Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > FOR FAMILY & FRIENDS > Raising Children with Parents in Prison
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Notices

Raising Children with Parents in Prison For the Parent left behind with children AND for the Children that have a parent inside. Discussion of unique challenges facing this group!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-01-2002, 12:28 AM
sherri13's Avatar
sherri13 sherri13 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 4,730
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 9 Posts
Default effects on children of incarcerated parents

this is a section in a research paper that i wrote that deals with the effects of incarceration of a parent on children of different age groups

just FYI



Children of Incarcerated Parents

Nearly 1.5 million children have a mother or father in prison. At the end of 1999, 1,498,800 children under the age of 18 had a parent in prison in this country (Bureau of Justice, 1999). There are an estimated 10 million children in the United States who have at some point in their lives had one or both parents incarcerated. (Reed, 1997). The American Correctional Association in 1990 reported that 50% of incarcerated juveniles have had a parent who has been incarcerated. Despite these alarming statistics, children of prisoners and other offenders have historically received very little attention from professionals or the public. It is our responsibility to acknowledge these forgotten children and to do what we can to reduce the profound risk the experience of parental incarceration presents for not only these children, but for our society (Johnston, 1995).

Research
“The cycle of parental crime, arrest, incarceration, and recidivism is particularly devastating for children, but no study has as yet directly observed a large sample of these children” (Reed, 1997, p. 157). Official instruments to collect information during arrest and adjudication do not exist. All of such information is obtained from the potentially inaccurate self-reports of offenders, and it is not clear that offenders can be legally



required to provide researchers with information regarding their families, due to confidentiality issues. (Johnston, 1995).
Notwithstanding the limited research, the few studies that have been done have yielded disconcerting results. Researchers have documented a number of behavioral, psychological, and educational problems in children who are traumatized by the arrest, separation, incarceration, and absence of a parent.

Effects on Children
Studies focusing on parental imprisonment and the children’s reactions to parental incarceration consistently substantiate the following: Regardless of the age of the child when a parent is incarcerated, there can be profound effects on that child’s development due primarily to the factors of trauma and parent-child separation. The effects on children have been frequently compared to the experiences of children dealing with divorce, abandonment or the death of a parent. Children of prisoners often report depression, anger, concentration problems, fear, sleep difficulties, guilt and flashbacks, symptoms
associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. (Greene, 2000; Locy, 1999; Seymour, 1998; Young & Smith, 2000; Virginia Commission on Youth, 1993).
The Child Welfare League of America identified common reactions of children separated from their parents, which included rejection, loss of identity, anger and guilt. In addition many children develop increased fear of emotional closeness and trusting that may lead to impaired interpersonal relationships as adults.
When a parent is incarcerated during the first year of a child’s life, parent-child bonding may prove impossible. The development of autonomy and initiative in children aged two to six may be damaged by the trauma of witnessing parental arrest and the loss of a parent through incarceration. They are much more likely to experience “survivor guilt”. Unlike infants, these young children have the ability to perceive and remember traumatic events but unlike older children and adolescents, they do not have the developmental skills to process such experiences. In addition, these children are often discouraged from talking about these experiences and this “conspiracy of silence” may have a lasting effect (Kamfner, 1995).
In middle childhood, ages seven to ten, children who have a parent incarcerated suffer the loss of a primary role model at a critical period of their lives. Some children are resilient enough to recover, but others with poor coping skills and little support may respond with reactive behaviors including: aggression, hypervigilance and other anxiety states, attention/concentration problems, and withdrawal. The development of these children’s abilities to work and cooperate with others, including academic achievement and emotional control, may be significantly impaired (Johnston, 1995; Reed, 1997).
In early adolescence, ages eleven to fourteen, although some children can utilize their internal and external resources to overcome the absence of a parent due to incarceration, many develop maladaptive behaviors in an attempt to gain control, and increase achievement and peer acceptance. Some of these behaviors include lying, stealing, gang activity, violence, promiscuity and engaging in substance abuse. These are their adaptive responses to the threatening environments in which they have been raised. These young adolescents may also reject limits on their behavior (Johnston, 1995; Reed, 1997).
When options for using adaptive patterns of coping behaviors do not exist, as with younger adolescents, older adolescents ages 15-18 will utilize maladaptive coping mechanisms, the long-term outcome being delinquency or crime. When this occurs, it produces intergenerational crime and incarceration.
According to the model for intergenerational crime and incarceration developed by the Center for Children of Incarcerated Parents, children exposed to continuing trauma produce emotional responses that without intervention, lead to reactive behavior and become fixed patterns that help children to cope, ultimately leading to crime and incarceration (Reed, 1997).
__________________
*SHERRI*
never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has

