted felon you will not be able to get licensed in any state.
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Old 07-24-2011, 12:05 PM
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You cannot get any degree in the medical field either as a convicted felon you will not be able to get licensed in any state.
ah, but licensing is different from getting the degree. If you really want a degree in a medical field, you need to talk with the medical field and then the licensing people in your state.

Here's what I know: it's harder, but not impossible to get a license. You need a lot of clean time, and a lot of people endorsing you, but generally, you can get a license. The big bug-a-boo concerns crimes of violence; but even then you may get around it and get licensed. If you can't in your state, you may want to check into working elsewhere - Doctors Without Borders, the UN, etc, etc, etc. You might have to spend a period of years licensed outside the US doing interviews of survivors of human rights abuses, but at least you'll be practicing in an area you've trained for.

But, if you want to stay in this country and do something in medicine, your best bet is to get a research degree, and not licensed to practice.
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Old 07-28-2011, 09:08 AM
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With the vast array of degrees available that is really too general of a question to answer completely. Having a degree on one discipline does not exclude you from a career in another. It depends on the goals of an individual as well. For instance, if a person just wanted to be employable, then that person would want a degree in a field where their background will not be an too great an obstacle. Where I am employed there was a minimum degree requirement which I met thanks to my prison education. The requirement was for a degree in applied electronics, mine was a computer science degree in information technology. They accepted it. Lots of variables, but the bottom line for me is if you are wanting to become employable then the more education you have the better.
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Old 08-04-2011, 05:22 AM
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electronics, computer technology, it systems, study accounting--learn to process W7 forms and you can work as a tax preparer with steady income year round. you can do consultant work on your own or go vocational and study business management and go into business for yourself laying carpet, landscaping. and there are firms that will hire you as a paralegal...depends on the state you're in for licenses, second chance programs, etc. study a language and be a translator--huge demand for bilingual interpreters.
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:50 PM
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ah, but licensing is different from getting the degree. If you really want a degree in a medical field, you need to talk with the medical field and then the licensing people in your state.

Here's what I know: it's harder, but not impossible to get a license. You need a lot of clean time, and a lot of people endorsing you, but generally, you can get a license. The big bug-a-boo concerns crimes of violence; but even then you may get around it and get licensed. If you can't in your state, you may want to check into working elsewhere - Doctors Without Borders, the UN, etc, etc, etc. You might have to spend a period of years licensed outside the US doing interviews of survivors of human rights abuses, but at least you'll be practicing in an area you've trained for.

But, if you want to stay in this country and do something in medicine, your best bet is to get a research degree, and not licensed to practice.


In the state of Michigan when you apply to law, nursing or medical school they do a background check on you. If you have even a misdemeanor you will not be accepted in the program, therefore you would not be able to obtain a degree.
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Old 08-27-2011, 06:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nireda

In the state of Michigan when you apply to law, nursing or medical school they do a background check on you. If you have even a misdemeanor you will not be accepted in the program, therefore you would not be able to obtain a degree.
That is why I stated no medical field. I am a nurse and if you don't pass background check no getting into a program...and even without any offenses there are waiting lists from 1-5 years to get into nursing programs here!
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Old 08-28-2011, 04:41 PM
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In the state of Michigan when you apply to law, nursing or medical school they do a background check on you. If you have even a misdemeanor you will not be accepted in the program, therefore you would not be able to obtain a degree.
Every state level law license I've ever applied for has required a background check. That background check includes filling out information on pages that stack to more than half an inch thick. So, I've had to cop to each and every crime I've ever committed to each and every bar. Granted, my crimes are at most simple misdemeanors - in Iowa speeding is punishable by 1-3 months in jail as a simple misdemeanor. I had a failure to stop at a stop sign on a bicycle in CA way back when, but I've had to cop to that, too.

Now, when I was in law school, a couple of students had problems. One got a DUI. Another got into a fight at a football game. Charges were pressed, and both plead out. They notified the bar when they were arrested. The bar worked with them, and both were eventually licensed after passing the regular, academic part of the bar, and getting their JD.

While I've never bothered with Michigan, I know felons in WI, IL, IA, MA, FL, CA, and CO who have law licenses. So, go figure. From the interior, you can become a lawyer with a felony in your background.

