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Federal Prison Info & Self Surrendering Information about Federal Prisons and Self-Surrendering to the BOP.

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  #1  
Old 03-01-2004, 05:55 PM
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kintml2u kintml2u is offline
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Default FMC Devens

Institution
FMC Devens


Inmate Mailing Address
FMC-Devens



Note
By the way, Devens is an FMC but I was inside for a while and it is a straight up prison NOT a prison hospital like Carswell. It is merely called an FMC to keep the Town of Ayer quiet. There was no difference between the FMC and any other prison I was in. I spent a majority of my time in the camp with 28 days in the SHU.

Educational Programs
There are few educational programs. Of course there is the mandatory GED program. Inmates without the GED must “work towards” attainment of their GED or lose their good time. A fairly effective program that in essence is run by volunteer inmates or those working in the Education Department. There are mandatory “pre-release” programs which re largely a waste of time. Some educated inmates like myself organized developed and taught 8 weeks seminars in different areas. I taught “Business Law” which was comprised of basic contract, employment, labor and tax law. I also taught a course in Civil Rights with a heavy dose of criminal law (which was prohibited by the Unit Team). Another inmate with a background in finance taught a course designed to assist inmates in understanding loans, debt, small business financing, investment vehicles, and the like. These courses were for credit (a certificate and pre-release credit) and were approved by the Unit Team and the BOP education department. Other than the above, there was little opportunity for education. In other words, unless the inmates took in upon themselves to teach others, it did not get done. There were no college level/credit courses available.


Work Details
Work was divided in the following categories: 1. Landscaping 2. Education, 3. Kitchen, 4 Housekeeping; 5: Warehouse, 6. Recreation. Landscaping involved just that: cutting grass, fertilizing, brush clean up and minor construction jobs. Snow removal was also part of our lob and was a 24 hour job. I was on landscaping detail and volunteered for snow duty so I can get out of the unit more often. It involved night work, cold conditions etc. Landscaping was a sought after job in the spring and summer for obvious reasons. Education: These guys sat in the library all day and occasionally tutored other inmates in the GED program and rearranged the small number of books. Some took it very seriously, others did not. Kitchen: pretty standard cooking and cleaning chores, but it always seemed the the kitchen cop was an asshole. Lot of guys went from the kitchen to the hole as they usually had sticky fingers and the temptation was too much. Split shifts broke up the day for most of the guys. Housekeeping: sweeping, mopping, cleaning. waxing. When done. Start again. Good job for the loner and and the guys who didn’t want to be outside. Warehouse: FMC Devens is situated near an industrial park where the prison rents warehouse space for its food and dry goods. About 20 guys worked there pulling and sorting stuff for the Camp and FMC. They were driven there in a prison bus. Typical warehouse work: heavy lifting and menial tasks. Recreation: I always wondered what these guys did. I never saw anything like work, but they hung around the rec trailer and played gin. By the way I owe one of them slightly less than 1 million pushups as he was a hellava gin player.
Work in these facilities is a privilege as the real punishment of prison is the abject boredom. None of the work was challenging and you could typically work as hard as you wanted or as easy as needed to get by.
The FMC does not have an outside work cadre and all inmates inside the FMC work at all times in side the facility doing pretty much the same except landscaping and warehouse work which was done by the “campers.”

Recreational Activities
Softball. Very big in the Spring and Summer. Organized by the inmates and run well. Fair teams, no fights (that I saw) and a real tension breaker. Basketball in the outdoor courts was also big. The Camp also had a walking track as does the FMC. Theirs was surrounded by razor wire; the camps was not. The facility had a recreational trailer and recreational room with only aerobic equipment and medicine balls. This is not to say the some inmates did not devise makeshift weights and barbells, etc. but they were considered contraband. Once a month there was a Prison sponsored Bingo game where the winners received Gatorade and snacks. Most of the passive recreation consisted or cards, gin or hearts, and chess.

Medical
Terrible. There was one MD for the entire prison and many PA’s. Most of the PA’s really had no idea of what was going on and more often than not inmates went to other inmates with MD’s who were there for Medicare Fraud. The PA’s were in fact dangerous as they tried to diagnose all illness without the need for any tests and they lacked the training. Medical treatment is better in several of the 3rd world countries that I have been in. The general public would be shocked if they knew the kind of medical treatment inmates received. I could give you over 12 stories of outright malpractice and indifference which almost killed an inmate.


