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  #1  
Old 10-22-2005, 05:10 AM
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Default Books written by and for First Nations People

read any good ones lately? or in the past?

what have you sent to your loved one inside???

Heard about a good book?? need to know if its hokey or real???

Post it here....
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Old 10-22-2005, 05:12 AM
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Default Prison Writings, My Life is My Sun Dance, Leonard Peltier

Prison Writings, My Life is My Sun Dancer LPeltier


Prison Writings, My Life is My Sun Dance


by Leonard Peltier, United States prisoner #89637-132.


Edited by Harvey Arden With a Forward by Chief Arvol Looking Horse.


American Indian Review
Issue Number 22 Autumn/Fall 1999

For 24 years Leonard Peltier has been incarcerated by a society and system that flouts the concept of justice. More proof of Peltier’s innocence has been documented than any evidence
of guilt. As he says, “I am guilty only of being an Indian. That’s why I’m here. Being who I am, that’s Aboriginal sin.” He could be bitter and wracked with a need for vengeance. But he isn’t.

In Prison Writings, My Life is My Sun Dance, Leonard Peltier speaks about his life, his time in jail and the experience of being an American Indian activist at the close of the 20th century. He doesn’t speak with hatred and vitriol, rather with sadness and agony for his people, and with unquenchable hope. His journey of suffering, his trail of tears, has brought him a deeper understanding of himself and humanity. It is left to the reader to rage with frustration at the iniquities inflicted on Peltier, and on all First Americans.
In Prison Writings Peltier relates the events that led to his arrest, his extradition from Canada and the subsequent trials and appeals from an emotional and spiritual perspective. He explains how his story is inextricably entwined with the tragic history of American Indians. He describes growing up surrounded by poverty and prejudice, and learning that “The so called American Dream isn’t for you. For you that dream’s a nightmare.” He gives us a glimpse of what it means to survive as an Indian, of how he grew up believing that being Indian was something to be ashamed of. Until he was about 14 when he heard a proud Ojibwa lady ask angrily, “Where are our warriors? Why don’t they stand up and fight for their starving people?”. He vowed then and there to become a warrior and fight to help his people. This pledge led to his involvement with AIM, and ultimately to his presence at Oglala in 1975
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  #3  
Old 10-22-2005, 05:24 AM
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Default The Red Road to Wellbriety: In the Native American Way

The Red Road to Wellbriety

Just one of the books I ordered for myself and for the Nattive Cirlces in the prison suystem with whom I work...



http://www.whitebison.org/store/images/book_redroad.jpg


This is one heckuva good book, for anyone, but if I had to send one book to my loved one, this would be it and I already have...We are reading it together, and I have sent it to quite a few others. When i set up a table at pow wows, I always have a couple copies with me to gift or give away...

Its not just for people in recovery, i don't think...it helps to put Native People in touch with their most basic traditions in a way thats easy to put to work in these times, when family and community seem to be the last thing on the list of priorities...

The Red Road to Wellbriety: In the Native American Way is an addictions recovery book written especially for Native Americans by Native Americans. Sometimes called, “The Indian Big Book” by Native Americans who are using it in their own recovery programs, this book presents a 12 Step approach taking place in a Native American cultural format. Since publication in 2002, The Red Road to Wellbriety has been placed in the hands of over 12,000 Native and non Native people alike. This book is especially useful for incarcerated Native Americans who don’t find addictions recovery help within their own cultural framework in prison. Giving the gift of this book to a man or woman in prison can help save and renew a life.



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  #4  
Old 10-22-2005, 05:28 AM
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Default Meditations with Native American Elders

Meditations with Native American Elders

another book published by www.whitebison.org

A book I purchased for myself and the Circles. Its really good...Gives an elders meditation for each day of the year and each season inside the medicine wheel.

My hunny loves...He leads the circle and this book has become so important to their daily teachings...It helps to give a really good focus on the why;s of the path they have chosen
Meditations with Native American Elders is a fourbook set, one book per season, offering a quote per day by Native speakers. Each quotation is followed by a reflection by Don Coyhis. The four meditation books are also highly participatory. On each page a bit of open space is left for the reader to write down his or her own intention for the day. Each page of the meditation books also includes a short prayer by the author and a place to draw in tonight’s moon, keeping the reader aware of the monthly cycle.

