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  #1  
Old 01-26-2011, 05:49 PM
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Default The Super Intensive Supervision Program In The State Of Texas-Part I

Leaving the Walls in Huntsville, Oct ‘09
I didn’t have a clue that the next year of my life would involve the most intense form of supervision in the history of parole in the state of Texas until about 20 minutes before I was released from the Walls in Huntsville. I thought that the monitor they would be putting on my ankle when we dressed out before leaving was to be on for 2-3 months or so and then taken off. It didn’t fully register in my mind that I’d be wearing a passive GPS monitor until I got home from Huntsville. That’s when it hit me as to what this is all about. The parole board made the decision to handle me in a way I’d never been forced to adhere to before. The SISP parole officer assigned to me brought the base unit and the monitor to the residence I stay at and attached it to the phone line I had to have set up in order to get out on parole. The monitor weighs 1.5 lbs and is 2”x 3 ½” x 4 ½” in size. That may not seem like much, but when you consider that you have to wear or keep it within 25 ft. of you when you leave your residence for at least the next 365 days believe me, its almost like carrying around an Olympic sized shot-put some days. Before I re-entered TDCJ for a state jail felony followed by a 2 year parole violation, I’d been on medium supervision. All that changed when I got out this time.

SISP Law Changes & Who is Eligible
What started out as House Bill 2918 in 1997 under the 75th Legislature was designed to monitor certain sex offenders upon release from TDCJ on parole. At some point between 1999 and 2005 those convicted of violent crimes and 3g offenses became candidates for SISP. Effective September 1st, 2009 that was further expanded to anyone who is a confirmed member of:

d. Is a member of an organized prison gang including:
(1) Mexican Mafia (EME), AKA Mexikanemi (EMI),
(2) Texas Syndicate,
(3) Barrio Azteca,
(4) Aryan Brotherhood of Texas,
(5) Aryan Circle,
(6) Hermanos de Latino Pistoleros,
(7) Raza Unida,
(8) Texas Mafia,
(9) Crips,
(10) Bloods,
(11) Texas Chicano Brotherhood,
(12) Partido Revolucion Mexicano,
(13) Any other organized prison gang identified by CID as a security threat group;
SISP Origins
It’s been said that the initial idea of tracking individuals by way of radio frequency was 1st born in a comic book series based on Spiderman. When I actually read that I thought to myself “say what??!!”, but stranger things have happened. Around 1984 Judge Jack Love of New Mexico was the first person to use radio frequencies combined with telephone land lines to monitor people on probation and parole. Here in Texas that technology is referred to as electronic monitoring in parole lingo and has been in wide use for a number of years. Most electronic monitoring programs where parole is concerned are usually 2-3 months upon release. Some may be as long as 6 months. Intensive Supervision and some Maximum Supervision parolees are the one’s to be found who wear that type of ankle monitor that usually provides a 7am-7pm window to go by during the day. Their movements can be tracked by a field officer who drives by the scheduled site someone is supposed to be at and shoots a signal or beam with a type of tracking device that interacts with the ankle monitor worn and determines whether or not the parolee is actually where they’re scheduled to be.
When Texas created SISP in 1997, the use of global positioning satellite (GPS) systems was put in place. This allows the whereabouts of someone to be tracked by satellite with the type of monitor I spoke of earlier. When you return home for the day and place the monitor back in the base unit connected to the phone line that’s been approved through parole, the info is uploaded through the phone line to the command center in Austin revealing where someone has been since they left their residence. While at home the ankle bracelet I wear keeps track of me and interacts with the passive GPS unit connected to the phone line.
Since then, technological advances have now come up with active GPS systems that enable the use of wireless transmissions and are also in use among some who are on SISP. They are not as common and are more expensive to the state for usage and upkeep. Passive GPS systems cost around $5.00 per day while Active GPS systems are somewhere around $10.00 per day.
Pro Tech is the Odessa, Florida based provider of the GPS systems and tracking devices used within SISP here in Texas. They have a catalog of what the monitors look like and the different types. Those of us on SISP pay $18.00 in parole fees like everyone else on parole. There are no extra fees to be paid with the exception of a monthly phone bill for the land line required for installation of a passive GPS system at one’s residence. The land line must be bare with no custom calling or added features.

