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California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility, Corcoran (SATF) Topic and discussion specific to CSATF- Substance Abuse Treatment Facility located at Corcoran State Prison in California.

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Old 05-21-2005, 09:49 AM
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Hi everyone,
Is anybody involved with or writing any inmates at Corcoran SHU?? I have a pen pal there and although he has told me some about the conditions, he is not the type to complain, so I'm wondering what he really deals with on a daily basis.
Does everybody there have a gang affiliation, and if so are all the validations legit? I get the impression they are not, and lots of the guys in the SHU shouldn't be there..... Any insight would be appreciated.
Thank you!
Also-- does anybody know what the SHU prisoners are allowed to recieve in the mail? The rules seem to change, so does anybody know the current rules? thanks!
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Old 05-22-2005, 01:28 AM
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I just got a letter from my guy today, he is in the SHU at Corcoran. He is also not the type to complain, but in today's letter he does mention that they are not fed very well. I wonder if anyone in prison is fed well. So for what you can send, well I send him writing paper (150 sheets) still wrapped in the plastic it comes in at the store, envelopes that are pre-stamped by the post office, pads of drawing paper, and that's about all I send. Oh and I also send a lot of things I print on the computer for him, such as word games, math games/quizzes, any topics he is interested in I look them up online, print it out and send it to him so that he always has something new to read.
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Old 05-22-2005, 10:33 AM
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Thank you for responding!

I recently sent a package of unopened paper just like you, but he only got 15 sheets of it.... I wonder what's up with that?
Just in case you are interested, I called corcoran today and asked about the Access packages, and they told me they could recieve them in the SHU, only once a year... the Access website does list SHU so I'm thinking of sending one. Have you ever tried sending one of those?
Also- do they give him everything you print out from the web? Is there a limit on pages or anything? I recently sent some info on the 3 strike law and it was 14 pages... I don't know if he got it yet or not.
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Old 05-22-2005, 05:43 PM
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I have sent at most 80 pages of things I printed, but in the same big manilla envelope I also include my letter, and envelopes. Sometimes I send all that along with writing paper. He has never questioned what I send, he just lets me know he has recieved the puzzles, reading materials and what ever else it is I send. I have never sent him a package, yet, so I'm not sure as to how those work. I usually send my homemade paper goods packs and money orders, that's about it. I wonder why your friend only got 15 sheets, makes me wonder if my guy gets all his goods. hmmmm
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Old 05-23-2005, 10:41 AM
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He has to be in SHU for a full year b4 he is can get a package. Also, you might want to call the vendor. They should be able to give you any information for SHU packages.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaver
Thank you for responding!


I recently sent a package of unopened paper just like you, but he only got 15 sheets of it.... I wonder what's up with that?
Just in case you are interested, I called corcoran today and asked about the Access packages, and they told me they could recieve them in the SHU, only once a year... the Access website does list SHU so I'm thinking of sending one. Have you ever tried sending one of those?
Also- do they give him everything you print out from the web? Is there a limit on pages or anything? I recently sent some info on the 3 strike law and it was 14 pages... I don't know if he got it yet or not.
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Old 05-23-2005, 10:54 AM
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I know many inmates at Corcoran. I am a prisoners Rights Advocate for Corcoran and will call or write letters to correct the abuse that goes on in this Prison. I will try to answer the best I can all your questions.

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Old 05-23-2005, 11:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaver
I have a pen pal there and although he has told me some about the conditions, he is not the type to complain, so I'm wondering what he really deals with on a daily basis.

I don't want to break your heart but BELIEVE all he tells you! EXAMPLE: CO's told the inmates they are going to receive a HEALTHIER DIET! Guess what they did. The menu didn't change they just gave them LESS FOOD! Most inmates in the SHU lose about 50 lbs.

Does everybody there have a gang affiliation, and if so are all the validations legit? NO AND NO

I get the impression they are not, and lots of the guys in the SHU shouldn't be there. YOU GOT IT!