CYCLE OF LEARNING AND GROWTH
Spring - This is the time of planting new ideas and implementing goals and visions. In the spring the oak tree experiences new life; sap starts flowing in its veins. Soon after, the oak tree starts to grow buds. So it is with human beings. When we start to experience growth, we start to bud. Our mind gets new thoughts about our ability, and we develop new ideas, new attitudes and new thoughts about making changes. The world and our environment really feels fresh.

Summer - During this season the buds on the oak tree mature and grow and the tree takes its shape. When the leaves grow to their fullness the oak tree can take an identity. It now knows who it is, why it is and where it is going. The summer season of the human being is experienced by the feeling that our lives are taking on an order. Order is in our lives, relationships, jobs, careers and values. We are comfortable with ourselves and our surroundings. Oh, life is great.

Fall - In the fall, just when the oak tree believes that it can’t get any better, its leaves turn color, and the acorns are harvested as the oak tree experiences the rewards of the spring planting. This season of the human being is comparably as great. Everything in life is blessed and our prayer is, Creator, please keep it this way forever.

Winter - During the winter season, the oak tree experiences the loss of its leaves. At first the oak tree is not concerned but soon the tree looks around and says, “Wait a minute. Something is wrong with me.” Then, as the oak tree observes its surroundings, it realizes it has lost its identity. We will also experience a type of loss. The human will seek the answer to three questions during the winter time: who am I, why am I and where am I going? The winter season is the season of reflecting and renewal. We humans must be willing to let go of our old leaves — meaning our current identity, our skills, our attitudes, habits and our beliefs. This letting go is nature’s way of preparing us for our new spring.
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  #5  
Old 10-22-2005, 05:31 AM
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books by BlackWolf and Gina Jones

sharing my thoughts in red

Listen to the Drum:Blackwolf Shares His Medicine
Blackwolf Jones, M.S., Gina Jones


"I invite you to stop...and listen." So begins this exploration of authentic ancient teachings brought into a modern context with sensitivity and insight. The author, a psychotherapist of Ojibway heritage, unlocks the secrets of balance and harmony with thoughtful observations and suggestions about how to reintroduce the sacred into our busy, sometimes frantic, lives. Strong medicine for the spirit and the soul.