Scheduling and What is Permissible
Those of us who are on SISP have to report once a week or once every 2 weeks until we are approved for a lower level of supervision by the SISP panel in Austin composed of 3 parole board members or discharge our sentence on parole or go back to prison for a parole violation or new conviction. You request the addresses or places you need to go to for a 7 day period when you report each week and a schedule is set up that provides time to get to your destination, time for the actual activity itself (work, church, doctor, grocery store shopping, etc.) and time to get back home. The SISP officer assigned to you documents the schedule in the computer and makes 2 copies of the schedule. One is given to the parolee and the SISP officer keeps the other one. Under SISP there are only 7 authorized activities permitted you in terms of movement or where you can go:

1. Seek Employment: Monday thru Friday and offenders are to provide location information.

2. Maintain Employment: With US approval for Non-Sex Offenders only the “Motion No GPS” alert may be temporarily disabled for offenders that work in an environment that requires offender to be in motion without the ability of gaining GPS.
NOTE: The Motion no GPS alarm shall only be disabled for time the offender scheduled to be at work.

3. Approved Counseling or Education Programs.

4. Religious Services: Sex Offenders can not attend until a high risk plan is coordinated with sex offender therapist.

5. Daily Living Needs: Do not include recreational or entertainment activities. Activities related to housework (e.g. cutting yard, painting the house) shall be staffed with US for approval. A US may approve activities related to life changing events (e.g. funeral, birth of their child).

6. Medical, Dental, Legal Appointments or to respond to Medical Emergencies:
Offenders that are the primary caretaker for individual residing to the same household may be granted time to attend appointments. In case of emergency where offender stay is overnight, SISP officer shall notify Hospital Security to advise what type of supervision offender is under.

7. District Parole Officer Appointments.
Some times you can have an adjustment made to your weekly schedule after it has been submitted for the week, but that is only sometimes. SISP parole officers have a more intense schedule to keep up with than most other parole officers. They are on call 24/7. Subsequently, they spend a lot of time actually looking in on people away from the parole office. All home visits on SISP are random and done once a week.
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Old 01-29-2011, 10:31 PM
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Thank you for this very useful post as my man meets the criteria for this type of supervision. He does not believe he will have to do this IF he EVER gets out on parole anyway. But it sounds like its such a huge pain.

How long can/do they keep you on this SISP level??

Thanks again for this useful information
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Old 01-30-2011, 06:34 AM
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Thank you for this very useful post as my man meets the criteria for this type of supervision. He does not believe he will have to do this IF he EVER gets out on parole anyway. But it sounds like its such a huge pain.

How long can/do they keep you on this SISP level??