I've had clients who've had nursing licenses and other healthcare type licenses. You can have a license if you have a felony. You will have problems, and hoops to jump through, but you can get and keep a license with a felony. The exceptions are violent felonies, sexual felonies, and some drug cases. Each state and each licensing board is different, but there's no blanket exclusion from licensing if you have a criminal record.

So, if you want a particular career, and you know you have a red flag in your background, you need to talk to the people who do the licensing in your state. If you run into a roadblock there, try another state.

And, there are law schools that will accept you and teach you even if there's a good chance that you won't be able to get a license. So, again, you need to talk with the licensing board in your intended field in your intended state.

Further, if you have a degree, and lose your license, you can still work in other countries or organizations that deal with health and welfare concerns in other countries. Doctors Without Boarders, the UN, Human Rights Watch, and plenty of other organizations need people who know what they're doing to go and help people in other countries. Want to work in counseling? Go spend a couple of years taking witness statements from war crime survivors in refugee camps. Want to work in nursing? Go spend a few years doing basic health services to native populations along the Amazon river.

If you want to do something, you'll find a way, no matter what some idiot in an administrations office says somewhere.

Do believe Kaplan University is still offering online JD degrees. They're national. My law degree from a school in FL is more than enough to let me make an application to get a MI law license, should I ever want one. Further, I already have federal licenses, so I can always go to MI to work in the federal courts, whether MI likes it or not.
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Old 10-02-2011, 07:40 PM
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If I could do things over, I would go for electrical engineering. If I failed, the experience would tie in to a free apprenticeship at an electrical union. They can make $70,000 easy with experience. Some of these people become project managers or go higher. And at the union they train people in a way that they learn the trade without getting esoteric. I would still study language and business law at some point but even with demand, salaries vary by language for translators. The best way to choose might be to ask the guidance counselor for the salary stats for each major and type of engineering. I think they have it and you already know some majors that require a background check.

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Old 10-06-2011, 10:42 PM
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Every state level law license I've ever applied for has required a background check. That background check includes filling out information on pages that stack to more than half an inch thick. So, I've had to cop to each and every crime I've ever committed to each and every bar. Granted, my crimes are at most simple misdemeanors - in Iowa speeding is punishable by 1-3 months in jail as a simple misdemeanor. I had a failure to stop at a stop sign on a bicycle in CA way back when, but I've had to cop to that, too.

Now, when I was in law school, a couple of students had problems. One got a DUI. Another got into a fight at a football game. Charges were pressed, and both plead out. They notified the bar when they were arrested. The bar worked with them, and both were eventually licensed after passing the regular, academic part of the bar, and getting their JD.

While I've never bothered with Michigan, I know felons in WI, IL, IA, MA, FL, CA, and CO who have law licenses. So, go figure. From the interior, you can become a lawyer with a felony in your background.

I've had clients who've had nursing licenses and other healthcare type licenses. You can have a license if you have a felony. You will have problems, and hoops to jump through, but you can get and keep a license with a felony. The exceptions are violent felonies, sexual felonies, and some drug cases. Each state and each licensing board is different, but there's no blanket exclusion from licensing if you have a criminal record.

So, if you want a particular career, and you know you have a red flag in your background, you need to talk to the people who do the licensing in your state. If you run into a roadblock there, try another state.

And, there are law schools that will accept you and teach you even if there's a good chance that you won't be able to get a license. So, again, you need to talk with the licensing board in your intended field in your intended state.

Further, if you have a degree, and lose your license, you can still work in other countries or organizations that deal with health and welfare concerns in other countries. Doctors Without Boarders, the UN, Human Rights Watch, and plenty of other organizations need people who know what they're doing to go and help people in other countries. Want to work in counseling? Go spend a couple of years taking witness statements from war crime survivors in refugee camps. Want to work in nursing? Go spend a few years doing basic health services to native populations along the Amazon river.

If you want to do something, you'll find a way, no matter what some idiot in an administrations office says somewhere.

Do believe Kaplan University is still offering online JD degrees. They're national. My law degree from a school in FL is more than enough to let me make an application to get a MI law license, should I ever want one. Further, I already have federal licenses, so I can always go to MI to work in the federal courts, whether MI likes it or not.