Visitation
Visitors need to be on the “list” which means prior approval. No record, etc. for approval. Visitors could bring in nothing other than 1 pack of sealed cigarettes and a book of matches, along with their car keys. Visits were from 2:00 pm to 8:00 pm on Friday and 8:00 am to 3:00 pm Saturdays Sundays and Holidays. No touching except for a light kiss on the cheek upon coming and going. I believed that the BOP strongly encouraged visits and really did not give people a hard time, but that also depended on the desk cop, who could sometimes be an a**hole. In the camp there was no limit on visits or a point system. In the FMC there was a monthly 20 point system with an encouragement for weekday visits on Thursday and Friday. It seemed that it was more of a crowd control issue rather than a security issue. Too many people want to visit all day iont he weekends and the visiting room could not accommodate the people.
SHU- provided your punishement for seg did not involve a denial of visitation. It was allowed in 2 hour blocks one day a week.



Food Services
For a prison, Devens food was excellent as compared to County and Brooklyn or the Wyatt Detention Center I was in. They are big on carbs:rice in particular and pasta. Meat quality was poor and it all carried a rating of “Fit for Human Consumption” rather than a USDA grade. They skimped on amounts but there was always a salad bar. You must eat out of your locker to maintain weight. There was a decent amount of black market food available for the purchase. Hey, its prison and not the Palm.

Commissary
Food stuffs: candy noodles, soups coffee, tea, chocolate etc. Clothes: sneakers, sweats, socks and the like: Toiletries: Soap, shampoo, razors toothbrush/paste and the like. Watches, nightlights for reading and batteries for lighting cigarettes when they took our matches away. If you like I can send along the commissary order list that I liberated upon by release.

Library
As a lawyer, it was possible to do rudimentary legal research. As a lay person, effective legal research is impossible. They did not provide any digesting system tools and only the Federal Reporters p until 3 years earlier. As a result, it was impossible to know about recent cases. Without a digesting system like West’s it is impossible to perform any meaningful research. No doubt that the law library was kept sparce for a reason. The leisure library was Ok but primarily was shelved with books donated by inmates who had them sent in or left there upon release.


RDAP
It is available.. Waiting list is one year to 18 months. I don’t recall the requirements as I was never in it or eligible and frankly would not have been in long enough to complete it.

Living Conditions
In the camp, it is bunk style with 124 of us in one room in cubicles. 2 to a cube. Cubes were 8 X 10 with a bunk bed and steel lockers. Not much else. Cold in winter; hot in summer. Clean and vermin free except for the occasional field mice. A recreational room which doubled as a visitors room. A chow hall, which doubled as a tv room in the evenings. We also had cable TV with HBO, showtime and the premium channels. A total of three tv’s in different parts of the rec room. A small library about 900 square feet with chairs and desks for about 10 people. Stall showers and an adequate number of urinals and toilets. Freshly painted and always clean facility. The Unit Team were pretty lazy and the only time things got tough was when Region was coming for an inspection and they would do a lot of shakedowns and run a tighter ship, Most of the CO’s were “wannabe cops and tough guys” who were itching to get into a beef with an inmate. The same guys who would wet their pants on the outside, however. I don’t believe they are well trained or well screened and trouble with vindictive guards was common. After I left, I read in the paper that one of the female guards was indicted for having sex with an inmate and bringing in contraband (phones) in return.


Racial/Age make up
Pretty close to even among the three major racial groups: White, Black and Hispanic. We ran the gamut in ages from 17 to 79 years old. Predictably, most drug offenders were in their 20’s and most white-collar guys in their 40’s and 50’s. A strong majority were in their 20’s however.