Thanks again for this useful information
A minimum of 1 year. It usually takes 60-90 days to be voted on by the parole division and the 3 member SISP panel composed of the parole board members. If you denied release from SISP upon review, it's another year that you have to do. By the time I come up for review again based on how long it took them to vote this first time, I will have been on it about 2 1/2 years.
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Old 02-10-2011, 08:51 PM
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A minimum of 1 year. It usually takes 60-90 days to be voted on by the parole division and the 3 member SISP panel composed of the parole board members. If you denied release from SISP upon review, it's another year that you have to do. By the time I come up for review again based on how long it took them to vote this first time, I will have been on it about 2 1/2 years.
Ok I am a bit confused... my son just made parole. FI-1 His max out date in prison was march 2012. (on 4 years) He is not a SO or a member of any gang or affiliated. His charge was not 3g according to the atty. Although he did not good tim etc. the parole sent him a letter staing that he did get parole FI-1 and that he should be on a monitor and could be up to 90 to 180 days. also he has drug classes. And could not contact anyone involved. He was in for possesion of meth the smallest amount possible. And robbery with bodily injury. (his friend got into a fight that night)
and they guy whose house it was at tried to talk my son into selling some drugs he refused and then his friend got mad and hit the guy and they left. he then cried robbery cause he was a nark (his step dad was a cop). 3 days later he was arrested with 3 citys involved in the bust. they busted in on my house like he was a big time criminal. What could be going on??
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Old 02-10-2011, 11:17 PM
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Anyone on the monitor for 2-3 months is in a different situation than someone on SISP. I’ve been on the monitor that they’re talking about applying to your son’s situation. It is an ankle monitor type setup that also involves the use of a telephone land line like what is seen in most SISP situations, but it is considerably less restrictive. Most of the time they have a 7 am to 7 pm window that they to work with in terms of being in and out of the house. Technically, there is supposed to be a field officer that randomly drives around and checks to see if a person is where they’re supposed to be at a certain time, but many times parole is understaffed in order to do this. As long as you leave & return home on time and go where you’re supposed to, 90% of the time the monitor comes off at the end of 60-90 days.
Monitoring has become more popular with time in many states. It frees up parole officers to where they can do more and yet have some accuracy about what’s going on with a parolee.
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Old 02-11-2011, 05:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Firebrand View Post
Anyone on the monitor for 2-3 months is in a different situation than someone on SISP. I’ve been on the monitor that they’re talking about applying to your son’s situation. It is an ankle monitor type setup that also involves the use of a telephone land line like what is seen in most SISP situations, but it is considerably less restrictive. Most of the time they have a 7 am to 7 pm window that they to work with in terms of being in and out of the house. Technically, there is supposed to be a field officer that randomly drives around and checks to see if a person is where they’re supposed to be at a certain time, but many times parole is understaffed in order to do this. As long as you leave & return home on time and go where you’re supposed to, 90% of the time the monitor comes off at the end of 60-90 days.
Monitoring has become more popular with time in many states. It frees up parole officers to where they can do more and yet have some accuracy about what’s going on with a parolee.
Oh thank God. I was really freaking out on the monitor thing. He said he can handle it he just wants to be home. But that SISP monitor is very radical. those men have to walk a very then line. I feel for them. At least most of them are home with thier loved ones, so that part is good. Thank you for your help your post are always full of useful information and We really do appreciate you.
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Old 02-12-2011, 08:38 PM
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When I reported to my PO last week, I joked with her that I had just seen her supervisor and asked her why her supervisor was mad at her?

She replied, "How do you know she's mad at me?"

I said, "Because she just told me that she's putting you on SISP caseload."

(All of this is bs, I was just pulling her chain)

She then got a little serious and said, "Actually, I would prefer to be on specialized caseload rather than regular caseload." (She use to handle sex offender caseload).

Of course, I had to ask why as I had read all of Firebrand's posts regarding SISP and it sounded like it would be a pain in the (a**) to be on SISP and be the SISP parole officer.

Her replied was as follows: "Because it's easy to get warrants on specialized caseloads. I don't have to fight with those folks for a warrant like I do with regular caseloads. I ask for warrant on SISP, I have it in less than hour. No questions asked."

I tell folks all the time that parole is a cakewalk compared to probation. It's a cakewalk....unless you're on SISP or EM. Then, you're screwed.

Last edited by jobezee1; 02-12-2011 at 08:39 PM..
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Old 02-13-2011, 05:55 AM
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Originally Posted by jobezee1 View Post
When I reported to my PO last week, I joked with her that I had just seen her supervisor and asked her why her supervisor was mad at her?

She replied, "How do you know she's mad at me?"

I said, "Because she just told me that she's putting you on SISP caseload."

(All of this is bs, I was just pulling her chain)

She then got a little serious and said, "Actually, I would prefer to be on specialized caseload rather than regular caseload." (She use to handle sex offender caseload).

Of course, I had to ask why as I had read all of Firebrand's posts regarding SISP and it sounded like it would be a pain in the (a**) to be on SISP and be the SISP parole officer.