margaret mead

ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-01-2002, 09:34 AM
kali kali is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 107
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Sherri / others
does anyone know of a court case where childrens needs were put before punishment of the offender. I have looked but have found nothing. My attorney was hoing to find something to support his request for a downward departure besed on Brittanys emotional state of mind.
Kali
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-01-2002, 10:54 AM
Amelia's Avatar
Amelia Amelia is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 1,831
Thanks: 0
Thanked 45 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Sherri Thanks you for sharing this...Kali-In my opinion your daughter's well being is far more important than punishing you...but can the system comprehend that..who knows? I am praying that things work out for you.
__________________
Each day we are ONE DAY CLOSER to being together!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-01-2002, 08:42 PM
sherri13's Avatar
sherri13 sherri13 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 4,730
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 9 Posts
Default

KALI-I HAVE NEVER HEARD OF SUCH A CASE, BUT IF THERE ISN'T ONE, THERE SHOULD BE--IN FACT, THERE SHOULD BE A LOT OF CASES, HELL EVERY CASE THEY SHOULD CONSIDER THE CHILDREN!!! MAYBE YOURS AND YOUR DAUGHTERS COULD BE A LANDMARK CASE. GOD KNOWS WE NEED SOMETHING LIKE THAT TO HAPPEN. THEY NEED TO HAVE MORE ALTERNATIVE SANCTIONS, ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS.

SHERRI
__________________
*SHERRI*
never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has

margaret mead

ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-02-2002, 08:06 PM
Shortie's Avatar
Shortie Shortie is offline
PTO Junkie
 

Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Texas
Posts: 3,157
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 11 Posts
Default

we know that they are going to say they did not concider the children when they did the crime. They always flip it back on the offender.
__________________
Absence is to love
what wind is to fire
it extinguishes the small
it inflames the great


Shortie


Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-22-2002, 11:30 AM
bella's Avatar
bella bella is offline
Always Special to PTO!
 

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 4,280
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 14 Posts
Default

As you all know I do not have children. We have a niece and 2 nephews from his sister. His niece was two the first time she visited him and belive it or not she remembers it. She'll tell you about him wearing an orange suit. His sister and mother told her he was in college. That was about ten years ago. Now she is in school and since they want her to have a positive mind about school they told her the truth. Kids are so smart, when they told her she replied did he steal something and the police caught him. When she talks to him on the phone she tells him it is bad to steal and he should never do it again. Every time they are in the car and pass the local jail his nephew says Is he in there I want to see him. He knows that it is the jail because before all of this happened his father used to tell him if you do something bad the police will lock you in there for a long time. They miss him very much, the baby doesnt even know him. He is only a year old and has only seen him once, last month. Even though they are not his children it is very hard for him that they will age without him around. Every time I see them or speak to them they ask me when he is comming home. It's hard for me to tell them I don't know and have an explaination for it so I just tell them soon.
Just needed to vent. I cannot imagine your hurt for your children, but I definately can simpathize. I get a lump in my throat when I think of our niece and nephews.
M
__________________
" You know that place between asleep and awake, where you still remember dreaming? That's where I will always think of you." Tinkerbell