Typewriters
There was one. Yes ONE and you had to buy your own ribbon and correction tape at a cost of $25.00. They had 15 brand new computers in another room set up and working but they were only for show. Inmates were not allowed to use them and they were shown to judges and inspection people when they came through

[b] Telephones [b]
5 in the camp

Furloughs
Yes and apparently quite frequently. Medical furloughs when you had your own insurance seemed to be the most popular and of course furlough transfers were common. Weekend furloughs were available providing a guy was two years short and had a clean record. They were limited by reg to 2 but only one was the norm.. I would guess that about 40% of the guys were eligible

Items issued by BOP
4 sets of used underwear; 4 sets of socks 4 pair of pants and 4 shorts. 2 sets of thermal underwear one winter jacket and one spring jacket; cotton work gloves which doubled as winter gloves and one pair of military issue shoes. The shoes were garbage and our feet were always wet. They must have been made from a herd of cows that leaked and drowned as NO leather could leak this bad. You could buy a scarf and wool blend socks in the commissary.

Items that can be sent in
Soft cover books by mail. Hardcover had to be sent directly from the publisher. Nothing else could be mailed in. One pack of sealed cigarettes on a visiting day could be brought in but it was always cheaper to buy them from the commissary at $2.10 pack then have someone spend $5.00 at the store.

Parole Hearings


Religious Groups
Yes. Muslim, Jewish and Catholic were the predominant noticeable religions. There was no animosity along religious lines and we all shared the same chapel. Some of the Muslims seemed a bit more radical, but I usually enjoyed the debate and the emotion in which many spoke. There was one “religion” run by a guy named Reverend June who really ran more of a ministry. He asked inmates for donations of clothes, sneakers, sweats upon release and he gave it out to newbie’s or others that couldn’t afford to buy stuff from the commissary. Donations of other stuff were gladly accepted and although the Rev. had MUCH more stuff in his cell than permitted, the CO’s didn’t bother him about the apparent “contraband.” It was a take as you need, pay if you can type deal. I never really found out the religion Rev. June practiced but it was from the heart as he was a straight up, caring individual that always tried to help others without preaching or asking for anything in return.

Parenting Programs
No

Marriage Workshops
No


{JBW}

Last edited by kintml2u; 03-31-2004 at 03:32 AM..
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  #2  
Old 03-30-2004, 10:43 AM
pasco323 pasco323 is offline
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I ahve a question.Does it take long to get into the camp?If my lawyer put down devens what is the chance of getting a place close to home like 30miles for me..Thanks Pas

Last edited by kintml2u; 04-10-2004 at 07:29 PM..
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Old 03-30-2004, 06:14 PM
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John B. Webster John B. Webster is offline
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Your ability to get into any camp depends on your sentence, background, crime and the like. They use a matrix and formula with a numerical calculation and score. If the judge makes a recommendation for a camp, it helps but is not definitive.
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Old 03-30-2004, 06:29 PM
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John, what was the population there?
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Old 04-07-2004, 07:35 AM
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Default FMC Devens now = FTC..........

Just a note - FMC Devens now is FTC (federal treatment center) due to no accreditation........

The Color of Justice is GREEN !

Coral

Last edited by kintml2u; 04-10-2004 at 07:28 PM..
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Old 04-10-2004, 07:06 PM
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124 and not a spare bunk
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Old 06-11-2007, 02:58 PM
BrookinsTwo BrookinsTwo is offline
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Default Fmc Devens Mrsa Infection Widely Spreading/deadly (plese Read!)

I AM NOT SURE HOW TO POST A NEW MESSAGE SO I DID A REPLY TO THE FMC DEVENS, MASS (FEDERAL MEDICAL PRISON) FORUM.

JUST WANTED TO LET EVERYONE KNOW THAT HAS A LOVED ONE IN DEVENS FEDERAL MEDICAL FACILITY THAT THE MSRA DISEASE IS SPREADING RAPIDLY THERE. MY FATHERS HAS IT ON BOTH LEGS AND ARMS. HE TELLS ME SO MANY OTHERS HAVE IT AS WELL. IF THE INMATES COMPLAIN TOO MUCH THEY GET PUNISHED. MY FATHER TOLD ME THIS IN SO MANY WORDS. IN THE BEGINNING WHEN WE FIRST FOUND OUT SEVERAL MONTHS AGO ABOUT IT HE ONLY COULD TALK BRIEFLY ABOUT IT. I DONT UNDERSTAND WHY INMATES CANT SPEAK OUT ABOUT WHAT IS HAPPENING TO THEM.

LAWSUITS ARE IN PENNSYLVANIA STATE ABOUT THIS MSRA DISEASE AND IMMATES HAVE WON IN SOME CASES BECAUSE OF THE LACK OF CARE THE PRISONS ARE GIVING THEM DUE TO THIS DISEASE.

MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, rare drug-resistant germ now appears to cause more than half of all skin infections treated in U.S. emergency rooms, Prisons, Nursing Homes, etc., say researchers who documented the superbug's startling spread in the general population.

YOU CAN LOOK THIS UP ON THE INTERNET FOR MORE INFORMATION. THERE IS TONS OF INFORMATION ON IT.

THIS STAPH INFECTION IS VERY DEADLY IF NOT TREATED CORRECTLY. MY FATHER WAS TOLD HE WOULD HAVE TO HAVE HIS LEGS AMPUTATED NOW THEY TELL HIM THERE IS NOTHING THEY CAN DO BECAUSE OF HE IS A DIABETIC. THE WOUNDS HAVE BEEN THERE FOR QUITE SOME TIME BECAUSE OF THE LACK OF CARE IN THE BEGINNING. I FEEL THE INFECTION HAS TAKEN A TOLE ON MY FATHERS HEALTH MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY. ITS A SAD SITUATION WHEN YOU CANT DO ANYTHING ABOUT IT. I AM 1900 MILES AWAY SO I CANT SEE HIM ONLY WHAT HE TELLS ME ON THE PHONE.

I WOULD LIKE TO TALK WITH OTHERS THAT HAVE LOVE ONES IN THIS PRISON WHO ALSO HAS CONTRACTED THIS INFECTION OR WHO HAS A LOVE ONE WHO IS A DIABETIC IN FMC ON DIALYSIS.

THIS FEDERAL MEDICAL FACILITY IS NOTHING LIKE A HOSPITAL.
MY FATHER HAD A HEART ATTACK THREE MONTHS AFTER HE FIRST WENT IN AND NO ONE CONTACTED ANY OF THE FAMILY BY PHONE/LETTER. MY FATHER CALLED ME AFTER A WEEK HAD GONE BY TO TELL ME HE HAD JSUT GOTTEN OUT OF THE HOSPITAL. I ASKED HIM WHY HE DID NOT CALL AND HE TOLD ME THEY WOULD NOT LET HIM.

MY FATHER IS IN A WHEEL CHAIR NOW BECAUSE OF THE MSRA AND HAVE TO PAY INMATES TO WHEEL HIM AROUND BECAUSE HE HAS NO FEELINGS IN HIS HANDS TO ROLL HIMSELF AROUND. IS THIS CRAZY OR WHAT? WE HAVE TO SEND MONEY TO HIM ALL THE TIME. MONEY WE DONT HAVE. THE OTHER INMATES TAKES ADVANTAGE OF ELDERLY AND DISABLE LIKE MY FATHER AND THERE IS NOTHING YOU CAN DO. IF YOU COMPLAIN THEN THE INMATES WOULD RETALIATE AGAINST MY FATHER. HAS ANY ONE EVER HEARD OF THIS???

ALSO I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW TO CREATE A NEW THREAD SO I CAN POST THIS CORRECTLY, PLEASE!

IF I CAN BE OF ANY HELP TO OTHERS PLEASE LET ME KNOW.

THANK YOU!
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Old 06-20-2007, 10:53 PM
julzyp1 julzyp1 is offline
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oh my gosh! my boyfriend is being sent there anytime soon! isnt there anybody that can contact the health department of this problem, i know there is not alot you can do to avoid this mrsa, but this is a big law suite to this prison if they dont do something about it now! can you give me any information of health departments that i can contact in that area?
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Old 06-20-2007, 11:06 PM
julzyp1 julzyp1 is offline
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the last info about fmc deven was written 2004 does anybody have any new information or rules that have been changed since than PLEASE! can anyone help me with answers?
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Old 09-15-2008, 11:03 PM
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Default FMC Devens Updated Info 2007/08

Note: I cut and pasted alot from the previous post on life at Devens, but updated quite a few things so it is more up to date. So take the time to read through it as it is not the same as posted, but contains alot of the same but updated info.