Her replied was as follows: "Because it's easy to get warrants on specialized caseloads. I don't have to fight with those folks for a warrant like I do with regular caseloads. I ask for warrant on SISP, I have it in less than hour. No questions asked."

I tell folks all the time that parole is a cakewalk compared to probation. It's a cakewalk....unless you're on SISP or EM. Then, you're screwed.
So, that’s what you have for a parole officer, huh? Sounds like she has the heart of a true “hater” with talk like that, Jobezee1. I feel for you. Overall and for the most part, I think those of us who are on SISP for violent offenses are given more freedom and leniency than someone who has committed a sex offense, but it also has a lot to do with how you handle yourself. I’ve had at least 4 warrants put out for my arrest in the time that I’ve been SISP and I didn’t know it until some time afterwards several months down the road when it simply came up in a random conversation. The first person to make the decision about how a warrant is handled is the SISP parole officer someone reports to and there are many warrants issued that are removed or not carried out. Just depends on the situation and what your relationship is with the person you report to. They can stick it to you if they want to and that’s why it’s important to always be on good terms with them. More often than not, going by the rules and doing what you’re supposed to carries the most weight as to what happens when a warrant is issued.

Sometimes a warrant can be issued because of a mistake made on their part when they enter a schedule into the computer that the Command Center in Austin goes by when monitoring someone. If it’s not entered properly where the times that a person can leave home or come home correctly then, a warrant is usually issued as a result and the SISP parole officer has the responsibility of stopping the warrant or allowing it to go through.

It’s always best to keep your schedule simple and without a lot of places to go to through out the week. The more addresses you put down and the time frames listed to go somewhere and leave there, the more room for error is created in which a mistake in communication can be made that puts you in a position where you cannot protect yourself. Overall, that doesn’t happen as much as it could, but the reason why it does happen is because of adjustments that are sometimes made throughout the week if you have a parole officer that will allow you to add to or make an adjustment to your schedule that have not been entered into the system properly. Some POs will only allow you to go by the schedule that you submit to them when you report weekly at the district parole office. Some POs will allow you to call them and make an adjustment to the schedule that has already been submitted in which they go into the computer and make an adjustment.

What SISP was designed to do in the beginning when it was created in 1997 and what it has become 14 years later in some ways, is not the same. It was a way of monitoring and dealing with the worst of the worst where sex offenses were concerned, but with the high recidivism rate, it has allowed for those of us who have been to prison more than once to be handled differently. I wasn’t really put on SISP because of the robberies I pulled; I was put on SISP because I wouldn’t do what I was supposed to do out here on parole and went back for a parole violation. The only people they can put the SISP stipulation on are sex offenders, violent offenders, and confirmed gang members in prison. My offense that I’m on parole for took place over 14 years ago and I have not done anything in any way that would indicate I’m still of the mindset, but the bottom line is there are a number of us in that same situation who the parole board and the parole division are tired of seeing go back to prison for any reason. They could have left me in there to finish my time instead of this route so…in the end who is to blame and which one of the 2 alternatives is worse? It’s all on me.

SISP is difficult and that’s no joke, but for the most part all of the people that I have interacted with who are a part of the parole division have been considerate of me. Doing time in prison is much the same effort to be seen out here on parole. It has more to do with the way you carry yourself and the way that others perceive you. If you’re a smuck then chances are you’ll be treated like a smuck. If you walk with grace and dignity then you receive grace and dignity. The meaning of grace to me is patience, tolerance, and the willingness to humble yourself when it’s not always easy to do so.
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Old 02-13-2011, 08:19 AM
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Well Firebrand, she's really not that bad. I think that she has just grown cynical and somewhat pessimistic in her job. She's been a PO for 10 years. She used to handle sex offender cases exclusively and is still the trainer with regards to these caseloads. Many times when I am in her office, I'm at a loss as to what kind of conversation to have with her. Once, I asked about any bizarre situations that she came across when she was a SO officer. She described, in detail that was a little too graphic for me, how she caught a guy on an unscheduled home visit doing things with a turkey that would frighten fish. I'll leave that to your imagination.