"Don't be dismayed at good-byes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-22-2002, 10:05 PM
Amelia's Avatar
Amelia Amelia is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 1,831
Thanks: 0
Thanked 45 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Isnt it terrible that children have to go through this too??!! My kids just dont undrestand why their dad has to be gone and why I cant bring him home. They cry because they want to hug and kiss him and can't. BUT I think it is so important for them to know the truth and your sister-in-law did the right thing. I worry so much what effect this is all going to have on them in the future--???--guess I needed to vent too!
__________________
Each day we are ONE DAY CLOSER to being together!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-15-2002, 10:09 AM
Amelia's Avatar
Amelia Amelia is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 1,831
Thanks: 0
Thanked 45 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Sherri I am usine the info you posted to try and get the DA to consider our children with this 15 year offer..thank you
__________________
Each day we are ONE DAY CLOSER to being together!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-16-2002, 07:49 AM
sherri13's Avatar
sherri13 sherri13 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 4,730
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 9 Posts
Default

HOPE IT WORKS AMELIA!
__________________
*SHERRI*
never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has

margaret mead

ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-16-2002, 01:31 PM
Tadessa Tadessa is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Effects On The Child

I am curious...how do you deal with the rejection that the child feels. My daughter is 9 and her father has been incarcerated off and on over half of her life....she now says that she doesn't have a father and that bothers me, but I don't want to discount her feelings. He asked her was she upset with him for being locked up again, and she told him that "basically, when you are locked up as much as you are, you just get use to it." I was totally dumbfounded. As a parent, is there anything I should be doing to help her? I will admit
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-16-2002, 02:27 PM
Budwoman Budwoman is offline
R.I.P.
 

Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 3,139
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 9 Posts
Default

CHILDREN ARE LITTLE ADULTS. THEY UNDERSTAND JUST WHAT THEY ARE SHOWN... YES, I AM SURE SHE IS BITTER. YOUR HUSBAND NEEDS TO TALK TO HER CONSTANTLY AND TELL HER HOW SORRY HE IS TO HAVE MESSED UP. HE NEEDS TO APOLOGIZE EACH AND EVERY TIME HE SEES HER. THEN, YOU NEED TO INSURE THAT SHE GETS SOME HELP TO UNDERSTAND HER ANGER AT HIM.... SHE IS HURT AND UPSET THAT HE IS IN PRISON AGAIN... SHE FEELS HE DID NOT LOVE HER ENOUGH TO NOT DO SOMETHING TO GO BACK.

YOU TOO CAN TALK WITH HER AND SHOW HER EXTRA LOVE AND UNDERSTANDING... THIS WILL HELP, BUT SHE DOES NEED TO SEE SOMEONE NOT IN THE FAMILY. SOMEONE WHO CAN LOOK AT HER OBJECTIVELY AND UNDERSTAND AND HELP HER RELEASE THIS ANGER SHE IS FEELING..

MY PRAYERS ARE WITH YOU AND HER

DONNA
__________________
Budwoman's account
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-16-2002, 07:07 PM
sherri13's Avatar
sherri13 sherri13 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 4,730
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 9 Posts
Default

I agree, Donna
__________________
*SHERRI*
never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has

margaret mead

ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-16-2002, 07:41 PM
Tadessa Tadessa is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

My daughter's father and I are not together and we haven't been together in the relationship-way since just before our daughter was born. I would like to think that she's a well adjusted child, but I don't like her attitude towards her father. I don't take her to visit and I know that's not fair to him, but I don't feel that for the next 9 years, I should have to take her back and forth to visit him. I guess part of my problem is the fact that his girlfriend was pregnant just before he got locked up, and he decided that he wanted to get his life together for the new child...I was very frustrated and angry about that, but I try not to let my feelings for him interfer with her. I'm also guilty of overindulging her because of his incarceration...anything she wants to try, I'm there shelling out the dollars or spending my time. Is this all a mistake on my part?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-16-2002, 07:52 PM
horsegal's Avatar
horsegal horsegal is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 1,272
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
Default

I know our son was withdrawn from his friends, he didn't want to go out and play, he didn't want them to come over and play, this past summer. (Kraig was arrested in July of 2001) But he is slowly coming out of that stage, and is now entering into a rebellious, and back talking stage. I have notified the school to have the councelor see him this year, I pray this helps. I try to be understanding, and not be harsh with him, but I also can't let him use this as an excuse to walk all over me either. Kraig and I both have talked with him, and tried to make this situation as painless as possible, but a 7 year old can't really comprehend not seeing his daddy out here. My son doesn't like to go to the visits at the prison, they are hard on all of us, but what can I do? This is the only way he has contact with him. It's just a hard situation all the way around.
__________________
SharonKraig

Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-20-2002, 02:52 PM
amyherring2002 amyherring2002 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 14
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

i dont know what to do about my son b/c he is 3 and my husband has only been out for like 9 mths of his life. He has seen him quite a few times and writes to him. my son often draws his daddy pictures and loves to go get the mail, but he seems very angry and he often sees me cry and he often cries saying that he misses daddy and he wants him to come home. i keep telling him soon and i told him that his daddy was on a trip b/c i feel he is too young to understand where he really is and i fear that it would scare him. Is this wrong?
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 09-20-2002, 03:59 PM
Amelia's Avatar
Amelia Amelia is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 1,831
Thanks: 0
Thanked 45 Times in 8 Posts
Default

I dont hink it is wrong, you know your child and you know what he can handle. My 3 year old little girl got so sick when Stephen went in that I told her the truth and then I took her to see him and she felt better...she even said to me that "NOw we found daddy , he isnt lost anymore" just keep talking to him about his feelings and let him know yours too....Shortie had an idea to send little presents in the mail to your child from hid daddy so he knows that dady hasnt forgotten him....good luck and if you ever need anything let me know!
__________________
Each day we are ONE DAY CLOSER to being together!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-16-2002, 09:24 PM
nanuu99022 nanuu99022 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: washington state
Posts: 93
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

the man i love has 3 grown kids and a 1 year old grand daughter. she will be about 14 when he gets out. his kids and
the baby mean the world to him. i don't know if his kids visit
him very often or not but i hope they do.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-09-2005, 11:11 AM
Sashurleigh Sashurleigh is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: hazel park, mi
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Resources

I am doing a research paper on this topic and I was wondering what your sources were. Would you be able to give those to me? Even if it was just the name of the books. My father was put in prison when I was young so I am doing research on how it effects other children because it interests me. Let me know. Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-06-2005, 10:31 PM
liz2403 liz2403 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Iowa in United States
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

My father was put in prison when I was 2 1/2 years old. Growing up I had a tough time, but getting to see him was the best situation. I went through a part of my life where I got to see him every weekend and I also went through a part of my life where I couldn't see him for a few years. My dad was sentenced to life in prison with no parole, so the chance of being a family without prison walls, was kind of out of the picture. Children that have parents in prison don't have to end up that way there selves. I am a very strong person who leads a crimeless life and has two children of my own. My father has been in prison for 20 years and as long as you are open with your child and the parent in prison is not going to be a negative influence in there life, then you should feel comfortable with knowing that children with parents in prison still have a great chance of turning out fine. My father couldn't be there for any of the milestones of my life, but I could always go to him and share with him ( and I still do ) what is happening in my life and how very much I love him and how he is a part of my life. He now has grandchildren that go there and see him. I have no shame in taking them too. If your child's parent is going to be getting out in this lifetime then just feel blessed, I will never have that oppurtunity. Your child will know that one day there parent will be out and they will be together. I never had that, and I am still okay.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10-06-2006, 11:40 AM
nmeis nmeis is offline
AThinLineBetweenLove&Hate
 

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: nebraska
Posts: 221
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

My father has been incarcerated since i was one the only thing i think has came of me is being a stronger woman who dosent relie on men yeah i went throgh a bad stage but have found my ways. The bad aspect is all my childrens fathers have been incacerated in prison and jailed manytimes and i dont want that to follow my children to. my daughters are to young to relize there fathers not around. But my sons father just got out and now my son dosent question weres my dad wich makes it alot easier. But its sad for my oldest daughter damn near everytime she goes around he fathers family she comes back with a story about him going to jail for this or that. My picking of men was not great but i really hope its not a situation that is going to follow them too.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 10-06-2006, 12:25 PM
Precious2 Precious2 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Illinois
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