I liked this book real well...I thnk especially in a prison setting, where so much of what is traditional is not available, this book enables you to make your own personal rituals...I have found that in creating my oun ceremonies, often times they are very similar if not identical to Traditional ceremonies, perhhaps because of my teachings and/or blood memory
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
As a respected Ojibway Elder, insightful author, and sought after licensed psychotherapist Blackwolf (Robert Jones M.S.) brings an electrifying healing presence to workshops, seminars, and gatherings.Blackwolf has blended ancient tribal healing remedies with contemporary approaches to profoundly redirect societal inequities and defuse cultural abuse. These effective teachings promote healthy balance through unique humor, storytelling, and candid observations. Consequently, participants are moved to review and redefine their present value system responses towards self and others.This presenter is a necessary guest because his native spiritual wisdom speaks clearly on both individual and collective levels. These age old understandings enhance and expand former awarenesses hidden within current societal programming. Participants, thereby, find a strong sense of belonging and feel newfound connections to both the spiritual and physical laws of the universe. Blackwolf has taught Ojibway culture at the University of Wisconsin and has co-authored three books currently distributed in ten countries. The Healing Drum, Listen to the Drum, and Earth Dance Drum can be obtained through most bookstores in North America. Blackwolf is an elder of Ojibway tribal heritage. He grew up on the Lac Corte Oreilles reservation in Northwestern Wisconsin and learned from his elders, ancient tribal ways and Wisdom.After serving in the Korean conflict, and attending pre-law school at Marquette University, Blackwolf fell victim to alcoholism for twenty years. Since 1977 he has enjoyed continuous sobriety and went on to become a licensed psychotherapist specializing in addictionolgy. What he has brought to the clinical arena is old age tribal healing remedies coupled with contemporary approaches.Blackwolf is an international speaker and workshop presenter. He has also taught Ojibway culture at the University of Wisconsin. Blackwolf now resides in Greenbay, Wisconsin. Gina Jones, coauthor of Sacred Self, Sacred Relationships is a grandmother, mother, wife, teacher, writer, and artist. Gina currently teaches middle school language arts and social studies in Green Bay, Wisconsin. She holds a bachelor’s degree in education and a master’s degree focusing on the Creative Arts in Learning. Gina is of mixed heritage, including European and Mohawk ancestry.Beginning in 1996, Gina has facilitated gatherings for women focusing on personal development and celebration. Connecting with her Indian ancestry, Gina is an annual presenter at Abinooji-aki’s Celebration of Women on the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Reservation in northwestern Wisconsin, and has presented at The American Club in Koller, Wisconsin and Cambridge University in England. Coauthor of The Healing Blanket, Listen to the Drum, The Healing Drum, and Earth Dance Drum, Gina has joined respected Ojibwa teachers, including her husband Blackwolf, to communicate traditional healing and hope to a world in need. Gina loves to teach. She has received the 1998 Wisconsin Kohl Fellowship Award for Educators, nominated for Whose Who Among America’s Teachers, developed an extensive curriculum unit for CESA 6, and presented Writing Workshops for educators in the state of Wisconsin. Future plans include publication of young adult literature and additional resources for educators. As an artist, Gina enjoys drawing, music, drama, storytelling, and writing. Her poetry has been featured in the anthology Unsilenced: The Spirit of Women and her writing includes both fiction and non-fiction. She continues to sing at occasional weddings and plays guitar. She has directed middle school musicals and integrates all the arts into her teaching and writing.Gina’s hope is to leave a legacy of love, both through her creative endeavors and in her personal relationships with family and friends.

Learn to listen at the deepest level... to yourself, your world, and to the
silence. Learn to walk in balance and harmony.


Sacred Self, Sacred Relationships: Healing the World for Seven Generations


The ripple effect of hope and healing-which begins within each of us-extends outward through our relationships with the power to transform the world. This is the vision and promise of Blackwolf and Gina Jones in their latest book, Sacred Self, Sacred Relationships.

Drawing upon Native American teachings as well as well as their professional work in the fields of health and spirituality, the authors explore how global change begins with personal change. Through our loving commitment to improve ourselves and heal our relationships, we become engaged in the process of changing the world for the better-today and tomorrow.

Again, incorporates basic teachings of the Medicine wheel to personal healing and as all things Native sharing the healing

Listen to the Drum:Blackwolf Shares His Medicine
Blackwolf Jones, M.S., Gina Jones


"I invite you to stop...and listen." So begins this exploration of authentic ancient teachings brought into a modern context with sensitivity and insight. The author, a psychotherapist of Ojibway heritage, unlocks the secrets of balance and harmony with thoughtful observations and suggestions about how to reintroduce the sacred into our busy, sometimes frantic, lives. Strong medicine for the spirit and the soul.

suggestions on living in 2 worlds successfully



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  #6  
Old 10-22-2005, 11:23 AM
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Anyone read Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn? My book club is reading it for December.

I have read Prison Writings but was reluctant to send it to my penpals. I cried through most of it. I would recommend reading Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

I read a lot of Native American literature. I'll post more later. Thanks for this thread.

I just pulled off the Amazon site books by Carlos Castenada due to a request by my youngest penpal. Anybody read anything by him?
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Old 10-28-2005, 05:04 PM
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Default Books to avoid (regarding history and the Culture of American Indians

Books to avoid (regarding history and the Culture of American Indians
http://www.oyate.org/resources.html
We do not recommend these books. To read a critical review that supports our position, click on the links below. These are not all of the books that we do not recommend; they are just some of the worst. For books we do recommend, please view our catalog.
Lynne Reid Banks,
The Indian in the Cupboard. Illustrated by Brock Cole. New York: Avon (1980)
The Return of the Indian. Illustrated by William Geldart. New York: Doubleday (1986)

Michael L. Cooper, Indian School: Teaching the White Man's Way. New York: Clarion (1999)

Alice Dalgliesh, The Courage of Sarah Noble. Illustrated by Leonard Weisgard. New York: Macmillan (1954, 1991)

Walter D. Edmonds, The Matchlock Gun. Illustrated by Paul Lantz. New York: Dodd, Mead (1941), G.P. Putnam (1989), Penguin Putnam (1998)

Susan Jeffers, Brother Eagle, Sister Sky, Illustrated by the author. New York: Dial (1991).

Albert Marrin, Sitting Bull and His World. New York: Dutton (2000)
Also see the accompanying essay, Turning a Battle Into a Massacre

Bebe Faas Rice, The Place at the Edge of the Earth, New York: Clarion (2002)

Ann Rinaldi, My Heart Is On the Ground: The Diary of Nannie Little Rose, a Sioux Girl. Carlisle Indian School, Pennsylvania, 1880. New York: Scholastic (1999), Dear America Series
Also see the accompanying essay, “Literary License” or “Mutated Plagiarism”?

Marc Simmons, Millie Cooper’s Ride: A True Story from History. Illustrated by Ronald Kil. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press (2002)

Elizabeth George Speare, The Sign of the Beaver. New York: Dell (1983)

Ann Turner, The Girl Who Chased Away Sorrow: The Diary of Sarah Nita, a Navajo Girl. New Mexico, 1864. New York: Scholastic (1999), Dear America Series

Neil Waldman, Wounded Knee. New York: Atheneum (2001)
Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House on the Prairie. Illustrated by Garth Williams. New York: HarperCollins (1935, 1953, 1981).
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Old 10-31-2005, 07:17 PM
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My husband has read all of James Welch. He and I especially liked Fool's Crow. We also liked Sherman Alexie's Indian Killer a lot. (Alexie is the one who wrote the film Smoke Signals). Eduardo Galeano's The Upside Down World is great, and, of course, everyone should read A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn.
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Old 11-01-2005, 05:55 AM
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Thanks for sharing your thoughts and opinions...the only one I havent read is A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinnm which is now at the top of my list...I was needing a great book to read!!!
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Old 11-01-2005, 08:07 AM
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Default Invisible Indians:

Invisible Indians: Mixed-Blood Native Americans Who Are Not Enrolled in Federally Recognized Tribes
by David Arv Bragi
Description: Due to a lack of proper documentation, low blood quantum, tribal politics or other reasons, hundreds of thousands of Americans of indigenous descent are unable to join a federally recognized tribe.

Instead, they exist in a kind of legal and ethnic limbo, living as multiracial individuals and families in a country that does not fully acknowledge their multiracial heritage.

Living outside of the system, they walk their own unique roads to preserve, reclaim and celebrate their heritage. Some lead extraordinary lives as traditional artisans, pow wow dancers, educators, activists or community elders.

Others choose to honor their heritage privately, observing family traditions, reclaiming lost knowledge, or just remembering in solitude those who came before them. Invisible Indians explores the oral histories, personal experiences and opinions of this remarkable, yet largely misunderstood, segment of Native American society.

David Arv Bragi is a freelance journalist who has published articles and columns on health, technology, cultural, political and business topics for SF Gate, San Jose/Silicon Valley Business Journal, Portable Computing Magazine and Strong Medicine. He is a former news editor at Grassroots.com and edits the multicultural webzine New Tribal Dawn. A mixed-blood Muscogee/Seminole, he is enrolled in the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma.
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Old 12-22-2005, 10:25 PM
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How about PowWow Highway by David Seals? It is great! And very funny. We both loved it.
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Old 12-26-2005, 05:12 AM
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I sent a couple of my husbands friends a series of books published published by white bison...its not too cheap, but for the amount of use it gets, its priceless... I sent the set to my husband last year and he loves it, uses it daily and shares the teachings found inside with the circle...order it here.... http://www.whitebison.org/store/prod...?cPath=1&pId=3
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Old 12-26-2005, 10:38 AM
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I tried to order that this year for my penpals and they were sold out. Hope they get it in soon.