She's been a little more edgy on my last two reports because the folks in front of me were getting chewed out. Upon entering her office when reporting last week, she was fumigating the chairs and the air. Apparently, she and the unit supervisor had just finished up an "intervention" with a guy who was screwing up big time and hadn't bathed in a couple of weeks. She remarked to me, "I didn't mean to make him cry, but someone has to get through to him."

In January, she was fluttered because of the excuse that the gal in front of me gave for testing positive for cocaine. "She actually wanted me to believe that she was positive because her boyfriend put cocaine on her vagina before sex." No, I am not making this up.

With excuses like these, and I am sure she has heard some that are even more outlandish than that, I can't necessarily blame her for being a little cynical. She expects to be lied to, deceived, and manipulated. She has told me, though, that "I know all the excuses. I've heard all the stories. They think they're going to come in here and fool me. They can't. I've heard it all at least 100 times."

Now, you might ask, why does she confide any of this in me? Well, for all I know, she does the same with everybody. She's very blunt and honest. I do notice that she is a little more relaxed with older men (35+) who have already been down a couple of times and who are minding their P's and Q's here on the outside. "Ya'll are easier. You know the game and it's starting to wear ya'll out. These younger guys still have the energy and the attitude. They're playing for keeps. I tell them that they're going to wind up dead. I lose a couple of guys off my caseload every year through death. They overdose or get shot."

Really, I have to say that most of her insight is dead-on. I'd be willing to bet that most of her older parolees who have been through the system a couple of times, played the game, hustled, whatever you want to call it - would agree with most of her assessments. One does get tired of it. Considering that many of us smoked dope, drank, and engaged in other risky behaviors that were not conducive to our health, someone who is 35 will likely have the health of someone in their 40s who never smoked dope or anything like that.

Just from my experience and those that I've seen, I'd say age 35 or so is the tipping point for most folks. They either straighten up (at least to a level that is functional in society) or they go down with a life in the penitentiary or an early grave, some maybe a few years earlier depending on how much they've worn out their bodies and minds. Certainly, there are exceptions; I understand that. Would anyone agree or disagree?

(I might need to post this one in the Straight Talk section for Offenders)

Last edited by jobezee1; 02-13-2011 at 08:23 AM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 02-13-2011, 04:26 PM
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I would hope that age is not a deterent to progress or the ability to stay out. I didn't go to prison until I was almost 30 so, I've been some what of a late bloomer.
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Old 10-26-2013, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Firebrand View Post
Leaving the Walls in Huntsville, Oct ‘09
I didn’t have a clue that the next year of my life would involve the most intense form of supervision in the history of parole in the state of Texas until about 20 minutes before I was released from the Walls in Huntsville. I thought that the monitor they would be putting on my ankle when we dressed out before leaving was to be on for 2-3 months or so and then taken off. It didn’t fully register in my mind that I’d be wearing a passive GPS monitor until I got home from Huntsville. That’s when it hit me as to what this is all about. The parole board made the decision to handle me in a way I’d never been forced to adhere to before. The SISP parole officer assigned to me brought the base unit and the monitor to the residence I stay at and attached it to the phone line I had to have set up in order to get out on parole. The monitor weighs 1.5 lbs and is 2”x 3 ½” x 4 ½” in size. That may not seem like much, but when you consider that you have to wear or keep it within 25 ft. of you when you leave your residence for at least the next 365 days believe me, its almost like carrying around an Olympic sized shot-put some days. Before I re-entered TDCJ for a state jail felony followed by a 2 year parole violation, I’d been on medium supervision. All that changed when I got out this time.