TO NMEIS: I just read your post, and your situation sounds a lot like my nieces. Their dad was incarcerated at an early age, the first time he went to prison his oldest daughter was about 2 yrs old and he spent maybe ten years......then his second child was born and he stayed clean for many years.
Prison parents, especially dads don't realize what impact they have on their girls choosing men when they grow up and become young women...usually because they didn't have a father-figure, the girl will choose badly as in the case of both of my nieces....they both had children while in their teens, and made bad men choices, one chose a man who ended up incarcerated from the time she gave birth until the child reached his teen years, the other one chose a triflling man who would rather steal than work.
I'm happy to say that these young women are doing fine, they got themselves together and are leading fine lives raising their kids without the bad influence of their kids fathers.
So they are setting a fine example for their kids to follow. Just becasue a parent chooses to live a bad life doesn't mean the child is doomed to follow in his footsteps. Just keep a positive attitude and surround your kids with good, decent people who can be role models for them.
Good luck to you and your babies.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-10-2006, 08:27 AM
Toshacat's Avatar
Toshacat Toshacat is offline
Account Closed
 

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Mount Vernon Washington, USA
Posts: 892
Thanks: 3
Thanked 32 Times in 29 Posts
Default

Good paper, I can see my 18yr old in what you have written, she has had so much trauma all of her life from her mother who ignored and then discovering her step dad who died in prison wasn't her real dad and then mom shipped her off to her real dad because at the age of 8 she was driving her nuts. We kept her for 4 years and she went back to her mom for a visit stayed for another 3 came back all messed up and now dad is in jail awaiting a prison sentence and she is on the verge of collapse because she doesn't want to talk to anyone about her feelings.
Our 11 year old is completely different she tells me when she misses dad and get mad at him for being gone, and she was clinging with thinking that I would disappear too, but now she is almost back to her old self causing mayhem and mischief and even driving her sister nuts. She likes to talk about her dad and her older sister doesn't.
Thanks for the insight on behavoirs and what to look out for.
Toshacat
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-29-2006, 02:55 PM
delaney820225 delaney820225 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: tn Hamilton
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

That is so true. I have my sisters children and they are 3 and 5 and she was sentenced on oct. 5 2006 and they are taking it really hard.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 09-30-2007, 12:21 AM
sadness123 sadness123 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Kansas, United States
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

My father is incarnated and has been most of my life. I have lived with my dad's moma dn step dad since I was 3. I will be 14 in December. However many times he says sorry it can never be enough. He was here with me for 3 months and got to see me and then he just goes and gets locked up. I dont think that she is bitter. She is problay extremely mad and angery at him. And I dont see why they tell you they love you and promise you they are not going back to jail and then go back. It makes it twice as bad because a) It seems like they dont love you enough to quit and b) they are breaking their promise.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 09-30-2007, 01:52 AM
ilovedavid's Avatar
ilovedavid ilovedavid is offline
Our time is coming!
 

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: nebraska,usa
Posts: 240
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Default

My husband was just arrested on 9-11. I had to tell the kids the next what had happened cuz it was on the front page of the newspaper. It was the hardest thing I've ever had to do. My son didn't want to go to school, he's become withdrawn, he can't sleep well at night and he's not eating very good. He just keeps asking me when daddy's going to be home, and I don't have that answer yet. My 2nd oldest daughter doesn't speak of what happened at all. She doesn't ask about her dad or when he's coming home, mothing. My oldest daughter has become very angry, she's always fighting with her siblings and with me. She balk talks wvery time I tell her to do something, it's driving me nuts. My youngest, who is 2, well lately she's become very clingy and fussy. She hates it when I go anywhere and don't take her with me. In the beginning she was saying that daddy was at work, now she says she doesn't know where he's at. I would like to take them to see him, but I worry about the effect it will have on them. How are they going to handle being able to see and talk to him but not touch him and know that when we lwave he has to stay there. Visitation is so hard on me that I just don't think that I coukd put them thru that yet. I have also started my 2nd daughter and my son with a psychologist. My oldest has already been seeing her for a year, tho we were doing goos, only going once a month, now all three will be going weekly up until we know the sentecing, and then how ever longer it takes after that to see how well they adjust. If only I could take away all their pain and put it in me so that I was the only one to suffer.
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:40 PM.
Copyright © 2001- 2013 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics