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Missouri DOC - What You Need to Know Information relating to the Missouri Department of Corrections. Q&A for those new to the system should be posted here.

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Old 08-15-2006, 08:48 AM
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Default Missouri Sex Offender Program (MOSOP)

MOSOP-INFO

The director of the Department of Corrections is mandated (RSMo 589.040) to develop a program of treatment, education and rehabilitation for sexual assault offenders. By department policy, the successful completion of MOSOP is mandatory for a release prior to an inmate's sentence completion date. The MOSOP program, consisting of approximately 12 months of therapy, is provided at the Farmington Correctional Center for men and the Women’s Eastern Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center in Vandalia for females. The group for handicapped offenders is currently held at the Eastern Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center. The department has also instituted MOSOP treatment in its field services to probationers and parolees. Those who fail to successfully complete are required to complete their entire sentence and are not released prior to that date. In FY04, 222 offenders completed the Missouri Sex Offender Program.
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Old 08-15-2006, 10:08 AM
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Default More indepth info on MOSOP

Missouri Department of Corrections
Contact: James F. LaBundy, Chief of Sex Offender Services
Missouri Department of Corrections
Farmington Correctional Center
1012 West Columbia
Farmington, MO 63640
Phone: (573) 756-8001

Program Administrator:
James F. LaBundy, Chief of Sex Offender Services

Program Summary
The Missouri Sexual Offender Program (MoSOP) began in 1983, in response to Missouri’s 1980 Sexual Assault Prevention Act. In addition to treatment programming for incarcerated sex offenders, the Act mandates sexual assault prevention and counseling for public schools, as well as a State Center for the Prevention and Control of Sexual Assault. The statute also requires all offenders convicted of a sexual offense to complete a program of sexual offender treatment prior to being considered for early release.
MoSOP is based on a cognitive-behavioral approach, with an emphasis on relapse prevention.

Treatment is conducted in a group format that uses both psycho-educational and intensive treatment techniques. A therapeutic community is in preparation. A staff of 10 state employees provides programming in 2 facilities, one for males and one for females. Approximately 250 to 275 offenders are actively involved in treatment at any given time.
Missouri Sex Offender Services, part of the Missouri Department of Corrections, oversees institutional programming and has staff in the field to monitor aftercare providers and network with parole officers. Sex
Offender Services also includes an Assessment Unit, which contributes to pre-sentence investigations and screens and evaluates inmates who are potentially sexually violent predators.

The institutional program is structured in 2 phases, for an overall duration of 12 to 15 months. Because the institutional program is statutorily mandated, sex offenders cannot be screened from participation.
Inmates are typically placed in MoSOP within 12 to 18 months of their earliest presumptive release date, and progress through the following phases:

Phase I 3 months
A series of psycho-educational group sessions prepare the offender for more intensive treatment by covering the nature and goals of therapy as well as the structure of the program. Participants undergo a clinical interview and psychological testing.

Phase II 9 to 12 months
After placement in appropriate groups by MoSOP staff, participants enter the core therapy component of the program. Groups of 10 to 12 participants focus on personal responsibility, problem solving,
assertiveness/social skills, empathy skills, and relapse prevention. There is a strong emphasis on cognitive re-structuring.

Phase II groups are divided into three tracks to accommodate different verbal skills and personality styles, ranging from verbally deficient inmates who are passive or easily victimized, to inmates with no verbal deficiencies who are overtly aggressive and highly manipulative. (See “Program Structure” under “Program Description” below.)

Prison Sex Offender Population Identification
Missouri identifies incarcerated sex offenders differently from the general population, by current crime only.

Severity scale
The Missouri DOC does not have a severity scale for identified sex offenders.

Population Status
-Current total adult incarcerated population: Approximately 26,000
-Sex offender total: Approximately 3,500
-Percentage of total population identified as sex offenders: 13.5%

The number of sex offenders has increased from 2,268 in 1994 to 2,813 in 1999, an increase of 24%. Although the number increased, sex offenders as a percentage of the total population did not increase.

Prison Sex Offender Treatment Program
Governance Legislation
The Sexual Assault Prevention Act (Chapter 589.040 of the Missouri State Statutes) was passed in 1980. The Act mandates the following:
A program of treatment The Director of the Department of Corrections is required to develop a program of treatment, education, and rehabilitation for all imprisoned offenders serving sentences for sexual assault offenses.

Treatment requirement
All persons imprisoned by the Department of Corrections for sexual assault are required to successfully complete the treatment program to be considered for early release.

State Center for the Prevention and Control of Sexual Assault
The Director of the Department of Public Safety is required to establish the Center, to carry out:
1) A continuing study of sexual assault, including investigation of:
a) The effectiveness of existing state and local laws.
b) Any relationship between traditional legal and social attitudes toward sexual roles, the act of sexual assault, and the formulation of laws dealing with sexual assault.
c) The treatment of victims of sexual assault by law enforcement agencies, hospitals and other medical institutions, prosecutors, and the courts.
d) The causes of sexual assault.
e) The impact on the victim and the family of the victim.
f) Sexual assault in correctional institutions.
g) The actual incidence compared to the reported incidence and the reasons for any difference.
h) The effectiveness of existing programs designed to prevent and control sexual assault.
2) Assistance to qualified public and not for profit private entities for conducting research and demonstration projects.
3) An annual report of studies and demonstration projects, with appropriate recommendations, to submit to the governor, the chief justice of the supreme court, and the members of the general assembly.
4) Compilation and publication of training materials for sexual assault program personnel.
5) An information system regarding the prevention and control of sexual assault, the treatment and counseling of victims and their families, and the rehabilitation and medical treatment of offenders.
6) Publicizing of state and local programs for assisting victims.

Public school programs
The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is required to develop guidelines for teaching sexual assault prevention and counseling techniques for use by local school districts in establishing prevention education programs. Local boards of education are given discretion.

State Standards/Advisory Board
State-mandated identification policy
For the purpose of requiring sex offender treatment for incarcerated sex offenders, the definition of “sexual assault” is delineated in Chapter 589 (589.015) of the state statutes, as part of the Sexual Assault Prevention Act.

Advisory board/sex offender treatment entity
There is no state-mandated policy that creates an advisory board, and no state-mandated policy that creates a sex offender treatment board/entity that sets standards and requirements for treatment. Standards of Practice use ATSA guidelines.

Stakeholders influencing the program
Stakeholders outside the DOC who influence the program include:
· The legislature
· The Governor’s office

Program Policies

Treatment requirement
All offenders who are identified as sex offenders and assessed for sex offender treatment are required to go to treatment.

Results of denial or refusal of treatment
If an offender denies a sex offending problem or refuses treatment, the offender:
· Has his conditional release date removed
· Serves his maximum sentence
· May be referred for civil commitment

The DOC has written policies for refusal of treatment.

Implications for identified sex offenders
In addition to being classified for treatment, an offender identified as a sex offender under department policy is:
· Restricted to certain security level facilities
· Excluded from outside work crews
· Expected to participate in sex offender treatment

Visitation policy
The visitation policy for sex offenders at the SOTP facility prohibits those with victims under 18 from having child visitors, and prohibits visits with victims even if they are related to the offender. In the near future, all offenders not completing SOTP will be non-contact visits.

Program Description/Placement
State statute requires all offenders convicted of a sexual offense to complete a program of sexual offender treatment prior to being considered for early release. Procedures set forth in the department manual are designed to ensure consistent identification, evaluation, and treatment, in order to facilitate opportunities for sexual offenders to 1) understand how their own perceptions and decision making processes have led to their sexual offenses, 2) take responsibility for their past behavior and their need to change, and 3) learn alternative coping skills and behaviors that will lead to the prevention of inappropriate sexual behavior upon release.

This approach is based on the theoretical concepts and therapeutic techniques of responsibility therapy, adapted from Yochelson and Samenow. To emphasize personal responsibility, the program also places
stringent conduct and participation requirements on all MoSOP participants.

Cognitive behavioral-based treatment is conducted in a group format that uses both psycho-educational and intensive treatment techniques, with an emphasis on relapse prevention. A therapeutic community is in
preparation.

Dedicated facility
MoSOP does not have a dedicated facility. Treatment for men is provided at Farmington Correctional Center, and treatment for women is provided at Women’s Eastern Reception and Diagnostic Correctional Center in Vandalia. A section at Missouri Eastern Correctional Center in Pacific, Missouri addresses offenders with handicaps.

Assessment or testing tools
Assessment tools used for inmate placement into the treatment program include:
· ABEL Screen
· Hare PCL-SV
· WRAT 3 (to determine low-functioning offenders)
· Shipley and medical evaluations done at Reception/Diagnostic Center

Types of offenders
The program is designed to accept the following types of offenders:
· Normal intellectual and socially functioning offenders
· Females
· Developmentally disabled
· Handicapped and/or emotionally impaired

Intake
The MoSOP takes sex offenders into the program according to the following criteria:
· The priority on the list
· Short time to supervised release
· Short time to sentence discharge

Theoretically, all sex offenders not within 12 to 18 months of release are on the program waiting list.

Core curriculum
The curriculum for the treatment program includes:
· Educational courses
· Cognitive behavior therapy
· Group counseling
· Daily phenomenological reports

Program structure
Missouri Sex Offender Services, part of the Missouri Department of Corrections, oversees MoSOP, which is for the prison population only. (See “Post-release” below for Missouri Sex Offender Services involvement in aftercare.) The program is designed only for sex offenders who are willing to participate in treatment. Participants do not necessarily have to be amenable to treatment.

Because treatment is statutorily mandated, sex offenders cannot be screened from participation. Regardless of verbal intellectual abilities, motivation for treatment, mental health issues or physical limitations, all incarcerated sexual offenders must be offered treatment. Participants are required to successfully complete Phase I to be considered for Phase II, and must successfully complete Phase II to be considered for early release.

Phase I 3 Months
Phase I consists of a series of psycho-educational group sessions that provide an orientation to the concepts, requirements, and structure of the more intensive treatment in Phase II. Sessions are conducted by corrections caseworkers and therapists who are trained in the principles and requirements of the program. Homework is assigned to ensure that participants possess the basics necessary for moving into core treatment.
During this phase, participants undergo psychological testing consisting of the instruments mentioned previously. Following completion of Phase I, a Phase II therapist and a caseworker conduct a team interview of each participant. Based on psychological assessments, materials gathered prior to the interview and the interview itself, MoSOP staff determine the appropriate Phase II group placement.

The offender begins Phase II treatment in the assigned group within one month. In addition to providing information for evaluation and treatment planning for individual offenders, the clinical interview and psychological tests generate data for program development and research.

Phase II 9 to 12 months
Phase II provides the core therapy component of the program, focusing on the individual. Phase II therapists possess a minimum of a master’s degree and are trained in the treatment of sex offenders. They are licensed or license-eligible, under supervision for licensure. The Clinical Supervisor provides oversight.

Groups are divided into three tracks to accommodate different personality styles:
Plan A groups are designed to treat offenders who have verbal intellectual deficiencies, serious mental illnesses, or are passive or easily victimized.

Plan B groups are designed for individuals who possess no verbal intellectual deficiencies and use rationalization or intellectualization to minimize their offense. These offenders are passively aggressive rather than overtly physically aggressive.

Plan C groups are designed for individuals who possess no verbal intellectual deficiencies and who blame others for their offense. They are often overtly aggressive and highly manipulative. These individuals usually possess lengthy criminal histories and are high in the constructs of
psychopathy, showing no empathy or remorse for their victims.

Ideally, Phase II groups are composed of 10 to 12 members. As space becomes available in a group, new members are added. This allows for more advanced group members to demonstrate their understanding and insights to new group members.

Phase II treatment includes the following components:
Problem solving focuses on the basic steps of interpersonal problem-solving and how to apply these.

Assertiveness training involves learning to engage in more assertive communication, but also focuses on developing social skills.

Empathy development requires participants to demonstrate an increased ability to empathize, in the form of a victim empathy report.

Relapse prevention culminates in each participant developing a chart of his/her deviant cycle and formulating a relapse prevention plan.

During the 9 to 12 months of Phase II, offenders must participate in a minimum number of hours per week. Most offenders are involved in the program for 12 months.

Assessment Unit
In addition to institutional programming and aftercare oversight (see “Post-release” below), Missouri Sex Offender Services administers an Assessment Unit, which provides the following services:

Pre-sentence investigations
As an adjunct to pre-sentence investigations, the Assessment Unit conducts a 120-day intensive evaluation of offenders sent by the court. This assessment assists judges in placing offenders on probation or into incarceration.

Sexually violent predator processing
The Assessment Unit screens all offenders who do not successfully complete MoSOP for their potential as “Sexually Violent Predators,” as defined by statute. If the screening appears to be positive, the
Assessment Unit conducts an “End of Confinement” evaluation to determine whether the offender may appear to meet the requirements of a “Potentially Sexually Violent Predator,” to be referred for a complete forensic evaluation.

Post-release
If an individual who has successfully completed MoSOP is paroled, the Board of Probation and Parole may require the offender, as a condition of parole, to participate in sexual offender treatment or relapse prevention group in the community. Contracted community providers, who design the aftercare component, conduct post-release aftercare. Missouri Sex Offender Services have staff in the field to monitor providers and network with parole officers. Sex offenders are eligible for community corrections or work release programs only after successful completion of the treatment program. Community Corrections Sex Offender Area Treatment Coordinators are under Missouri Sex Offender Services.

Completion/Failure
It is possible for an offender to complete all phases of sex offender treatment. 30% to 35% of placements successfully complete the treatment program. Phase II has the greatest failure rate, a rate of 65%
to 70%. Phase I helps to officially segregate those offenders who refuse treatment.

Reasons for expulsion
An offender might be expelled from the program for any of the following reasons:
· Failure to progress
· Assaultive behaviors
· Sexual misconduct
· Most major conduct violations

Consequences of failure
As a consequence for failing the program, the inmate participant is subject to loss of time toward reducing his sentence.

Staff Roles and Authority

Assessment for identification and treatment plan
Offenders are assessed for identification and treatment planning by sex offender program staff at the facility.

Authority
Program staff can make a discretionary change to treatment. The state has identified security levels for prison facilities. The unit responsible for placement cannot place a sex offender in Levels 1 through 3; only Level 4 (medium-maximum security) and Level 5 (maximum security) are permissible.

The unit responsible for facility placement and the program staff interact when placing sex offenders at certain facilities.

Assessment

Tests and assessment tools
To measure progress in the program, the MoSOP uses clinical interviews. Outcome measures are currently under study. Program-developed tools for measuring offender progress The program has not developed its own set of tools for measuring offender progress. This is also under study.
Internal system for tracking program effectiveness The program does not have an internal system for tracking program effectiveness.

Release Authority

Parole Board
The parole board is not reluctant to release sex offenders deemed low risk to re-offend.

Rate of release
Most sex offenders do not discharge their sentence in prison prior to release. Release rates are delineated below.
Sentence discharge: 32%
Parole: 18%
Conditional (mandatory) release: 23%
Probation: 19%
Other/death: 8%

Staffing Issues
A total of 8 staff provides treatment in two facilities, one for men and one for women. All are state employees. The department has the discretion to set the starting salary for all program staff, trying to adhere to local standards.

Training, licensing, and certification requirements
Treatment staff must be licensed or license-eligible LCSW’s or LPC’s.
Phase II therapists possess a minimum of a master’s degree and are trained in the treatment of sex offenders.

Staffing of treatment groups
Groups of 10 to 12 participants are facilitated by 1 counselor.

Recruitment and retention
The program has had difficulty recruiting doctoral level psychologists for rural area facilities. However, the program has had no recent staff turnover problems.

Program Costs
Total overall DOC budget: Approximately $500,000,000
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And your faith is broken
Even as the eyes are closing
Do it with a heart wide open

Say what you need to say


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Old 08-19-2006, 08:05 PM
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thanks for the info
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Old 08-21-2006, 12:17 PM
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Yes, thanks very much for the info.

Lisa
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Old 08-21-2006, 12:30 PM
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My pleasure. I hope it helps someone!
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And your faith is broken
Even as the eyes are closing
Do it with a heart wide open

Say what you need to say


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Old 05-10-2007, 08:37 PM
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thanks for the information i have a loved one who will be going through the mosop program soon and i'm really worried about him.. i had no clue how the program worked or anything so it's nice having a little bit of information about it.
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Old 05-11-2007, 06:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hisnirvanajunki
thanks for the information i have a loved one who will be going through the mosop program soon and i'm really worried about him.. i had no clue how the program worked or anything so it's nice having a little bit of information about it.

I am happy that this was helpful to you! Good luck to him and if he just follows the program (and it will be hard) he will do great!
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Old 06-03-2009, 09:33 AM
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The Easy Part Is Being In, The Hard Part Is When You Get Out. Home Plan,Job,Child Support,No Car, No Family In Missouri, Having To Visit PO, Now This Is Going Around Son Called This Morning Wanting Me To Find Out If I Can Find Out If They Are Stopping The Moso program, and Having Them Take It And Pay For It On The Outside, Christy Can You Help Me With This. Thanks
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Old 07-04-2009, 12:42 AM
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Default Mosop

I've posted all over the place, but I'm posting here as well. I completed the MOSOP program and am happy to answer general and most specific questions. I completed the program at Farmington and then did "MOSOP Lite" a year and seven or so months on the street. I will answer any and all questions, help with any work required, anything I can do to help.

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Old 02-03-2010, 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Mycosyco View Post
I've posted all over the place, but I'm posting here as well. I completed the MOSOP program and am happy to answer general and most specific questions. I completed the program at Farmington and then did "MOSOP Lite" a year and seven or so months on the street. I will answer any and all questions, help with any work required, anything I can do to help.

Thank you to everyone involved in Prison Talk, you see the other side of the coin!

-Myco-
Could you tell me how long it takes for one to start treatment after he has left fulton diagnostic center, and I heard there is a center in booneville, on a 5 year sentence do you serve 2 months on every year?
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Old 02-18-2010, 04:55 PM
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There is not a sex offender program at Booneville, to my knowledge. The waiting list is quite long to get into the program and takes a while. As for 2 months for every year - depends on many factors; crime, length of sentence, madatory minimums, his behavior.
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Old 03-22-2010, 09:09 AM
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okay so let me see if I got this right, someone with a victim under 18, cant have their kids visit if they under 18. thats got to be hard on the kids..
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Old 03-22-2010, 05:34 PM
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myheart-that is true when they are in the MoSop program but I dont know if they have the same restrictions before they go into the treatment facility.

His caseworker can clarify this for him though.
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Old 06-08-2010, 04:05 PM
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I've posted all over the place, but I'm posting here as well. I completed the MOSOP program and am happy to answer general and most specific questions. I completed the program at Farmington and then did "MOSOP Lite" a year and seven or so months on the street. I will answer any and all questions, help with any work required, anything I can do to help.

Thank you to everyone involved in Prison Talk, you see the other side of the coin!

-Myco-
Hi my son in law is in farmington, and scheduled to start mosop in july once he starts is it a continal program? and how long is it, and when he is thru should that be around his conditional release date, also my daughter his wife lives in nebraska, after his release will moving to nebraska be a problem for him?
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Old 06-08-2010, 09:57 PM
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The Easy Part Is Being In, The Hard Part Is When You Get Out. Home Plan,Job,Child Support,No Car, No Family In Missouri, Having To Visit PO, Now This Is Going Around Son Called This Morning Wanting Me To Find Out If I Can Find Out If They Are Stopping The Moso program, and Having Them Take It And Pay For It On The Outside, Christy Can You Help Me With This. Thanks
I don't know where you're located but I'm in the process of buying a fourplex and I do rent to SO;s. I'm in KC.
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Old 06-09-2010, 11:08 AM
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Missouri Department of Corrections
Contact: James F. LaBundy, Chief of Sex Offender Services
Missouri Department of Corrections
Farmington Correctional Center
1012 West Columbia
Farmington, MO 63640
Phone: (573) 756-8001

Program Administrator:
James F. LaBundy, Chief of Sex Offender Services

Program Summary
The Missouri Sexual Offender Program (MoSOP) began in 1983, in response to Missouri’s 1980 Sexual Assault Prevention Act. In addition to treatment programming for incarcerated sex offenders, the Act mandates sexual assault prevention and counseling for public schools, as well as a State Center for the Prevention and Control of Sexual Assault. The statute also requires all offenders convicted of a sexual offense to complete a program of sexual offender treatment prior to being considered for early release.
MoSOP is based on a cognitive-behavioral approach, with an emphasis on relapse prevention.