I was not speaking about getting licensed in a state, I was being particular about getting into a specific program. Clearly, if you have finished law school and passed the bar then MI would allow you to become licensed in this state. However, in MI, when you APPLY to law, nursing and medical schools, you are automatically denied admission into the program if you do not pass the background check.
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Old 10-09-2011, 04:51 PM
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Default Engineering is the future

Not wanting to be a fly in the ointment, but that guy Michael Savage on the radio has a PhD in Nutrition and no college would hire him because of affirmative action he says. But I guess there are other options. Engineering is an excellent choice if you study hard with the tutorial hour and even if the government officialy interferes with your employment, which happens, any factory would love to pay you great money and likely overlook a rap sheet. "Don't take Physics, chemistry, or structural engineering"? Physics was my favorite and most useful science class. I learned how air is pressurized in coils to heat it and then fans blowing the heat away create refrigeration, or how a large tank of fluid with great surface area is pressurized to force fluid in a very narrow pipe to lift a car, (hydraulic principles). Just because it might have a chapter on atomic priciples doesn't mean some ex-con is going to have 40 million Dollars, a team of Pakistani scientists, and some rocks from Africa to wreak havoc. Chemistry teaches information that can be used for good or evil, but if someone wanted to do evil they could go to the library tonight.

It is like when California wanted to outlaw SCUBA diving for ex-cons. Anyone in the water leaves giant tell-tale bubbles that can be seen unless they spend $10,000 on a closed-circuit system. It was a bill to try to vindictively attack an ex-con who was training as a diver. (That can be illegal by the way to pass a law with specific intent of retribution without cause. See Minneapolis Star Tribune vs. Commissioner 1983). It is still legal to educate yourself-make it count. If one takes any wage, I dont think a person will ever be without work in engineering.

A class in management itself could be helpful. Business Law should be a must for everyone. But I had near perfect grades and good accounting classes in California. People would tell me "You interview very well". I went to a great school. And I think while on parole I was prevented from working in that field. Later I kind of tricked my way into jobs through referrals where they hadn't looked deeply in the past. Honestly, a lot of business management jobs just have you keep journals which is fairly simple. (Running tallies of expenses and income) and the rest is sent quarterly to a tax preparer who organizes everything for you sometimes for over $100 a month ten years ago. If you have technical ability, a desk job and business accumen can come later.

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Old 10-09-2011, 05:09 PM
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Default Law School Correspondence

If you study law, be sure you check your state's requirements before taking correspondence courses. I know California accepts Approved correspondence schools only, but most won't even do that. Forgive my typos, I am using a smartphone keyboard and I can't see pages well.
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Old 12-02-2011, 02:50 PM
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You can't work in nursing homes or mental institutions with a criminal record.
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Old 12-13-2011, 06:27 PM
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how do states expect people in jail to change if they take everything away from you
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Old 07-25-2012, 04:08 PM
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You cannot get any degree in the medical field either as a convicted felon you will not be able to get licensed in any state.
You have no idea what you are talking about. The board of nursing takes every request for any medical license on a case by case basis. To tell someone that they cannot get in the medical field with a felony is wrong. I am in the process of obtaining my nursing license and I have a drug felony. I will get my license to practice nursing. Its no walk in the park to do it but it will happen. please research your answers before you tell people wrong information.
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Old 07-27-2012, 03:13 AM
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On a similar note, I have information from the United Kingdom re: degrees and people with criminal records (the UK does not have a misdemeanor/felony type system, unlike the USA).

Some professions requiring a degree are exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, which allows the various professional bodies in the United Kingdom to check for spent convictions as well as unspent convictions, or convictions that cannot be spent (i.e. those resulting in a prison sentence of more than 30 months).

The 16 exempted professions in the UK,according to this act, are:
Medical practitioners,solicitors,accountants,dentists,vete rinary surgeons,nursing professions (includes nurses and midwives),opticians,pharmaceutical chemists,teachers,osteopaths,chiropractors,psychol ogists,actuaries, barristers, social workers and social service workers.

With regards to specific offences, in the UK it is basically impossible to practice law or join the police force if you have a criminal record, and if you are working with children or vulnerable adults this will also not be possible if you have been convicted of a violent or sexual offence,particularly against a child or vulnerable adult. I am sure you also cannot work as an actuary if you have been convicted of fraud, serious theft,or related financial offences. As for the other exempted professions and occupations, it would be very difficult in practice to be accepted as a member of one of them if you have several recent convictions or one or two serious ones of a violent nature.

A lot of degrees can still be studied and completed usefully by prisoners and ex-prisoners (criminal records not leading ever to a custodial sentence are not significant in the UK for the most part when it comes to employment), so there is no need for them to despair!

Please look up the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act (United Kingdom) 1974 to understand what I am talking about.
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Old 08-04-2012, 06:50 PM
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I was not speaking about getting licensed in a state, I was being particular about getting into a specific program. Clearly, if you have finished law school and passed the bar then MI would allow you to become licensed in this state. However, in MI, when you APPLY to law, nursing and medical schools, you are automatically denied admission into the program if you do not pass the background check.
MI law schools would be quite odd if they excluded people from applying. Further, due to reciprocity, graduation from ANY ABA approved law school forms the basis for sitting for the bar in any state. So, if the school you want to go to is that bigoted, and you're going to let that one school stop you from getting a JD, then clearly the law is not a career for you. I went to school in FL. I'm licensed in IL and IA. Granted, I do not have a criminal background (beyond a few speeding tickets - a simple misdemeanor in Iowa). I do know a few convicted felons who've taken JD degrees and gone on to get admitted in a variety of jurisdictions. But, then, most people don't have their heart set on going to Michigan State or whatever school you're claiming won't accept you into its law class.
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Old 08-04-2012, 06:59 PM
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I was not speaking about getting licensed in a state, I was being particular about getting into a specific program. Clearly, if you have finished law school and passed the bar then MI would allow you to become licensed in this state. However, in MI, when you APPLY to law, nursing and medical schools, you are automatically denied admission into the program if you do not pass the background check.
Oh, and I took a brief look at the admissions ap for Michigan and Michigan State. they don't ask about felonies.
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Old 11-07-2012, 12:02 PM
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My son wanted to be a rad tech. he was told he could do all the schooling he wanted to do but would not get certified just because of the charge and it was not even a drug related charge
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Old 11-08-2012, 03:24 PM
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My son wanted to be a rad tech. he was told he could do all the schooling he wanted to do but would not get certified just because of the charge and it was not even a drug related charge
never rely on what one person tells you. If there's certification involved, look at what's written about certification. Realize those certification requirements change state to state. Go from there. Never be dissuaded by one bureaucrat with an agenda.
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:02 PM
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never rely on what one person tells you. If there's certification involved, look at what's written about certification. Realize those certification requirements change state to state. Go from there. Never be dissuaded by one bureaucrat with an agenda.

I wish my son would really go to school and do what he wants.We went to the local college in the city we moved to and that is where he got his information.I dont want him to pay all that money for nothing.
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Old 11-29-2012, 01:09 PM
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You have no idea what you are talking about. The board of nursing takes every request for any medical license on a case by case basis. To tell someone that they cannot get in the medical field with a felony is wrong. I am in the process of obtaining my nursing license and I have a drug felony. I will get my license to practice nursing. Its no walk in the park to do it but it will happen. please research your answers before you tell people wrong information.

I agree with the above post. In Florida you can get a license as a nurse if you have had several years, 10 specifically, of time since your offense and you meet with the board. I have a friend who is a pharmacist and was convicted of a drug charge and was just informed he would be able to eventually get his license back. This comes straight from the nursing board here. I did plenty of research when I decided to enroll in school and choosing my major. I contacted schools, licensing boards, and HR reps. it is not impossible to get a job once you are a convicted felon, you just need to demonstrate that you have changed and that you are committed to succeeding by acquiring exceptional grades in school. For someone just to say NO you can’t do that without knowing is wrong and discouraging to others. I eventually decided on Biology so that I can pursue graduate work in science. I will quote the Internship Coordinator from UF. It may be difficult for you Melissa but it will not be impossible....Another thing to consider...I just did a background check for my current job and I passed with flying colors and I have a grand theft charge from 2000. Most larger companies only go back 7 to 10 years...best way to find out if you will pass one, have a comprehensive background check done on yourself...
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