I have sent a couple of my pals the Wellbriety book and they have benefited from it even though they weren't in a White Bison program.

Powwow Highway: that was a great movie too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingy
I sent a couple of my husbands friends a series of books published published by white bison...its not too cheap, but for the amount of use it gets, its priceless... I sent the set to my husband last year and he loves it, uses it daily and shares the teachings found inside with the circle...order it here.... http://www.whitebison.org/store/prod...?cPath=1&pId=3
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Old 01-02-2006, 02:42 AM
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Karen, I have been trying to order more too...I have to remember to call WB and find out when they will have more...I will keep you posted!!!
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  #15  
Old 01-03-2006, 06:55 AM
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Default suggested reading From the desk of Harvey Arden

From the desk of Harvey Arden

Founder: ~The Wisdomkeepers Collective ~ "Bringing the Elders to the World & the World to the Elders"

Author: WISDOMKEEPERS: Meetings with Native American Spiritual
Elders

DREAMKEEPERS: A Spirit-Journey into Aboriginal Australia

NOBLE RED MAN: Lakota Wisdomkeeper Mathew King

TRAVELS IN A STONE CANOE: The Return to the Wisdomkeepers

~HAVE YOU THOUGHT of LEONARD PELTIER LATELY?~

Editor: PRISON WRITINGS: MY LIFE IS MY SUN DANCE by Leonard Peltier

WHITE BUFFALO TEACHINGS by Chief Arvol Looking Horse

~*~ A Book Project of the Heart: Voice of the Hawk Elder ~*~

Edna Gordon with Harvey Arden

THIS WONDERFUL WISDOMKEEPER is Seneca Hawk Elder EDNA GORDON of the
Cattaraugus Rez in upstate NY, south of Buffalo. It's been my great
blessing to know this wondrous human being for some years now. Edna
is 84, a true warrior against Injustice of every kind. She has sent
me the manuscripts of Ten Books of really powerful Poetry she has
written. "I've got things to tell the world," she tells
me. "Important things." She's asked me to pare it all down as an
editor and create ONE BOOK that could be printed and sent out while
she still walks this Mother Earth with us.

Here's a sample of Edna's luminous words:

[Delivered for Edna by Sharmagne Leland-St.John of the Confederated
Colville Tribe of Nespelem, Washington]
~~~~~~~*~~~~~~~
A Message to the Runners
on World Peace and Prayer Day 2005
From Seneca Wisdomkeeper
Edna Gordon
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I, Grandma Edna Gordon, Seneca Hawk Clan Elder,
of the Haudenoshaunee Iroquois Six Nations Confederacy,
personally commend and honour
each of you runners
on your Spirit-run.

You have run for all of us.
You have run for each of us.
Your footsteps from the Four Directions
of Mother Earth
Are sacred and bless us all.

You bring the Four Directions here with you
to what Chief Arvol Looking Horse calls "The Center of
Everything That Is"-
the sacred Paha Sapa or Black Hills.

Even as you runners have run the paths
of this Mother Earth
so have you also run the great Sky Pathway of the sun, the wind,
the rain, and the stars.

You have blessed us all
with your sacred footsteps.

Mitakuye Oyasin, as our Lakota relatives say, We are all
related.

Yes, all and each and every one of us.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I'm determined to gather Edna's truly powerful poems & writings
into a very special book entitled Voice of the Hawk Elder, which
will take me a few months into 2006. I'll then have the book
printed, maybe a few hundred, maybe a few thousand, as Edna wants,
and will send out copies to any good person who has donated $20 to
this private (and non-tax-exempt) project of the heart.

To PRE-ORDER the book NOW,
and participate personally in this project of the heart,
please send a check made out to 'Arden
Editorial Services'
for $20 per copy (includes s/h) , with "Hawk Elder Book" on
the 'For' line, to

Arden Editorial Services
4101 Legation St., N.W.
Washington, DC 20015

For more info contact harveyarden@starpower.net

To contact Edna directly: rdgordon@hotmail.com

More about Harvey at www.haveyouthought.com

~Please pass this Message on to a few good friends.~
Thanks! /Harvey


LPNET: Wounded Knee Audio 1973--worth listening to
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 14:22:00 -0500

http://radio.indymedia.org/uploads/wounded_knee.mp3

Aho.
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Old 04-30-2006, 05:33 PM
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Default Good Books To Read......

Here is a list of books that i hav read & would recommend for those who truly want to gain better understanding and teach the truth.

A People's History of the United States(1492-Present) by Howard Zinn
Bringing Back The Spirit(Indian Ways of Wholeness for Churches &
Society in Crisis) by Phillip H.Duran
Columbus In The Americas by William Least Heat-Moon
First Peoples(A Documentary Survey of American Indian History)by Colin G. Calloway
1491:New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus by Charles C. Mann
Lies across America by James W. Loewen
Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. LOEWEN
Talks From The Heart (Vol.1,2,3,) by Robert Francis
The Wounded Knee Massacre(From the viewpoint of the Sioux)by James H. McGregor
Chiefs of Nations:The Cherokee Nations from 1730 to 1839 by Paul Thomas Vickers


Wa-do
Smokies sister Sarah

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Old 06-18-2006, 11:40 AM
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One of my all time favourite books is Grass Dancer by Susan Power. I fell in love with it and eventually met Ms. Power's mother also named Susan. She adopted me. After I met the author I asked for permission to write a screenplay adaptation she was so excited. and said she had prayed for me to come. We now have the preeminent Native American director attached, a producer, and we are on our way to making a film of it.

The film board of South Dakota is very excited about us coming there to film this wonderful story of a love stronger than death.

It is a must read!
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Old 06-18-2006, 01:31 PM
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that is absolutely wonderful news! congratulations on being so talented
Love Valorie
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Old 06-19-2006, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by valorie1
that is absolutely wonderful news! congratulations on being so talented
Love Valorie

Thank you Valorie for your reply!

I have always believed our talents are a gift from Great Spirit what we do with them is our gift back to him.

I am doing the best I know how. And I am grateful for all the help I am receiving from friends and colleagues who also believe in this project.
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Old 04-11-2007, 07:38 AM
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Last year I read Black Elk Speaks by John G. Neihardt and I found it very impressive. I'm currently reading The Sixth Grandfather: Black Elk's Teachings Given to John G. Neihardt by Raymond J. Demallie, which gives more background information.

To be honest I have no idea if these books are any good because I don't know much about the Native American culture - I'm reading to learn. But these titles haven't been mentioned here so I felt like adding them to the list.

This thread is great for finding more informative books to read, thanks for starting it
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Old 04-11-2007, 06:37 PM
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A penf-riend of mine sent me a card with his letter today to mail in for a free catalog of the INNER TRADITIONS/BEAR & COMPANY offings.

I had forgotten about that book company. I have several good titles on/by Native Americans from Bear & CO. from back in the 1980s-90s before they merged with Inner Traditions, so being the 'curious type' I pulled up their website.

You have to really wade through the gobblity-gook and New Ager junk..but if you'll go to the "Shamanic Studies/North American" thread you'll find a score of new books that sound like they'd really be good reads. Worth checking out!

[I did notice they're still offering one of my all-time faves, "Gift of Power" by Archie Fire Lame Deer & Richard Erdoes. It's a great -and realistic- read on what it takes to become a "real" Medicine Man/ Pipe-Carrier.
The one by Archie Fire Lame Deer's father John Fire Lame Deer (Crying for a Dream) also co-written by Richard Erdoes- is still available too!

Anyway, check out their website for some possibilities of good Native books for yourselve or your loved ones behind the Iron Walls.

www.innertraditions.com
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Old 04-11-2007, 07:09 PM
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We both recently read and loved Sherman Alexie's Reservation Blues. I also really liked PermaRed...I forget the author's name. It is written by a women, really good. And all of Louise Erdrich's books are wonderful.

Happy reading!
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Old 04-12-2007, 11:53 AM
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First of all, I just want to state that this is my opinion...my opinion and two dollars will get you a cup of coffee...remember when it was only a quarter????

I checked out the website and although quite a few of the books are written by native people, a good many of them are written by scientists, archeologists. They may have a clue about what they are talking about , but in my opinion one has to be raised with the knowledge of their people to fully understand the traditions, and rituals. One great Abenaki man said "You cannot know the people without knowing the language" Perhaps these men DO know the language...I tend to doubt it for the most part.

The other thing that bothers me is that some of these people are the same people that have and still are robbing the graves of ancestors, for their science and gawd knows what else. I don't care who you are or what science needs, stay away from the ancestors graves. Jeez, still millions of native people remain in a state of unrest, and families despair not knowing that it may be their relatives in that cardboard box in the cellar of that library, even worse, being passed around by students wishing to learn, I don't know what.

And then there are the native people, not all of them, but the ones that share whats sacred for money...I like to know what the native authors, who tell about traditions and sing sacred songs for recording are doing with their money...are they sharing whats made on the traditions of the community, or are they hoarding it away for themselves. I can tell you right now that the community at large, at least noe that I know of would want their ceremonies and songs published...times are hard though, in some dire cases it could happen, thats how competition dancing began...

So, there you have it...I am really just saying research your authors before you feed the greedy ones...better yet...instead of killing a tree go sit with an elder...do some gardening, bring them dinner, take them some place, or jjust sit and keep them company, they have lots to say and share if you are listening. You know, there are those in Prison with nothing to do but talk...The elders hold the keys to the future.

climbing off my soap box..oh wait!! one more thing...I did not grow up on the reservation, or in an Indian community, my mother p0assed on what she could, and then I went looking for more, starting with volunteering at pow wows...just as I share here...and no, I don't know everything...but I am always looking and working to learn more...

Quote:
Originally Posted by whitewolf2751
A penf-riend of mine sent me a card with his letter today to mail in for a free catalog of the INNER TRADITIONS/BEAR & COMPANY offings.

I had forgotten about that book company. I have several good titles on/by Native Americans from Bear & CO. from back in the 1980s-90s before they merged with Inner Traditions, so being the 'curious type' I pulled up their website.

You have to really wade through the gobblity-gook and New Ager junk..but if you'll go to the "Shamanic Studies/North American" thread you'll find a score of new books that sound like they'd really be good reads. Worth checking out!

[I did notice they're still offering one of my all-time faves, "Gift of Power" by Archie Fire Lame Deer & Richard Erdoes. It's a great -and realistic- read on what it takes to become a "real" Medicine Man/ Pipe-Carrier.
The one by Archie Fire Lame Deer's father John Fire Lame Deer (Crying for a Dream) also co-written by Richard Erdoes- is still available too!

Anyway, check out their website for some possibilities of good Native books for yourselve or your loved ones behind the Iron Walls.

www.innertraditions.com
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(til the next time)

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Last edited by Wingy; 04-12-2007 at 11:54 AM..
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Old 05-11-2007, 08:48 AM
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What about the book, "God is Red" written by Vine Deloria? Anyone read it? I was thinking about this this morning and I think I will go to the library and see if they have it.

I am at this point in my life where I am dealing with spiritual matters. I cannot help, but notice the correlation of my people's creation stories and BC biblical times.

I'm just curious to find out if anyone read Vine's book.
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Old 05-14-2007, 09:27 AM
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Vine Deloria has written some absolutely GENIUS books!!! Anyone who is interested in the inner workings of community, traditions and the damage done to the First People will find it in Mr. Deloria's writing, which are extensive.

the native people will surely and sorely miss Mr. Deloria who had been an eloquent, and often highly provocative spokesperson for Indian identity and social change throughout his life, as a scholar, speaker and a writer

Among his other books, all of which are worthwhile reads are:
Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto.
We Talk, You Listen (1970),
Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties: An Indian Declaration of Independence (1974),
and a variety of works on history, theology, and contemporary Indian life.
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