Treatment is conducted in a group format that uses both psycho-educational and intensive treatment techniques. A therapeutic community is in preparation. A staff of 10 state employees provides programming in 2 facilities, one for males and one for females. Approximately 250 to 275 offenders are actively involved in treatment at any given time.
Missouri Sex Offender Services, part of the Missouri Department of Corrections, oversees institutional programming and has staff in the field to monitor aftercare providers and network with parole officers. Sex
Offender Services also includes an Assessment Unit, which contributes to pre-sentence investigations and screens and evaluates inmates who are potentially sexually violent predators.

The institutional program is structured in 2 phases, for an overall duration of 12 to 15 months. Because the institutional program is statutorily mandated, sex offenders cannot be screened from participation.
Inmates are typically placed in MoSOP within 12 to 18 months of their earliest presumptive release date, and progress through the following phases:

Phase I 3 months
A series of psycho-educational group sessions prepare the offender for more intensive treatment by covering the nature and goals of therapy as well as the structure of the program. Participants undergo a clinical interview and psychological testing.

Phase II 9 to 12 months
After placement in appropriate groups by MoSOP staff, participants enter the core therapy component of the program. Groups of 10 to 12 participants focus on personal responsibility, problem solving,
assertiveness/social skills, empathy skills, and relapse prevention. There is a strong emphasis on cognitive re-structuring.

Phase II groups are divided into three tracks to accommodate different verbal skills and personality styles, ranging from verbally deficient inmates who are passive or easily victimized, to inmates with no verbal deficiencies who are overtly aggressive and highly manipulative. (See “Program Structure” under “Program Description” below.)

Prison Sex Offender Population Identification
Missouri identifies incarcerated sex offenders differently from the general population, by current crime only.

Severity scale
The Missouri DOC does not have a severity scale for identified sex offenders.

Population Status
-Current total adult incarcerated population: Approximately 26,000
-Sex offender total: Approximately 3,500
-Percentage of total population identified as sex offenders: 13.5%

The number of sex offenders has increased from 2,268 in 1994 to 2,813 in 1999, an increase of 24%. Although the number increased, sex offenders as a percentage of the total population did not increase.

Prison Sex Offender Treatment Program
Governance Legislation
The Sexual Assault Prevention Act (Chapter 589.040 of the Missouri State Statutes) was passed in 1980. The Act mandates the following:
A program of treatment The Director of the Department of Corrections is required to develop a program of treatment, education, and rehabilitation for all imprisoned offenders serving sentences for sexual assault offenses.

Treatment requirement
All persons imprisoned by the Department of Corrections for sexual assault are required to successfully complete the treatment program to be considered for early release.

State Center for the Prevention and Control of Sexual Assault
The Director of the Department of Public Safety is required to establish the Center, to carry out:
1) A continuing study of sexual assault, including investigation of:
a) The effectiveness of existing state and local laws.
b) Any relationship between traditional legal and social attitudes toward sexual roles, the act of sexual assault, and the formulation of laws dealing with sexual assault.
c) The treatment of victims of sexual assault by law enforcement agencies, hospitals and other medical institutions, prosecutors, and the courts.
d) The causes of sexual assault.
e) The impact on the victim and the family of the victim.
f) Sexual assault in correctional institutions.
g) The actual incidence compared to the reported incidence and the reasons for any difference.
h) The effectiveness of existing programs designed to prevent and control sexual assault.
2) Assistance to qualified public and not for profit private entities for conducting research and demonstration projects.
3) An annual report of studies and demonstration projects, with appropriate recommendations, to submit to the governor, the chief justice of the supreme court, and the members of the general assembly.
4) Compilation and publication of training materials for sexual assault program personnel.
5) An information system regarding the prevention and control of sexual assault, the treatment and counseling of victims and their families, and the rehabilitation and medical treatment of offenders.
6) Publicizing of state and local programs for assisting victims.

Public school programs
The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is required to develop guidelines for teaching sexual assault prevention and counseling techniques for use by local school districts in establishing prevention education programs. Local boards of education are given discretion.

State Standards/Advisory Board
State-mandated identification policy
For the purpose of requiring sex offender treatment for incarcerated sex offenders, the definition of “sexual assault” is delineated in Chapter 589 (589.015) of the state statutes, as part of the Sexual Assault Prevention Act.

Advisory board/sex offender treatment entity
There is no state-mandated policy that creates an advisory board, and no state-mandated policy that creates a sex offender treatment board/entity that sets standards and requirements for treatment. Standards of Practice use ATSA guidelines.

Stakeholders influencing the program
Stakeholders outside the DOC who influence the program include:
· The legislature
· The Governor’s office

Program Policies

Treatment requirement
All offenders who are identified as sex offenders and assessed for sex offender treatment are required to go to treatment.

Results of denial or refusal of treatment
If an offender denies a sex offending problem or refuses treatment, the offender:
· Has his conditional release date removed
· Serves his maximum sentence
· May be referred for civil commitment

The DOC has written policies for refusal of treatment.

Implications for identified sex offenders
In addition to being classified for treatment, an offender identified as a sex offender under department policy is:
· Restricted to certain security level facilities
· Excluded from outside work crews
· Expected to participate in sex offender treatment

Visitation policy
The visitation policy for sex offenders at the SOTP facility prohibits those with victims under 18 from having child visitors, and prohibits visits with victims even if they are related to the offender. In the near future, all offenders not completing SOTP will be non-contact visits.

Program Description/Placement
State statute requires all offenders convicted of a sexual offense to complete a program of sexual offender treatment prior to being considered for early release. Procedures set forth in the department manual are designed to ensure consistent identification, evaluation, and treatment, in order to facilitate opportunities for sexual offenders to 1) understand how their own perceptions and decision making processes have led to their sexual offenses, 2) take responsibility for their past behavior and their need to change, and 3) learn alternative coping skills and behaviors that will lead to the prevention of inappropriate sexual behavior upon release.

This approach is based on the theoretical concepts and therapeutic techniques of responsibility therapy, adapted from Yochelson and Samenow. To emphasize personal responsibility, the program also places
stringent conduct and participation requirements on all MoSOP participants.

Cognitive behavioral-based treatment is conducted in a group format that uses both psycho-educational and intensive treatment techniques, with an emphasis on relapse prevention. A therapeutic community is in
preparation.

Dedicated facility
MoSOP does not have a dedicated facility. Treatment for men is provided at Farmington Correctional Center, and treatment for women is provided at Women’s Eastern Reception and Diagnostic Correctional Center in Vandalia. A section at Missouri Eastern Correctional Center in Pacific, Missouri addresses offenders with handicaps.

Assessment or testing tools
Assessment tools used for inmate placement into the treatment program include:
· ABEL Screen
· Hare PCL-SV
· WRAT 3 (to determine low-functioning offenders)
· Shipley and medical evaluations done at Reception/Diagnostic Center

Types of offenders
The program is designed to accept the following types of offenders:
· Normal intellectual and socially functioning offenders
· Females
· Developmentally disabled
· Handicapped and/or emotionally impaired

Intake
The MoSOP takes sex offenders into the program according to the following criteria:
· The priority on the list
· Short time to supervised release
· Short time to sentence discharge

Theoretically, all sex offenders not within 12 to 18 months of release are on the program waiting list.

Core curriculum
The curriculum for the treatment program includes:
· Educational courses
· Cognitive behavior therapy
· Group counseling
· Daily phenomenological reports

Program structure
Missouri Sex Offender Services, part of the Missouri Department of Corrections, oversees MoSOP, which is for the prison population only. (See “Post-release” below for Missouri Sex Offender Services involvement in aftercare.) The program is designed only for sex offenders who are willing to participate in treatment. Participants do not necessarily have to be amenable to treatment.

Because treatment is statutorily mandated, sex offenders cannot be screened from participation. Regardless of verbal intellectual abilities, motivation for treatment, mental health issues or physical limitations, all incarcerated sexual offenders must be offered treatment. Participants are required to successfully complete Phase I to be considered for Phase II, and must successfully complete Phase II to be considered for early release.

Phase I 3 Months
Phase I consists of a series of psycho-educational group sessions that provide an orientation to the concepts, requirements, and structure of the more intensive treatment in Phase II. Sessions are conducted by corrections caseworkers and therapists who are trained in the principles and requirements of the program. Homework is assigned to ensure that participants possess the basics necessary for moving into core treatment.
During this phase, participants undergo psychological testing consisting of the instruments mentioned previously. Following completion of Phase I, a Phase II therapist and a caseworker conduct a team interview of each participant. Based on psychological assessments, materials gathered prior to the interview and the interview itself, MoSOP staff determine the appropriate Phase II group placement.

The offender begins Phase II treatment in the assigned group within one month. In addition to providing information for evaluation and treatment planning for individual offenders, the clinical interview and psychological tests generate data for program development and research.

Phase II 9 to 12 months
Phase II provides the core therapy component of the program, focusing on the individual. Phase II therapists possess a minimum of a master’s degree and are trained in the treatment of sex offenders. They are licensed or license-eligible, under supervision for licensure. The Clinical Supervisor provides oversight.

Groups are divided into three tracks to accommodate different personality styles:
Plan A groups are designed to treat offenders who have verbal intellectual deficiencies, serious mental illnesses, or are passive or easily victimized.

Plan B groups are designed for individuals who possess no verbal intellectual deficiencies and use rationalization or intellectualization to minimize their offense. These offenders are passively aggressive rather than overtly physically aggressive.

Plan C groups are designed for individuals who possess no verbal intellectual deficiencies and who blame others for their offense. They are often overtly aggressive and highly manipulative. These individuals usually possess lengthy criminal histories and are high in the constructs of
psychopathy, showing no empathy or remorse for their victims.

Ideally, Phase II groups are composed of 10 to 12 members. As space becomes available in a group, new members are added. This allows for more advanced group members to demonstrate their understanding and insights to new group members.

Phase II treatment includes the following components:
Problem solving focuses on the basic steps of interpersonal problem-solving and how to apply these.

Assertiveness training involves learning to engage in more assertive communication, but also focuses on developing social skills.

Empathy development requires participants to demonstrate an increased ability to empathize, in the form of a victim empathy report.

Relapse prevention culminates in each participant developing a chart of his/her deviant cycle and formulating a relapse prevention plan.

During the 9 to 12 months of Phase II, offenders must participate in a minimum number of hours per week. Most offenders are involved in the program for 12 months.

Assessment Unit
In addition to institutional programming and aftercare oversight (see “Post-release” below), Missouri Sex Offender Services administers an Assessment Unit, which provides the following services:

Pre-sentence investigations
As an adjunct to pre-sentence investigations, the Assessment Unit conducts a 120-day intensive evaluation of offenders sent by the court. This assessment assists judges in placing offenders on probation or into incarceration.

Sexually violent predator processing
The Assessment Unit screens all offenders who do not successfully complete MoSOP for their potential as “Sexually Violent Predators,” as defined by statute. If the screening appears to be positive, the
Assessment Unit conducts an “End of Confinement” evaluation to determine whether the offender may appear to meet the requirements of a “Potentially Sexually Violent Predator,” to be referred for a complete forensic evaluation.

Post-release
If an individual who has successfully completed MoSOP is paroled, the Board of Probation and Parole may require the offender, as a condition of parole, to participate in sexual offender treatment or relapse prevention group in the community. Contracted community providers, who design the aftercare component, conduct post-release aftercare. Missouri Sex Offender Services have staff in the field to monitor providers and network with parole officers. Sex offenders are eligible for community corrections or work release programs only after successful completion of the treatment program. Community Corrections Sex Offender Area Treatment Coordinators are under Missouri Sex Offender Services.

Completion/Failure
It is possible for an offender to complete all phases of sex offender treatment. 30% to 35% of placements successfully complete the treatment program. Phase II has the greatest failure rate, a rate of 65%
to 70%. Phase I helps to officially segregate those offenders who refuse treatment.

Reasons for expulsion
An offender might be expelled from the program for any of the following reasons:
· Failure to progress
· Assaultive behaviors
· Sexual misconduct
· Most major conduct violations

Consequences of failure
As a consequence for failing the program, the inmate participant is subject to loss of time toward reducing his sentence.

Staff Roles and Authority

Assessment for identification and treatment plan
Offenders are assessed for identification and treatment planning by sex offender program staff at the facility.

Authority
Program staff can make a discretionary change to treatment. The state has identified security levels for prison facilities. The unit responsible for placement cannot place a sex offender in Levels 1 through 3; only Level 4 (medium-maximum security) and Level 5 (maximum security) are permissible.

The unit responsible for facility placement and the program staff interact when placing sex offenders at certain facilities.

Assessment

Tests and assessment tools
To measure progress in the program, the MoSOP uses clinical interviews. Outcome measures are currently under study. Program-developed tools for measuring offender progress The program has not developed its own set of tools for measuring offender progress. This is also under study.
Internal system for tracking program effectiveness The program does not have an internal system for tracking program effectiveness.

Release Authority

Parole Board
The parole board is not reluctant to release sex offenders deemed low risk to re-offend.

Rate of release
Most sex offenders do not discharge their sentence in prison prior to release. Release rates are delineated below.
Sentence discharge: 32%
Parole: 18%
Conditional (mandatory) release: 23%
Probation: 19%
Other/death: 8%

Staffing Issues
A total of 8 staff provides treatment in two facilities, one for men and one for women. All are state employees. The department has the discretion to set the starting salary for all program staff, trying to adhere to local standards.

Training, licensing, and certification requirements
Treatment staff must be licensed or license-eligible LCSW’s or LPC’s.
Phase II therapists possess a minimum of a master’s degree and are trained in the treatment of sex offenders.

Staffing of treatment groups
Groups of 10 to 12 participants are facilitated by 1 counselor.

Recruitment and retention
The program has had difficulty recruiting doctoral level psychologists for rural area facilities. However, the program has had no recent staff turnover problems.

Program Costs
Total overall DOC budget: Approximately $500,000,000
Thank You Christy For The Info.
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Old 01-16-2011, 10:27 PM
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There are two phases to MoSOP treatment. The first phase begins about 16 to 18 months before the conditional release date. They must complete both phase one and two in order to be released.

Some argue that as a requirement to graduating MoSOP, inmates are required to confess to other crimes besides what they were actually convicted of doing, and if they do not, they will not be released.

However, not too long ago, I received an email from a high ranking DOC official that was also sent to the MoSOP Director stating that inmates do NOT have to confess to crimes they have not been convicted by a court of law, in order to graduate the program.
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Old 02-06-2011, 05:39 PM
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Thats funny that you sayn that because the parole board told my love ones a few days ago that he had to discuss things that were dropped if not then he will not be let free
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Old 04-13-2011, 01:17 PM
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Is there a site where I can see what the registration guidelines are, after he gets out of prison? How many years hewill be on, etc.??
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Old 06-21-2011, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mycosyco View Post
I've posted all over the place, but I'm posting here as well. I completed the MOSOP program and am happy to answer general and most specific questions. I completed the program at Farmington and then did "MOSOP Lite" a year and seven or so months on the street. I will answer any and all questions, help with any work required, anything I can do to help.

Thank you to everyone involved in Prison Talk, you see the other side of the coin!

-Myco-
My Son Is Half Way Thru The MOSOP , I"m Hoping He Can Come Back To Georgia, He Has No Family There In Missouri, And We Can Help Him Better If He Was Here, How Do We Go About Getting A Trafer For Him, Does He Have To Do This, And How Many Months Brfore.We Have Him A Job Waiting, A Home., Here. Thanks For Any Help And All Help.
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Old 07-17-2011, 05:08 PM
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Hello,

My husband will be coming home 9/26/2011 and I am desparately seeking a place to rent for him in KC. Initially he can't come to our home because I have our grandkids here. I am employed after a long stretch of unemployment and he already has a job lined up.
I need to establish something immediately, because his home plan review will be by the end of this month.
I you or anyone else out there can help, I would greatly appreciate it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveOnlineNKS View Post
I don't know where you're located but I'm in the process of buying a fourplex and I do rent to SO;s. I'm in KC.
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  #22  
Old 07-17-2011, 05:33 PM
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This is awesome information for family and loved ones. My husband went throuth the MOSOP program 2005/2006. I searched high and low for information and couldn't find any at that time.
For those loved ones that haven't experienced this yet or have just begun:
It is a very intense program, but it was the best program my husband had ever been through. It pushed him to do the deep seated soul searching he needed to do and to come to terms with everything. It gave him the tools he needs to succeed moving forward. We've been married 30 years, 14 when he went to prison. The level of honesty and integrity he now has are priceless to me and it is from his success in this program. For me it was literally answer to many years of prayer.
My gratitude goes out to those who designed it and those who facilitate it.
The Phase III once they are on parole could use a lot of help, but the program inside, as far as I'm concerned is wonderful.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Christy View Post
Missouri Department of Corrections
Contact: James F. LaBundy, Chief of Sex Offender Services
Missouri Department of Corrections
Farmington Correctional Center
1012 West Columbia
Farmington, MO 63640
Phone: (573) 756-8001

Program Administrator:
James F. LaBundy, Chief of Sex Offender Services

Program Summary
The Missouri Sexual Offender Program (MoSOP) began in 1983, in response to Missouri’s 1980 Sexual Assault Prevention Act. In addition to treatment programming for incarcerated sex offenders, the Act mandates sexual assault prevention and counseling for public schools, as well as a State Center for the Prevention and Control of Sexual Assault. The statute also requires all offenders convicted of a sexual offense to complete a program of sexual offender treatment prior to being considered for early release.
MoSOP is based on a cognitive-behavioral approach, with an emphasis on relapse prevention.

Treatment is conducted in a group format that uses both psycho-educational and intensive treatment techniques. A therapeutic community is in preparation. A staff of 10 state employees provides programming in 2 facilities, one for males and one for females. Approximately 250 to 275 offenders are actively involved in treatment at any given time.
Missouri Sex Offender Services, part of the Missouri Department of Corrections, oversees institutional programming and has staff in the field to monitor aftercare providers and network with parole officers. Sex
Offender Services also includes an Assessment Unit, which contributes to pre-sentence investigations and screens and evaluates inmates who are potentially sexually violent predators.

The institutional program is structured in 2 phases, for an overall duration of 12 to 15 months. Because the institutional program is statutorily mandated, sex offenders cannot be screened from participation.
Inmates are typically placed in MoSOP within 12 to 18 months of their earliest presumptive release date, and progress through the following phases:

Phase I 3 months
A series of psycho-educational group sessions prepare the offender for more intensive treatment by covering the nature and goals of therapy as well as the structure of the program. Participants undergo a clinical interview and psychological testing.

Phase II 9 to 12 months
After placement in appropriate groups by MoSOP staff, participants enter the core therapy component of the program. Groups of 10 to 12 participants focus on personal responsibility, problem solving,
assertiveness/social skills, empathy skills, and relapse prevention. There is a strong emphasis on cognitive re-structuring.

Phase II groups are divided into three tracks to accommodate different verbal skills and personality styles, ranging from verbally deficient inmates who are passive or easily victimized, to inmates with no verbal deficiencies who are overtly aggressive and highly manipulative. (See “Program Structure” under “Program Description” below.)

Prison Sex Offender Population Identification
Missouri identifies incarcerated sex offenders differently from the general population, by current crime only.

Severity scale
The Missouri DOC does not have a severity scale for identified sex offenders.

Population Status
-Current total adult incarcerated population: Approximately 26,000
-Sex offender total: Approximately 3,500
-Percentage of total population identified as sex offenders: 13.5%

The number of sex offenders has increased from 2,268 in 1994 to 2,813 in 1999, an increase of 24%. Although the number increased, sex offenders as a percentage of the total population did not increase.

Prison Sex Offender Treatment Program
Governance Legislation
The Sexual Assault Prevention Act (Chapter 589.040 of the Missouri State Statutes) was passed in 1980. The Act mandates the following:
A program of treatment The Director of the Department of Corrections is required to develop a program of treatment, education, and rehabilitation for all imprisoned offenders serving sentences for sexual assault offenses.

Treatment requirement
All persons imprisoned by the Department of Corrections for sexual assault are required to successfully complete the treatment program to be considered for early release.

State Center for the Prevention and Control of Sexual Assault
The Director of the Department of Public Safety is required to establish the Center, to carry out:
1) A continuing study of sexual assault, including investigation of:
a) The effectiveness of existing state and local laws.
b) Any relationship between traditional legal and social attitudes toward sexual roles, the act of sexual assault, and the formulation of laws dealing with sexual assault.
c) The treatment of victims of sexual assault by law enforcement agencies, hospitals and other medical institutions, prosecutors, and the courts.
d) The causes of sexual assault.
e) The impact on the victim and the family of the victim.
f) Sexual assault in correctional institutions.
g) The actual incidence compared to the reported incidence and the reasons for any difference.
h) The effectiveness of existing programs designed to prevent and control sexual assault.
2) Assistance to qualified public and not for profit private entities for conducting research and demonstration projects.
3) An annual report of studies and demonstration projects, with appropriate recommendations, to submit to the governor, the chief justice of the supreme court, and the members of the general assembly.
4) Compilation and publication of training materials for sexual assault program personnel.
5) An information system regarding the prevention and control of sexual assault, the treatment and counseling of victims and their families, and the rehabilitation and medical treatment of offenders.
6) Publicizing of state and local programs for assisting victims.

Public school programs
The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is required to develop guidelines for teaching sexual assault prevention and counseling techniques for use by local school districts in establishing prevention education programs. Local boards of education are given discretion.

State Standards/Advisory Board
State-mandated identification policy
For the purpose of requiring sex offender treatment for incarcerated sex offenders, the definition of “sexual assault” is delineated in Chapter 589 (589.015) of the state statutes, as part of the Sexual Assault Prevention Act.

Advisory board/sex offender treatment entity
There is no state-mandated policy that creates an advisory board, and no state-mandated policy that creates a sex offender treatment board/entity that sets standards and requirements for treatment. Standards of Practice use ATSA guidelines.

Stakeholders influencing the program
Stakeholders outside the DOC who influence the program include:
· The legislature
· The Governor’s office

Program Policies

Treatment requirement
All offenders who are identified as sex offenders and assessed for sex offender treatment are required to go to treatment.

Results of denial or refusal of treatment
If an offender denies a sex offending problem or refuses treatment, the offender:
· Has his conditional release date removed
· Serves his maximum sentence
· May be referred for civil commitment

The DOC has written policies for refusal of treatment.

Implications for identified sex offenders
In addition to being classified for treatment, an offender identified as a sex offender under department policy is:
· Restricted to certain security level facilities
· Excluded from outside work crews
· Expected to participate in sex offender treatment

Visitation policy
The visitation policy for sex offenders at the SOTP facility prohibits those with victims under 18 from having child visitors, and prohibits visits with victims even if they are related to the offender. In the near future, all offenders not completing SOTP will be non-contact visits.

Program Description/Placement
State statute requires all offenders convicted of a sexual offense to complete a program of sexual offender treatment prior to being considered for early release. Procedures set forth in the department manual are designed to ensure consistent identification, evaluation, and treatment, in order to facilitate opportunities for sexual offenders to 1) understand how their own perceptions and decision making processes have led to their sexual offenses, 2) take responsibility for their past behavior and their need to change, and 3) learn alternative coping skills and behaviors that will lead to the prevention of inappropriate sexual behavior upon release.

This approach is based on the theoretical concepts and therapeutic techniques of responsibility therapy, adapted from Yochelson and Samenow. To emphasize personal responsibility, the program also places
stringent conduct and participation requirements on all MoSOP participants.

Cognitive behavioral-based treatment is conducted in a group format that uses both psycho-educational and intensive treatment techniques, with an emphasis on relapse prevention. A therapeutic community is in
preparation.

Dedicated facility
MoSOP does not have a dedicated facility. Treatment for men is provided at Farmington Correctional Center, and treatment for women is provided at Women’s Eastern Reception and Diagnostic Correctional Center in Vandalia. A section at Missouri Eastern Correctional Center in Pacific, Missouri addresses offenders with handicaps.

Assessment or testing tools
Assessment tools used for inmate placement into the treatment program include:
· ABEL Screen
· Hare PCL-SV
· WRAT 3 (to determine low-functioning offenders)
· Shipley and medical evaluations done at Reception/Diagnostic Center

Types of offenders
The program is designed to accept the following types of offenders:
· Normal intellectual and socially functioning offenders
· Females
· Developmentally disabled
· Handicapped and/or emotionally impaired

Intake
The MoSOP takes sex offenders into the program according to the following criteria:
· The priority on the list
· Short time to supervised release
· Short time to sentence discharge

Theoretically, all sex offenders not within 12 to 18 months of release are on the program waiting list.

Core curriculum
The curriculum for the treatment program includes:
· Educational courses
· Cognitive behavior therapy
· Group counseling
· Daily phenomenological reports

Program structure
Missouri Sex Offender Services, part of the Missouri Department of Corrections, oversees MoSOP, which is for the prison population only. (See “Post-release” below for Missouri Sex Offender Services involvement in aftercare.) The program is designed only for sex offenders who are willing to participate in treatment. Participants do not necessarily have to be amenable to treatment.

Because treatment is statutorily mandated, sex offenders cannot be screened from participation. Regardless of verbal intellectual abilities, motivation for treatment, mental health issues or physical limitations, all incarcerated sexual offenders must be offered treatment. Participants are required to successfully complete Phase I to be considered for Phase II, and must successfully complete Phase II to be considered for early release.

Phase I 3 Months
Phase I consists of a series of psycho-educational group sessions that provide an orientation to the concepts, requirements, and structure of the more intensive treatment in Phase II. Sessions are conducted by corrections caseworkers and therapists who are trained in the principles and requirements of the program. Homework is assigned to ensure that participants possess the basics necessary for moving into core treatment.
During this phase, participants undergo psychological testing consisting of the instruments mentioned previously. Following completion of Phase I, a Phase II therapist and a caseworker conduct a team interview of each participant. Based on psychological assessments, materials gathered prior to the interview and the interview itself, MoSOP staff determine the appropriate Phase II group placement.

The offender begins Phase II treatment in the assigned group within one month. In addition to providing information for evaluation and treatment planning for individual offenders, the clinical interview and psychological tests generate data for program development and research.

Phase II 9 to 12 months
Phase II provides the core therapy component of the program, focusing on the individual. Phase II therapists possess a minimum of a master’s degree and are trained in the treatment of sex offenders. They are licensed or license-eligible, under supervision for licensure. The Clinical Supervisor provides oversight.

Groups are divided into three tracks to accommodate different personality styles:
Plan A groups are designed to treat offenders who have verbal intellectual deficiencies, serious mental illnesses, or are passive or easily victimized.

Plan B groups are designed for individuals who possess no verbal intellectual deficiencies and use rationalization or intellectualization to minimize their offense. These offenders are passively aggressive rather than overtly physically aggressive.

Plan C groups are designed for individuals who possess no verbal intellectual deficiencies and who blame others for their offense. They are often overtly aggressive and highly manipulative. These individuals usually possess lengthy criminal histories and are high in the constructs of
psychopathy, showing no empathy or remorse for their victims.

Ideally, Phase II groups are composed of 10 to 12 members. As space becomes available in a group, new members are added. This allows for more advanced group members to demonstrate their understanding and insights to new group members.

Phase II treatment includes the following components:
Problem solving focuses on the basic steps of interpersonal problem-solving and how to apply these.

Assertiveness training involves learning to engage in more assertive communication, but also focuses on developing social skills.

Empathy development requires participants to demonstrate an increased ability to empathize, in the form of a victim empathy report.

Relapse prevention culminates in each participant developing a chart of his/her deviant cycle and formulating a relapse prevention plan.

During the 9 to 12 months of Phase II, offenders must participate in a minimum number of hours per week. Most offenders are involved in the program for 12 months.

Assessment Unit
In addition to institutional programming and aftercare oversight (see “Post-release” below), Missouri Sex Offender Services administers an Assessment Unit, which provides the following services:

Pre-sentence investigations
As an adjunct to pre-sentence investigations, the Assessment Unit conducts a 120-day intensive evaluation of offenders sent by the court. This assessment assists judges in placing offenders on probation or into incarceration.

Sexually violent predator processing
The Assessment Unit screens all offenders who do not successfully complete MoSOP for their potential as “Sexually Violent Predators,” as defined by statute. If the screening appears to be positive, the
Assessment Unit conducts an “End of Confinement” evaluation to determine whether the offender may appear to meet the requirements of a “Potentially Sexually Violent Predator,” to be referred for a complete forensic evaluation.

Post-release
If an individual who has successfully completed MoSOP is paroled, the Board of Probation and Parole may require the offender, as a condition of parole, to participate in sexual offender treatment or relapse prevention group in the community. Contracted community providers, who design the aftercare component, conduct post-release aftercare. Missouri Sex Offender Services have staff in the field to monitor providers and network with parole officers. Sex offenders are eligible for community corrections or work release programs only after successful completion of the treatment program. Community Corrections Sex Offender Area Treatment Coordinators are under Missouri Sex Offender Services.

Completion/Failure
It is possible for an offender to complete all phases of sex offender treatment. 30% to 35% of placements successfully complete the treatment program. Phase II has the greatest failure rate, a rate of 65%
to 70%. Phase I helps to officially segregate those offenders who refuse treatment.

Reasons for expulsion
An offender might be expelled from the program for any of the following reasons:
· Failure to progress
· Assaultive behaviors
· Sexual misconduct
· Most major conduct violations

Consequences of failure
As a consequence for failing the program, the inmate participant is subject to loss of time toward reducing his sentence.

Staff Roles and Authority

Assessment for identification and treatment plan
Offenders are assessed for identification and treatment planning by sex offender program staff at the facility.

Authority
Program staff can make a discretionary change to treatment. The state has identified security levels for prison facilities. The unit responsible for placement cannot place a sex offender in Levels 1 through 3; only Level 4 (medium-maximum security) and Level 5 (maximum security) are permissible.

The unit responsible for facility placement and the program staff interact when placing sex offenders at certain facilities.

Assessment

Tests and assessment tools
To measure progress in the program, the MoSOP uses clinical interviews. Outcome measures are currently under study. Program-developed tools for measuring offender progress The program has not developed its own set of tools for measuring offender progress. This is also under study.
Internal system for tracking program effectiveness The program does not have an internal system for tracking program effectiveness.

Release Authority

Parole Board
The parole board is not reluctant to release sex offenders deemed low risk to re-offend.

Rate of release
Most sex offenders do not discharge their sentence in prison prior to release. Release rates are delineated below.
Sentence discharge: 32%
Parole: 18%
Conditional (mandatory) release: 23%
Probation: 19%
Other/death: 8%

Staffing Issues
A total of 8 staff provides treatment in two facilities, one for men and one for women. All are state employees. The department has the discretion to set the starting salary for all program staff, trying to adhere to local standards.

Training, licensing, and certification requirements
Treatment staff must be licensed or license-eligible LCSW’s or LPC’s.
Phase II therapists possess a minimum of a master’s degree and are trained in the treatment of sex offenders.

Staffing of treatment groups
Groups of 10 to 12 participants are facilitated by 1 counselor.

Recruitment and retention
The program has had difficulty recruiting doctoral level psychologists for rural area facilities. However, the program has had no recent staff turnover problems.

Program Costs
Total overall DOC budget: Approximately $500,000,000
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Old 07-28-2012, 11:33 PM
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Question Soau help

I need help. I will be sentenced sometime in late October or early November this year, and my lawyer thinks I have a great chance at getting the SOAU in my sentance. I don't know anything about it, but he says it's the best thing we can hope for. PLEASE if you have any information about this program let me know! Anything as far as how long it takes to actually start the program, what the actual assessment is like, chances of getting a favorable review, etc. I'm so nervous and scared, please any information would be extremely appreciated.
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:07 AM
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Purpose of SOAU

Risk Assessment to determine if offender can safely be
managed in the community.

Recommendations for community supervision and treatment
if probation is granted.Primary location is at Farmington Correctional Center (FCC)

276 Beds for treatment.

Therapeutic Community—4 wings of 60 beds, 1 wing of 36
beds

Phase I—Assessment and Introduction to Treatment
(approximately 12 weeks)

Phase II—Active Treatment (9-12 month
s)

Offenders may be terminated from treatment due to lack of
progress, poor conduct, failure to accept responsibility, etc.

Our goal, though, is to treat every offender possible to
minimize future risk to the public and to help the offender
become a productive member of society.

Successful completion may allow an offender to be released
from prison on conditional release or parole.

Most offenders released prior to completing full sentence
will continue in treatment in the community

Wish I could be more helpful. Good Luck.

Last edited by Hardt; 07-29-2012 at 12:10 AM.. Reason: Color
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Old 07-29-2012, 09:54 PM
AuburnWE AuburnWE is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardt View Post
Purpose of SOAU

Risk Assessment to determine if offender can safely be
managed in the community.

Recommendations for community supervision and treatment
if probation is granted.Primary location is at Farmington Correctional Center (FCC)

276 Beds for treatment.

Therapeutic Community—4 wings of 60 beds, 1 wing of 36
beds

Phase I—Assessment and Introduction to Treatment
(approximately 12 weeks)

Phase II—Active Treatment (9-12 month
s)

Offenders may be terminated from treatment due to lack of
progress, poor conduct, failure to accept responsibility, etc.

Our goal, though, is to treat every offender possible to
minimize future risk to the public and to help the offender
become a productive member of society.

Successful completion may allow an offender to be released
from prison on conditional release or parole.

Most offenders released prior to completing full sentence
will continue in treatment in the community

Wish I could be more helpful. Good Luck.
Thank you for your help, any other info is much appreciated!!
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