Institution
FMC Devens


Inmate Mailing Address
Inmate name and number
FMC Devens
P.O. Box 879
Ayer, MA 01432
(you can put the housing unit on the envelope too but people get moved so in my opinion it's better not to)



Note
I agree, Devens is an FMC but I was inside for a while and it is a straight up prison NOT a prison hospital like people are led to believe. It is merely called an FMC. There was no difference between the FMC and any other prison I was in. I spent the majority of my time in H-1 and H-2 units with a 14 day stay in the SHU. During my time there the sex offender program at Butner was closed down and many of them were shipped to Devens. This made the residents of Ayers hair stand on end. There were plenty of articles in the papers, etc believe me. They were in the process of trying to move the SO's to a single unit both upstairs and down to keep them pretty much in one area just before I left. I myself was sent there do to severe liver damage from my prior job, not drugs or alcohol. So because of my condition I was designated to Devens as it was the closest FMC.

Educational Programs
There are few educational programs. Of course there is the mandatory GED program. Inmates without the GED must “work towards” attainment of their GED or lose their good time. A fairly effective program that in essence is run by inmates or inmates working in the Education Department. There are mandatory “pre-release” programs which are largely a waste of time. There are some educated inmates that teach some 8 weeks seminars in different areas. Like a very basic legal research class, Discovery channel type video classes and some music theory and guitar and other instrument classes. I also took a computer class in Microsoft Office 2000 which while out of date is actually quite similiar to what's out there today. There are also Graphic and advanced Graphic computer classes. Space is limited so you get into those classes based on your release date. Another inmate with a background in finance taught a course designed to assist inmates in understanding budgeting, loans, debt, small business financing, investment vehicles, and the like. These courses were for credit (a certificate and pre-release credit) and were approved by the Unit Team and the BOP education department. Other than the above, there was little opportunity for education. In other words, unless the inmates took in upon themselves to teach others, it did not get done. There were no college level/credit courses available.


Work Details
Work was divided in the following categories: 1. Compound (Summer landscaping and basically picking up paper and of course polishing the brass drains on hand and knees. and Winter, picking up papers and leaves as well as shoveling snow at all hours and trust me there is alot of snow up there.) 2. Education, 3. Kitchen, 4 Housekeeping; 5: Warehouse, 6. Recreation. 7. Being an inmate companion which is basically pushing wheel chairs and making sure that patients who can not take care of themselves are shaved, showered, etc. And yes if they soil themselves, you do pick it up. There is also a ward in the basment of one of the buildings called long term care. If you wind up there, most likely you aren't coming out as that is where the sickest inmates go. Education: These guys actually do tutor other inmates in the GED program and the library aides rearranged the small number of books. Some took it very seriously, others did not. Kitchen: pretty standard cooking and cleaning chores, Most of the C.O.'s were pretty cool while I was there (I worked Kitchen) There were some hard noses but for the most part if you did what they told you too They tended to let you get a little extra chow and sometimes even made special meals, mostly leftovers, but if you knew you were having a real bad meal and they gave you leftovers, believe me it was a good thing. Sometimes if there was extra things to do or an inspection coming up and you busted your hump to make things shine you got some fresh fruit or something for doing it and fresh fruit is definately a good thing in there. Some of the guys went from the kitchen to the hole as they had sticky fingers and the temptation was too much. There were other reasons too. I was working the line one day and a guy didn't have his ID on a night they were scanning ID's and he went off on the C.O. Instead of going about things in a more civil way. My personal opinion and remember, I was an inmate, is that the guy instead of saying look I left my ID at my unit (which you are supposed to have your ID on you pretty much at all times) The guy started yelling and screaming at the C.O. frankly he deserved to get hauled off. Split shifts break up the day for most of the guys and you can go to classes the library, etc.. Housekeeping: sweeping, mopping, cleaning. waxing. When done. Start again. Good job for the guys who didn’t want to be outside. Warehouse: FMC Devens is situated near an industrial park where the prison rents warehouse space for its food and dry goods. About 20 guys worked there pulling and sorting stuff for the Camp and FMC. They were driven there in a prison bus. Typical warehouse work: heavy lifting and menial tasks. The Guys at the camp loaded the trucks and the guys who work warehouse at the actual FMC do not go outside the gates but put the food and goods for commisary, etc into their holding areas. Recreation: These guys would tend the baseball field and football setups for flag football,and soccer, draw the lines, rake and pick up the field area as well as sweep and mop the rec building and wash the team uniforms
Work in these facilities is a privilege as the real punishment of prison is the abject boredom. None of the work was challenging and you could typically work as hard as you wanted or as easy as needed to get by.
The FMC does not have an outside work cadre and all inmates inside the FMC work at all times in side the facility doing pretty much the same except landscaping and warehouse work which was done by the “campers.”

Recreational Activities
Softball. Very big in the Spring and Summer. Organized by the inmates and run well. Fair teams, no fights (the occasional injury while playing) and a real tension breaker. Basketball in the outdoor courts was also big. There is an inside basketball/soccer building too. FMC Devens has a track for both jogging and walking it is surrounded by razor wire; and plenty of sensors and the perimeter is heavily patroled by armed C.O.'s The camp is not. The FMC has a recreational building with only aerobic equipment and medicine balls. This is not to say the some inmates did not devise makeshift weights and barbells, etc. but they were considered contraband. Once in awhile mostly at holiday time there was a Prison sponsored Bingo game where the winners received Gatorade and snacks. Most of the passive recreation consisted or cards, gin or hearts, and chess.

Medical
Terrible. There were two MD's (and one hardly saw any patients) for the entire prison and many PA’s. Most of the PA's seem to know what they are doing now. But some guys seek out other inmates with MD’s who were there for Medicare Fraud. Medical treatment is definately better on the outside but hey this is prison. However the general public would be alarmed if they saw the kind of medical treatment inmates actually receive.

Visitation
Visitors need to be on the “list” which means prior approval. No record, etc. for approval. Visitors can bring in nothing other than change for the vending machines. Visits at the FMC are from 8:00am to 3:00 pm on Thursday - Sunday and Holidays. If the inmates unit scores higher than a 95% on inspection day those in that unit get an extra day which is Monday. No touching except for a light kiss upon coming and going. I believed that the BOP strongly encouraged visits and really did not give people a hard time, but that also depended on the desk cop, who could sometimes be an a**hole. In the FMC there was a monthly 20 point system with an encouragement for weekday visits on Thursday and Friday. It seemed that it was more of a crowd control issue rather than a security issue. Too many people want to visit all day on the weekends and the visiting room could not accommodate the people.
SHU- provided your punishement for seg did not involve a denial of visitation. It was allowed in 2 hour blocks one day a week.



Food Services
For a prison, Devens food was pretty good as compared to the Wyatt Detention Center I was in. They are big on carbs:rice in particular and pasta. Meat quality was poor and it all carried a rating of “Fit for Human Consumption” rather than a USDA grade. They skimped on amounts but there was always a salad bar. They were switching to a national menu when I left and instead of a full breakfast Mon-Fri you got a "continential" Breakfast. On Sat and Sun you got breakfast for breakfast and another breakfast for "brunch" Sometimes it's better to just eat out of your locker if it's a bad meal or if it's wintertime as you walk outside from your unit to the chow hall through almost any type of weather. There was a decent amount of black market food available for the purchase. Face it, it's Jaile not Yale.

Commissary
Food stuffs: candy, noodles, soups, coffee, tea, chocolate etc. Clothes: sneakers, sweats, socks and the like: Toiletries: Soap, shampoo, razors toothbrush/paste and the like. Watches, nightlights for reading and batteries for for your radio or reading light. The limit per month you could spend was $290.00.

Library
The "Law" library" if you are/were a lawyer, it was possible to do rudimentary legal research. As a lay person, effective legal research is impossible. They did not provide any digesting system tools and only the Federal Reporters p until 3 years earlier. As a result, it was impossible to know about recent cases. Without a digesting system like West’s it is impossible to perform any meaningful research. No doubt that the law library was kept sparce for a reason. The leisure library was Ok but primarily was shelved with books donated by inmates who had them sent in or left there upon release. There are Typewriters in the law library for legal use only and you must purchase your own ribbon and correction ribbon from the commissary and reserve a typewriter prior to using one. There are also TV's with built in VCR's and they were converting to DVD's when I left so you could watch videos to pass some time. These TV's also had to be reserved for a specific time and if you weren't there, the TV would be given to an inmate on the waiting list.


Drug Counseling/Alcohol Counseling
There is counseling available via A.A. meetings and N.A. mettings twice a week.

Living Conditions
In the FMC, it is a bunk style dorm (Cube) or cells depending on what unit you are in. with 2 to a cube. Cubes were 8 X 10 with a bunk bed and steel lockers. Not much else. Hot in winter; freezing from like march on thru the summer. Clean and vermin free except for the occasional field mice. A recreational room with a few workout machines."Main Line" which is the chow hall, which you walked to in order to eat and a tv room in the unit. We also had cable TV and on saturday and sundays they showed movies usually from the stock at the library. A total of 4 tv’s were in different parts of the rec room one for sports, one on the spanish staion and two for other shows. Stall showers and an adequate number of urinals and toilets. Freshly painted and always clean facility. The Unit Team were kind of lax and things really got done when Region was coming for an inspection and they would do a lot of shakedowns and run a tighter ship, Most of the CO’s were not that bad except for an occasional idiot. I don’t believe they are well trained or well screened

Racial/Age make up
Pretty close to even among the three major racial groups: White, Black and Hispanic. We ran the gamut in ages from 20 to 79 years old. Predictably, most drug offenders were in their 30’s and most white-collar guys in their 40’s and 50’s. A strong majority were in their 30’s and 40's however. I met guys who were locked up for years with years to go and had such a great outlook it was amazing, there are people there doing lots of years, some even life. I actually met the drug runner they made the movie "Blow" about. He was a great guy, when I felt like crap, he always made me feel better. I saw people in ther who were in their late 50's and not getting out till 2020. The make up is very diverse to say the least.


Telephones
Usually 6 to a unit. You could not use the phone during certain hours unless you worked during the hours the phones were available for everyone. You also could not use the phone during count times.

Furloughs
During my time there, except for an inmate going home for home confinement or to a halfway house. I never saw anyone go out on furlough. There were "furloughs" available for funerals of immeadiate family or deathly ill relatives but you were shackled and transported by at least 2 officers and you or your family paid up front for the trip, the CO's, Mileage, food, etc. and the furlough needed to be approved by the warden. Needless to say I didn't see many go out that way either.
Items issued by BOP
4 sets of used boxers; 4 sets of socks 4 pair of pants and 4 shirts. 2 sets of thermal underwear one winter jacket; cotton work gloves which doubled as winter gloves and one pair of military issue shoes. The shoes were garbage and our feet were always wet. They must have been made from a herd of cows that leaked and drowned as NO leather could leak this bad. You could buy a scarf and wool blend socks in the commissary.

Items that can be sent in
Soft cover books by mail. Hardcover had to be sent directly from the publisher. Nothing else could be mailed in. Newspapers could also be sent via mail from the publisher.

Parole Hearings
None that I saw

Religious Groups
Yes. Muslim, Jewish, Protestant, and Catholic were the predominant noticeable religions. There was no animosity along religious lines and we all shared the same chapel. There was one guy who's name I forgot who really ran more of a ministry. He asked inmates for donations of clothes, sneakers, sweats upon release as well as deoderant, shampoo, soap and toothpaste and he gave it out to newbie’s or others that couldn’t afford to buy stuff from the commissary. Donations of other stuff were gladly accepted and although he had MUCH more stuff in his cell than permitted, the CO’s didn’t bother him about the apparent “contraband.” It was a take as you need, donate if you can type deal. I will agree that it was from the heart as he was a straight up, caring individual that always tried to help others without preaching or asking for anything in return.

Parenting Programs
There was a video program called Read to your child or something similiar run by an outside group called the Jerhico Project.

Marriage Workshops
No

Health Awareness
I can honestly say when the time came flu shots were readily available, and if there was an issue such as a MRSA or scabies issue, etc. Medical staff did make seminars available and posted warnings, etc and precaustions on contracting various diseases. So in that respect they were really helpful.

Other Programs
One of the Psych. Dr's actually ran several good groups for interested people. These were outside people who BOP paid for to come in and do seminars, etc. I took part in two of these which I thouroughly enjoyed. There was also a weekly group I attended where you could also let off steam to avoid having an issue and things were held in confidence. There were also anger management, pain management, and non-violent communication groups available. Get involved in sports, education, read, do something, actually do as much as you can and your time will go quicker, I'm not going to say it'll fly by but if you sit there and do nothing not only will you become more and more depressed, but your time will seem like forever.

Upon your arrival
Alot of people wind up in the SHU until a bed opens up or if it's too late in the day to get their clothing, etc. After that you are assigned to a housing unit. I did some time when I was alot younger in a county jail and believe me Federal Prison is a major difference. When I came in, I was approached by several inmates, who offered shower shoes (which you need to avoid any foot diseases in the shower even though they are constantly cleaned), soap, shampoo, even writing materials. Some guys even offered food items. This is to be expected and don't be shy to take it. If and when you can give it back go ahead, but most will refuse it. These guys know what it's like to have nothing until you get going for yourself. Once you are there a bit, you will find yourself doing the same for other "newbies" it's just the code. Watch who you make friends with as it can make your time easy or hard. Most guys will warn you who to watch out for. Keep to yourself and keep your nose clean and you'll stay out of problems. I think I saw 4 maybe 5 fights the whole time I was there. Just don't piss anyone off. If someone confronts you or tries to make you back down from something, stand your ground, most times they'll just decide it's not worth the trouble, if you back down easy, you'll be considered a punk or an easy mark. Lock your stuff up in your locker, if you don't it will walk - you are in jail after all. When you go to chow, you'll notice certain groups eat in certain places. Try to eat with your group. If you see people are avoiding someone or he's sitting alone, you may want to think before sitting with him as there may be a reason nobody is there. You are judged by other inmates by who you hang with. Most of this stuff is common knowledge and should be applied to any institution you may wind up at. During group meetings or if you wind up seeing the doctors, do not reveal anything about your case, your charges or anything you may have gotten away with in the past as it will be used against you. I saw 2 people get jammed up during my time there.

I think I covered most of the stuff. If you need info or if there's something I didn't include, PM me or post and I'll try to give you an answer if I have one. Oh and one more thing, whether it's Wyatt, Devens or anywhere, when they call count, unless you are in a wheel chair, make sure you are stnding in your cell/cube or whatever because if you're not that is a guarenteed write up and you may get by with it if you are new or your first time but trust me they will toss you in SHU if you screw with their count. That I can tell you for sure. And don't sit down until they clear the count either, because sometimes they will call a recount over the radios and not the PA and you will be in Deep poo-poo if you are sitting down.

Last edited by joetnymedic; 09-15-2008 at 11:06 PM..
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Old 05-10-2010, 08:32 AM
kp169 kp169 is offline
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my brother just got transferred ft.devens... he hasn't called yet.. and i'm not even sure which facility he's in. they have the medical and the camp. and does anyone no how long it takes them to get a visit or make a fone call... please let me know..
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Old 05-10-2010, 08:46 AM
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John B. Webster John B. Webster is offline
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Unless he is in the SHU awaiting bed space, it should only be a few days. If in the SHU, it could take a week a more. Good luck and i know it is hard, but be patient.
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Old 05-10-2010, 10:42 AM
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just found out my brother is in the shu. does anyone no how long they will keep him there..
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Old 05-10-2010, 10:48 AM
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There is a huge range. I have seen it form anywhere form a couple of days to a month---depends on bed space. In 2001 I was awaiting bed space in the SHU for 28 days in Devens. I know this doesn't help much, and i am sorry, but there is no definitive time.
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Old 06-03-2011, 10:02 PM
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Why do they put inmates that are waiting for bed space in the SHU?
isnt that for inmates that are being disciplined?
So how long does an inmate wait for a bed?
And can they at least receive letters while they are in the SHU?
And if so whats the adress? would I mail it to the medical center or the camp?
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:06 AM
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Hi all, i am new to this...I have a question. I got an email from corrinks saying I have a message but there wasn't one there! Can an inmate look at previous messages for free if they no longer have money to send an email? I just dont know why it would be blank! anyone???
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:08 AM
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I read in a past post that you can send paper back books in the mail. Is this true? I thought they had to come directly from the company!!
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:23 PM
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No idea about corrlinks, sorry. Some bop prisons do allow paperback books and magazines to be sent from home, but the only ones I encountered were rated as low security. Inmates were also allowed to seal their outgoing letters there. If you check the A&O handbook on the bop facility locator web page, it will include the rules for mail.
http://www.bop.gov/DataSource/execute/dsFacilityLoc
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