SISP Law Changes & Who is Eligible
What started out as House Bill 2918 in 1997 under the 75th Legislature was designed to monitor certain sex offenders upon release from TDCJ on parole. At some point between 1999 and 2005 those convicted of violent crimes and 3g offenses became candidates for SISP. Effective September 1st, 2009 that was further expanded to anyone who is a confirmed member of:

d. Is a member of an organized prison gang including:
(1) Mexican Mafia (EME), AKA Mexikanemi (EMI),
(2) Texas Syndicate,
(3) Barrio Azteca,
(4) Aryan Brotherhood of Texas,
(5) Aryan Circle,
(6) Hermanos de Latino Pistoleros,
(7) Raza Unida,
(8) Texas Mafia,
(9) Crips,
(10) Bloods,
(11) Texas Chicano Brotherhood,
(12) Partido Revolucion Mexicano,
(13) Any other organized prison gang identified by CID as a security threat group;
SISP Origins
It’s been said that the initial idea of tracking individuals by way of radio frequency was 1st born in a comic book series based on Spiderman. When I actually read that I thought to myself “say what??!!”, but stranger things have happened. Around 1984 Judge Jack Love of New Mexico was the first person to use radio frequencies combined with telephone land lines to monitor people on probation and parole. Here in Texas that technology is referred to as electronic monitoring in parole lingo and has been in wide use for a number of years. Most electronic monitoring programs where parole is concerned are usually 2-3 months upon release. Some may be as long as 6 months. Intensive Supervision and some Maximum Supervision parolees are the one’s to be found who wear that type of ankle monitor that usually provides a 7am-7pm window to go by during the day. Their movements can be tracked by a field officer who drives by the scheduled site someone is supposed to be at and shoots a signal or beam with a type of tracking device that interacts with the ankle monitor worn and determines whether or not the parolee is actually where they’re scheduled to be.
When Texas created SISP in 1997, the use of global positioning satellite (GPS) systems was put in place. This allows the whereabouts of someone to be tracked by satellite with the type of monitor I spoke of earlier. When you return home for the day and place the monitor back in the base unit connected to the phone line that’s been approved through parole, the info is uploaded through the phone line to the command center in Austin revealing where someone has been since they left their residence. While at home the ankle bracelet I wear keeps track of me and interacts with the passive GPS unit connected to the phone line.
Since then, technological advances have now come up with active GPS systems that enable the use of wireless transmissions and are also in use among some who are on SISP. They are not as common and are more expensive to the state for usage and upkeep. Passive GPS systems cost around $5.00 per day while Active GPS systems are somewhere around $10.00 per day.
Pro Tech is the Odessa, Florida based provider of the GPS systems and tracking devices used within SISP here in Texas. They have a catalog of what the monitors look like and the different types. Those of us on SISP pay $18.00 in parole fees like everyone else on parole. There are no extra fees to be paid with the exception of a monthly phone bill for the land line required for installation of a passive GPS system at one’s residence. The land line must be bare with no custom calling or added features.

Scheduling and What is Permissible
Those of us who are on SISP have to report once a week or once every 2 weeks until we are approved for a lower level of supervision by the SISP panel in Austin composed of 3 parole board members or discharge our sentence on parole or go back to prison for a parole violation or new conviction. You request the addresses or places you need to go to for a 7 day period when you report each week and a schedule is set up that provides time to get to your destination, time for the actual activity itself (work, church, doctor, grocery store shopping, etc.) and time to get back home. The SISP officer assigned to you documents the schedule in the computer and makes 2 copies of the schedule. One is given to the parolee and the SISP officer keeps the other one. Under SISP there are only 7 authorized activities permitted you in terms of movement or where you can go:

1. Seek Employment: Monday thru Friday and offenders are to provide location information.

2. Maintain Employment: With US approval for Non-Sex Offenders only the “Motion No GPS” alert may be temporarily disabled for offenders that work in an environment that requires offender to be in motion without the ability of gaining GPS.
NOTE: The Motion no GPS alarm shall only be disabled for time the offender scheduled to be at work.

3. Approved Counseling or Education Programs.

4. Religious Services: Sex Offenders can not attend until a high risk plan is coordinated with sex offender therapist.

5. Daily Living Needs: Do not include recreational or entertainment activities. Activities related to housework (e.g. cutting yard, painting the house) shall be staffed with US for approval. A US may approve activities related to life changing events (e.g. funeral, birth of their child).

6. Medical, Dental, Legal Appointments or to respond to Medical Emergencies:
Offenders that are the primary caretaker for individual residing to the same household may be granted time to attend appointments. In case of emergency where offender stay is overnight, SISP officer shall notify Hospital Security to advise what type of supervision offender is under.

7. District Parole Officer Appointments.
Some times you can have an adjustment made to your weekly schedule after it has been submitted for the week, but that is only sometimes. SISP parole officers have a more intense schedule to keep up with than most other parole officers. They are on call 24/7. Subsequently, they spend a lot of time actually looking in on people away from the parole office. All home visits on SISP are random and done once a week.


Dear Firebrand, Oct. 26, 2013
I am on SISP and have about 4 more month's before I come up for my yearly review. I want to know if you could answer a question for me regarding SISP. I have a job offer that requires moving around, and my parole officer always tells me I have to find a job that is stationary. I have looked every where and never get hired. I have a chance to get a good job and make a career of it, but I feel like I am being hindered by my parole officer. I'm not a S/O and just happened to make bad choices while in prison. Can parolee's get work that requires movement here in the state of Texas?
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Old 10-26-2013, 01:41 PM
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Such jobs can be had but you have to be able to provide a stringent schedule of where you will be throughout the day. Officers hate such schedules because it is a lot more effort to key them into the computer and, admittedly, also afford a far greater likelihood of the releasee screwing up the schedule and a warrant issuing due to the monitor violation.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:24 AM
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Does anyone know the statistics on how many parolees on the SISP complete parole successfully?
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:49 AM
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Does anyone know the statistics on how many parolees on the SISP complete parole successfully?
I don't have numbers, but I know that there is a greater percentage of SISP releasees who will have at least one warrant during their time on supervision than will regular releasees.

The reality is that, from the inception of the program effective September 01, 1997, the position of the Board and the agency has been "these are the people we do not want on the streets." It has loosely been revised to include those who the agency wants to be able to point to and tell the Legislature that "hey, we tried, but they just aren't doing well in the community" (ie. certain violent offenders who had done more than 20 years or who had heinous sex offenses).

In the beginning, SISP had been a response to those persons who were released to old-law mandatory supervision that would never have had a chance in hell at parole otherwise. Remember that prior to 1987, EVERY numeric sentence (ie. anything that was not LIFE or DEATH) had an absolute date where time credits would mandate a release to mandatory supervision.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:48 AM
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In terms of how long it takes one to come off of SISP,an average of 1-3 years if you stay in compliance with your stipulations remain focused. Non SO parolees often times see that happen the fastest and depending on the nature of ones offense. For SOs,it may or maynot be more complicated than that. Just depends on what you did to be placed on SISP to begin with. Many will be done with it in a year or two and a few will have to deal with it for some years to come.
What SISP was intended for in the beginning and what it has gone on to become are not entirely the same thing anymore. In the beginning,the majority of those on SISP were SOs,now some 16years later often times you see more non SOs on SISP across the state than you do SOs and thats not an opinion,that's according to someone with parole. The SISP law that began in 1997is much like a number of laws that been passed pertaining to prison & parole since the George Bush political philosophy became the norm down in Austin. The retributionists as opposed to the reformists will pass a law with the idea of getting their foot in the door on a given issue only to look up several years later and it have become something more than that or unrealistically absurd.
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:42 PM
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In terms of how long it takes one to come off of SISP,an average of 1-3 years if you stay in compliance with your stipulations remain focused.
That means NO violations...no monitor violations of ANY type, no dirty UA's, completely current on fees and fines and restitution.

Quote:
What SISP was intended for in the beginning and what it has gone on to become are not entirely the same thing anymore. In the beginning,the majority of those on SISP were SOs,
That is actually incorrect. Most in the beginning were Aggravated offenses, to include Murder and other offenses with Deadly Weapon provisions.

SISP was a legislative response to the State of Florida having been slapped down by the SCotUS when they tried to retroactively do away with their equivalent to mandatory supervision. As an outcropping of that, we got both SISP as well as discretionary-mandatory-supervision. SISP was designed to stringently supervise those persons who would never have been released except by discharge of sentence but for the pre-September 1987 provisions of law where EVERYONE with a numeric sentence was eligible for mandatory supervision, no matter HOW heinous the offense.

I was on the committee that wrote some of the original guidelines and the files for SISP releases lived outside of my office in the very beginning. From an issuance standpoint, the agency took the zero-tolerance stance to heart- the very first guy released on SISP was the subject of a warrant barely two hours after release because they stopped on the way home for a burger.

Quote:
The SISP law that began in 1997is much like a number of laws that been passed pertaining to prison & parole since the George Bush political philosophy became the norm down in Austin. The retributionists as opposed to the reformists will pass a law with the idea of getting their foot in the door on a given issue only to look up several years later and it have become something more than that or unrealistically absurd.
SISP as a broad concept was not defined in law. Rather the Legislature had directed the agency to come up with something more stringent than Condition L- Highest Level of Supervision. AND they provided funding. The agency then was tasked with the specifics of the program. I still keep many of my original notes from those August 1997 meetings because they occasionally are of use when I get hired as an expert witness in some of the cases where supervision is an issue before the Court.
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Old 11-09-2013, 11:05 AM
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Wow...I have to be honest and say I'm a bit stunned by what you've stated here in this last post,CenTexLyn. To the best of my knowledge in the four years that I have been on SISP,,you are the first person to come forward and shed some light on how SISP came into existence during the beginning stages. Much of what I've posted has been based on conversations with SISP parole division members here in the Dallas area and what I could dig up online. Specifically in regard to the wording of the 1997SISP law that came to be, at some point it stated that SISP was to be applied for only certain SOs and of that I am certain. Still,if infact you were there and part of the evil empire's stringent efforts to write/impose an even more severe SISP law into existence with the blessings of your peers/legislators then,who am I to doubt that? It's obvious that you are more than knowledgeable about this.
Still...what the initial idea of what SISP was to be and what is now are not entirely the same thing which in turn gets back to the statement I made that once a law has been passed pertaining to parole issues,it's not uncommon to see changes/modifications and misinterpretations of a given law come into play.
The most effective means of countering those laws that are carried out or enforced in an unconstitutional/uncivil manner is by filling what is as a class action lawsuit which being that you're an attorney of some type should be more than familiar with. A number of them have been filed over the years and some of which have been done so in vain. Where SISP lawsuits are concerned,many have not seen the positive changes hoped for. Civil law and parole law are clearly kept separate/apart in the courts,but that is another issue and story.
Yes, SISP is infact a broad concept that goes far beyond the law and we elect people to pass those laws. It's a scary thought to consider that any agency has the power to write/create law as opposed to upholding/adhering to it. Some people simply have too much power when the truth is they should not have it at all. The scary part is when the power they have blinds them in such a way that they become less than human with regard to the authority they have over others. And I got news for you,there's a lot blindness in this law and among the people that brought it about.
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Old 11-09-2013, 11:13 AM
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Remember that field staff have no say in who gets placed on ANY of the specialized caseloads that are voted prior to release (and SISP is ONLY utilized prior to the release from TDCJ) and often has no clue about operational issues on Shoal Creek for either the Parole Division OR the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

If any of the ones you spoke to were around in those August 1997 meetings where Victor Rodriguez spoke, then they know what the program was designed to do...

Oh...and through depositions across the past several years, it is also clear that the field staff still are at odds with both the Central Office AND the Board (not to mention that the Central Office and the Board are rarely on the same page). Suffice it to say, there have been several instances where the AG's office has learned from the Division that they were not happy at the way I have poked holes in some of their claims
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