Also-- does anybody know what the SHU prisoners are allowed to recieve in the mail? Depends, books 3 amonth magazines 2
The rules seem to change, so does anybody know the current rules?
What would you like to send? Then I can answer better!
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Old 05-23-2005, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by valivee
I just got a letter from my guy today, he is in the SHU at Corcoran. He is also not the type to complain, but in today's letter he does mention that they are not fed very well. I wonder if anyone in prison is fed well.
I had to make a big stink about inmates not being fed very well.

There was a Liet. who did not fed the SHU inmates for 5 days. Once someone got word to me about this I made a few phone calls and this was investigated and the LIET. is no longer overseeing the SHU inmates.
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Old 05-23-2005, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaver
I recently sent a package of unopened paper just like you, but he only got 15 sheets of it.... I wonder what's up with that?
Never heard that before. ?

Just in case you are interested, I called corcoran today and asked about the Access packages, and they told me they could recieve them in the SHU, only once a year... the Access website does list SHU so I'm thinking of sending one. Have you ever tried sending one of those?

YES, but only after they have been in the SHU one year! Under Article 43 in the DOM has the new changes here is the PDF file and I recommend that you print it out and send it in to your loved ones:
http://www.isp-ifc.com/DOM_Changes.pdf


Also- do they give him everything you print out from the web? Is there a limit on pages or anything? I recently sent some info on the 3 strike law and it was 14 pages... I don't know if he got it yet or not.

I would think that would be OK, if not, ask them to show you where in Title 15 does it say they can't have it. He can always 602 them if they refuse to give it to him. Or I can call for you.
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Old 05-23-2005, 11:38 AM
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Going Insane in the SHU Box
ALEXANDER COCKBURN
July 15 2001

In an amazing feat of organizing, about 900 prisoners in solitary confinement in the infamous California prisons of Pelican Bay and Corcoran staged a hunger strike in the first week of July.

The hunger strike was in protest of the corrections department's policy to remove and isolate those inmates designated, often capriciously, as prison gang members.

These inmates are separated from the general prison population and kept in Security Housing Units, known as SHU--confined for 22 hours a day in 8-by-10-foot windowless cells. SHU inmates are always shackled when they leave their cells; they exercise in a "yard" that is really a larger concrete cell with no exercise equipment and no view of the outside world. SHU prisoners receive all meals in their cells, are not allowed to participate in training or educational activities, are not allowed contact visits and have no phone access. The severe sensory deprivation of SHU causes some prisoners to go insane.
Given the horrific nature of indeterminate confinement in the SHU, the nature of the evidence of gang activity can be vague, well beyond the point of malevolent absurdity.

The most frequent way to incriminate a prisoner with gang associations is by way of an anonymous informant's fingerpointing. But other criteria the corrections department uses to justify "gang membership" include possession of literature or art construed as gang-related, writing to another prisoner's family, assisting another prisoner with legal work, signing birthday or get well cards to prisoners, exercising or otherwise interacting with another prisoner suspected of gang involvement.

Prisoners are not allowed to present evidence or witnesses in their defense. There is no requirement that the information be current; a parolee returned to prison for a new offense after 10 years on the outside can be thrown in the SHU as a gangster based on information from his previous term in prison.

Confinement in the SHU is for an indeterminate period. Before 1999, the only way for a validated gang member to be released from a SHU was to be paroled, die, go insane or become an informant on other prisoners. Since a rule change, a prisoner now can be released to the general inmate population if prison investigators determine that he has been free from gang activity for six years.

The hunger strike was organized by Steve Castillo, an inmate at Pelican Bay's Security Housing Unit who has waged a legal campaign for years on this issue and whose suit led to the 1999 rule change.

Here are some excerpts from a recent letter from Castillo explaining why he organized the hunger strike:

"A hunger strike (besides the obvious) is generally a desperate plea for help. And it is a plea that usually follows the exhaustion of all other attempts to bring about the necessary change; when there exists no adequate or speedy remedy; or, when the required change is immediately needed.

"Rarely in a lifetime do we ever witness a sane person go insane. And even more rare is it to witness such an occurrence happen more than once. . . . Here, I have seen such things more times than I want to remember. I thought that seeing a prisoner get shot by staff was a frightening and chilling event, but that in no way compares to seeing a prisoner calmly playing a game of chess with pieces made out of his own feces. Or, prisoners smearing their bodies and cells with their feces. Or, watching prisoners throwing urine and feces at each other through the perforated cell doors. And worse yet, since we are cell fed, we eat our meals under these conditions.

"In sum, this place seems to lose all semblance of a prison and instead takes on a laboratory environment for human experimentation."

The SHU inmates suspended their hunger strike after California state Sen. Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles), chairman of the Joint Committee on Prison Construction and Operations, promised to probe the situation expeditiously. If their grievances are not addressed, the prisoners vow to resume their hunger strike in January.

Fifteen years of 22-hour days alone in a small concrete box, after being stigmatized as a gang member for helping a fellow inmate sign a letter, or because a guard has it in for you?

Californians have no right to lecture any country in the world on prison conditions while these horrors persist.

Copyright 2001, Los Angeles Ti
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  #11  
Old 05-23-2005, 11:42 AM
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CORCORAN: Hellhole of California--and other California Security Housing Units
by Corey Weinstein and Catherine Campbell

Corey Weinstein, M.D., has been visiting prisons and prisoners for 25 years and has been working with California Prison Focus for the past six years. Catherine Campbell, an attorney and CPF President, received the State Bar's 1996 President's Pro Bono Service award for her volunteer work with prisoners and their families. Corey and Catherine have conducted 16 investigative visits to Security Housing Units in this state and interviewed people in adjacent maximum security facilities.

Corcoran Prison is one of the major Se-curity Housing Units (SHUs) in California. One of the purposes of a SHU is to extract information from prisoners labeled as gang members (often through a kangaroo court). SHU prisoners are told, "You don't get out of here until you snitch on your (alleged) gang members." Throwing people into solitary confinement in order to extract information is prevented by the Geneva Accords during time of war but permitted in every state in this country under federal law.

SHU prisoners sit in their cells at least 22 1/2 hours a day. They have no hobbies, very few books, no TV or radio unless they can afford to buy one, no physical contact with anybody, not even other prisoners. The physical nature of these units-solitary confinement and sensory deprivation-is brutalizing, not only to the prisoners but to those who service them on a daily basis-the guards. And wherever we find one of these units, we find brutality by guards.

One kind of brutality is the "greet-the-bus" behavior developed by the guards at Corcoran. The guards who did this a lot called themselves the "Sharks" because they would attack prisoners without warning. Prisoners fully shackled-handcuffs chained to their waist-chains, legs hobbled with chains around their ankles-would come in on buses and be met by guards, often wearing black gloves, truncheons in hand, face-shields in place, badges covered (so that they could not be identified by name), who would beat them unmercifully. One notorious greet-the-bus incident happened when a busload of so-called East Side Crips arrived. The guards mistakenly thought these guys had been involved in the assault of an officer at Calipatria Prison in Southern California, so they brutalized them. They broke the ribs of five of them, banged their heads into the walls, shaved their heads, and humiliated, taunted, harassed, and physically tortured them. This was routine ritualistic behavior that ended recently because of the publicity over this particular incident.

Another kind of ritualized brutality is the "gladiator" arena. In the Corcoran SHU, 20 inmates at a time were sent out to the yard in groups of rival gangs-African American inmates from Southern California, Hispanic inmates from Southern California, white inmates, etc. These groups are historic rivals with one another akin to the kind of conflict in Bosnia and Croatia. Such rivalries go so deep and are so profound and divisive that there's no alternative for these inmates but to fight with one another.

The guards had unfettered discretion to move people around from cell to cell, so they would choose inmates who were better fighters, inmates they wanted to see beat up, inmates they wanted to see shot, inmates they wanted to watch fight, inmates who had a history of assault on officers, and pair them in configurations that would inevitably lead to a brutal confrontation. Many of these fights were allowed to go on for some time before finally being halted by firing the 37 mm. gas gun, which produces severe injuries although not any deaths. If the inmates did not get down after the gas gun was fired, the tower would gun them down with dumdum bullets from a high powered 9 mm. rifle. This gladiator sport began in 1989 when Corcoran first opened. That year Corcoran had a rate of inmate assaults five times that for any other institution in California, a statistic that should have warned Sacramento that there was a serious problem.

The gladiator sport was pursuant to what Sacramento called the "integrated yard policy." The ostensible rationale for this policy was to teach inmates to get along with one another. But there was never any research or monitoring of how the integrated-yard policy was actually applied in spite of fifty inmates being shot over the years, seven of them dying as a result of gunshot wounds. The seven prisoners gunned down at Corcoran represent more prisoners shot and killed by guards than at all other prisons in the United States combined during the same period, yet no investigation was conducted into the policy until Preston Tate was killed on August 2, 1994. Preston Tate had been in the jail system approximately three years and had just come back on a parole violation when he was killed. Then for the first time officers came forward to the press and to the FBI and reported the consequences of the policy.

We are suing on behalf of Preston Tate's parents, Bill and Vivian Tate, who live in Southern California. The California Department of Corrections documents almost everything that it does-transfer documents, disciplinary reports, incident reports, etc.-so there are volumes and volumes of written evidence on how these fights occurred and how they were set up.

There's an eerie resemblance between the gang culture amongst prisoners and the gang culture amongst guards. Striking and dramatic! Guards refer to themselves as "gangs" and inmates see them as belonging to particular gangs. Guards share the same codes of behavior that exist amongst inmates. We know about the Sharks at Corcoran because prisoners who don't know each other give us the same information. We know that there's a group of guards up at Pelican Bay who call themselves White Lightning. This is a tight little community within a prison, walled off from the rest of us. The California prison system is the most insular and one of the most brutal in this land. (One thing that makes New York a little bit better, is that they have had community oversight institutionalized for many years.) There have been 33 gunshot deaths in California in the last 5 years.

Prison is a very destructive kind of environment for the individual. It is specifically designed to destroy the person's personality, and debilitate him or her physically and psychologically. In general, prisoners are faced with horrible overcrowding, terrible unsanitary conditions, enforced idleness, and hopelessness. Now their ability to reach out to the community through media has been severely hampered by the media ban in California. Also, the family visitation program for prisoners with serious violations and those in high security housing has ended, thereby fracturing the family. Prison tends to create an institutionalized person, who has nothing to do, has no hope, and is wrenched away from family. About 90% return to society worse off than when they went in.

As a result, the criminal justice system is increasingly politicized, beginning with the determinate sentencing law and culminating in the three-strikes law. We are criminalizing previously non-criminal conduct. We have raised misdemeanors to felonies in order to put people back into prison. A thousand bills were passed by the California legislature from 1984 to 1992 that toughened sentencing laws in California.

Right now one of the biggest threats to our neighborhoods is the racially-based hysteria about gang involvement of kids that tends to label youngsters as gangsters while they're in their early teens, and insists on their gang affiliation while they're in juvenile facilities, which exacerbates the problem. If they go to the California Youth Authority, that hardens their gang affiliation in the context of a prison environment. Two-thirds of the inmates in California prisons are now affiliated with some kind of street or prison gang. These are young people who might never have been affiliated with any such organization, or would have been innocently so had they not been hooked up with the criminal justice system.

Since around 1975, when an inmate comes into the Department of Corrections, he is asked, "What gang do you belong to?" as though it is assumed that he is affiliated one way or another. The problem is particularly egregious for Hispanics, who are assumed to belong to either the Northern Hispanics or the Southern Hispanics. They are compelled, because of their origin, to ally themselves with a particular group of Hispanic inmates-channeled into an affiliation that becomes ultimately damning for them in the prison environment. It's incredibly difficult for an inmate to remain unaffiliated in some way or another.

It is in the interest of the California Department of Corrections and our law enforcement system generally, to promote the existence of gangs. It's money. Counties get enormous amounts of federal money if they can show that they have a gang problem in their neighborhood. So kids who happen to dress a particular way or look a particular way are labeled, and gang files are developed on when they are 13 years old because they happen to be Hispanic. It begins there. It begins on the streets of ordinary towns like Fresno, and it reaches a level of inescapability.

The higher the security of the institution, the more impacting is the psychological trauma of the institution. If you're at a Level 1 or a Level 2 prison, you may actually escape a lot of the brutality and psychological traumas. If you're in a Level 3 medium security prison, it can go either way. But if you're in a Level 4 or in a SHU, that's hard time; that's where a lot of the impact occurs. All you have to do is commit one or two serious rule violations to be moved to one of those SHUs. That's where minds fracture. Prisoners begin to have hyper-responsiveness to small amounts of stimuli; they have trouble understanding what's going on around them; they may "nut up" and begin to hear things and see things; they become suspicious, feel great rage inside with no place to carry that rage. They can self-mutilate, begin to do things that they would never have considered doing, and which none of their family members could have thought possible. Over and over again, families observing this tragedy call us, begging us to help their loved one inside: "I don't know him any more." "He's a different person." "She's totally changed." " I don't know what it's going to be like when she gets out."

We have a state-wide culture-a major industry in this state-that is largely dependent on the criminal justice system. There is a violence/money link within the Department of Corrections that is very much like national defense issues in the fifties and sixties. If you have enough fear, if you have sufficient objectification of an enemy, if you have a wide enough social divide between those who are on the inside and those who are on the outside, and if you have people who profit from it monetarily, politically and in other ways, then every effort will be made to exaggerate the danger and maximize the use of security to justify expenditures. That's what we have in the prison system in the state of California.

The construction of prisons has provided an increasing ability to physically control the prisoners. What we see in the Security Housing Units or the 180 so-called maximum security prisons is that the towers have an easy view of the entire yard and the whole prison, so they don't have to engage in social contact any more. At Alcatraz the guards walked among the prisoners and had to negotiate that common space, but in many prisons today there is very little common space. This is the great marvel of electronic doors and video camera visualizations, and new constructions that are such money makers for major firms building these kinds of prisons. In California Security Housing Units, an officer will never come in contact with an inmate whose feet are not shackled and whose hands are not handcuffed to chains around his/her waist.

The average educational level of a prisoner in California is 8th grade. In some prisons, particularly women's prisons, there's an opportunity to get a high school diploma through a GED program. At some prisons, inmates have been able to access correspondence courses, but they tend to be the small number of inmates who are competent at gaining access to various resources on the outside. Nothing within the prison system allows for that except in Level 1 for the older inmates or those in for a very minor offense who will get out in a relatively short time. There is no system-wide educational or inmate training program. Yet there's a California law requiring prisoners to be able to read and write when they exit the prison system. No authorities have ever been prosecuted for not observing that law. And a few years ago, the whole idea of rehabilitation was completely removed from law and legal mandate in this state. There's no legal reason or need to rehabilitate prisoners in this state now.

The average time served in a California prison is 21.3 months. Recidivism is presently 80%. They are violating people on parole for trivial reasons. The underlying statistic is that 70% of the crimes that result in incarceration in the state of California are drug and alcohol related (including even what might be violent crime). The average person entering the California Department of Corrections during the last five years is there for petty drug use or petty drug sales. The recent massive explosion in the incarcerated populations from the "drug war" has been called the war against poor and black and brown communities.

What is going on in the communities to bring about the increase in incarceration? We have not reached an acknowledgment that when we make an arrest, it is not a victory. Incarcerating someone is a sign of social failure, not a sign of social success. Something needs to be done, or not done, long before somebody is arrested in order to reduce the level of arrests and incarceration. Ultimately arrests and incarceration are dangerous, not only to the people who happen to be the victims of arrest and incarceration, but to the rest of us as well.

Material for this article was excerpted and edited, with permission, from Jerry Brown's interview of Corey Weinstein and Catherine Campbell on the "We the People" radio program.
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Old 05-23-2005, 11:51 AM
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CALIFORNIA PRISON FOCUS
2940 16TH STREET, SUITE B5
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103
415-252-9211
FAX: 415-252-9311
PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release – July 5, 2004.
Contact:
Charles Carbone, Esq. of California Prison Focus 415-252-9211 or 415-531-1980
HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP ISSUES SCATHING CRITIQUE OF PRISONER ABUSES AT
CORCORAN STATE PRISON

July 5, 2004 — Human rights group California Prison Focus (CPF) issued a scathing report of prisoner abuse inside California State Prison at Corcoran (CSP-Corcoran) which houses 5000 maximum and super-maximum prisoners. The report is based on approximately 400 in-person interviews with inmates and numerous correspondences. The findings conclude severe patterns of abuse, in the areas of excessive force, solitary confinement, medical neglect, denied access to legal materials, harassment, retaliation by prison staff, faulty administrative grievance procedures for inmates (602 process), unsanitary living conditions, and other issues.

Several examples of the abuses of prisoners include:

• One prisoner suffered a brutal assault, nine cases of abuse by mechanical restraints,
deprivation of antidepressants, and starvation of over a total of sixty meals (once five
days in a row). In addition, correctional officers have told the inmate to kill himself and
had installed a security camera in his cell to route the signal to inmate TVs, for the
purpose of humiliation.
• Prisoners witness correctional officers destroying prisoner grievance forms.
• On June 24, 2003, a prisoner was attacked in an unprovoked manner by correctional
officers B. David and D. Morales while handcuffed behind his back, suffering a swollen
jaw, eye, and lips. On November 10, 2003, the same inmate was assaulted by Sgt. F.
Reynolds, correctional officers M. McVey, R.S. Sloss, K. Edmonds, M. Martinez, and
Sgt. Reynolds, who used a canister of pepper spray to strike his head.
• Numerous prisoners report being subject to erroneous and fabricated evidence used to label them as gang members or associates, resulting in indefinite confinement in solitary lock-ups.
• On 10/19/02, California Prison Focus’ HIV/Hepatitis C in Prison committee cited three inmates that had died of HIV in the previous two weeks. CPF requested an investigation into the deaths, claiming that the inmates did not get access to adequate pain medication, that they were not transferred to a prison hospice, and that they were not recommended for “compassionate release.”
• One prisoner recalls being confined to a holding cell in Corcoran’s SHU 4A-IR on 12/15/03 where his neighboring inmate died because of the officers’ negligence in not responding to the inmate’s cries from chest pains.
2
• In an incident referred to as a “Super Bowl horror,” prison guards neglected an inmate’s cries for help as they watched the 2/01/04 football game on television. The 60-year-old inmate continued to bleed after pulling the dialysis shunt from his arm, resulting in a hemorrhagic death. None of the guards had been charged for negligence at the time of CPF’s investigation.
“Corcoran is synonymous with torture. Whether it is beating prisoners or watching them bleed to death, Corcoran has proven that it has no regard for human life. This prison does dangerously little to promote public safety or the welfare of inmates,” says Charles Carbone, Esq. of California Prison Focus. The Report calls for serious reforms and monitoring of prison administrators. If this does not occur, the study notes that prisoner abuse will worsen.
A full copy of the report titled, “Corcoran State Prison: The Worst Human Rights Abuses in California” 2002-2004 is available at www.prisons.org. California Prison Focus is a 14 year-old non-profit human rights group that advances and defends the rights of prisoners in California.
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Old 05-23-2005, 12:48 PM
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California SHU testimony from Corcoran
Corcoran State Prison is located in Kings County in Central California. It is designed as a SHU (Security Housing Unit). SHUs are for convicts who have violated serious rule violations, or prison gang members.

There are specific time limits on how long the CDC may hold a convict in a SHU unit for rule violations. For example, I'm serving an 18 month SHU for "battery on staff." The average stay in the SHU is 24 months.

SHU units are devoid of most privileges, you have no access to the phone, no contact visits. By law you are allowed 10 hours a week of yard time. However, in my building, I only get about 3 hours every 2 weeks. The CDC is also mandated by law to provide library service to SHU inmates. But here it's a joke. There is a cart of about 20 dated romance novels. You may have one book every two weeks. You may have only a minimum of personal property. You are not allowed any personal clothes, your photos are limited to 10.

You are allowed a TV or a radio if you have one. You are also allowed a $45 a month canteen draw where you can buy cosmetic and food items. Indigent convicts are supplied with soap, toothpowder and little else. You may receive books from the outside, if you are fortunate enough to have someone send some.

You are restricted to your cell 24 hours a day. The cells themselves are made of solid concrete. Two slabs side by side, a toilet/sink is at the front of the cell. A small frosted window sits in the back. You have no direct access to the lights. Bright lights are on from 6:00am until 10:00 pm. Then the lights are dimmed all other hours.

You receive 3 meals a day. Breakfast, a bag lunch and dinner. All combined you receive about 2000 calories a day. The food is not very good, and the portions are very small. Just enough to keep you alive.

The cops are mostly mean spirited and petty. That is true in most other prisons. I personally try to avoid any interaction with them. The staff here at Corcoran were involved in criminal and civil litigation in the late 90s.

They were accused of arranging fights amongst prisoners and gambling on the outcome. They were also accused of murder. By shooting two convicts to death. The involved staff were acquitted at jury trial on the criminal charges and the CDC settled the civil suit for $600,000. $600,000 for a human life.

There are 3 SHU units in California. Pelican Bay, Tehachapi and here at Corcoran. I have been to all 3 and Corcoran is by far the worst. By American standards, this is probably one of the worst prisons in the country as far as living conditions go.

-- a Corcoran prisoner, August 2003
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Old 05-23-2005, 01:32 PM
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I could spend a lot of time picking out the errors in those articles but I don't have the time right now.


But I will point out 1 since it was addressed in the original post. It takes 3 completely separate and independent pieces of information linking an inmate to a gang to validate that inmate as a gang member. It isn't just done cause a guard doesn't like the inmate or at the drop of a hat.
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Old 05-23-2005, 08:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SGT Anonymous
It takes 3 completely separate and independent pieces of information linking an inmate to a gang to validate that inmate as a gang member. It isn't just done cause a guard doesn't like the inmate or at the drop of a hat.
1. Possession of literature or art construed as gang-related
2. Writing to another prisoner's family
3. Assisting another prisoner with legal work
4. Signing birthday or get well cards to prisoners
5. Exercising or otherwise interacting with another prisoner suspected of
gang involvement.

It might as well be a GUARD or INFORMANT since validating a person is made so EASY for CDC.

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Old 05-25-2005, 09:01 AM
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Thank you Kathy for the responses and concern, and especially for the work you are doing.

Sgt, My friend had a (bogus)gang affiliation attached to his charges, so that's how he ended up in the SHU.... he has been there eight years. He has written his own appeals and was SUCCESSFUL in getting the gang affiliation DROPPED, yet he is still in SHU. He told me that the CDC has it's OWN system and they claim he associates with gang members, yet he is housed only with gang members, so how much sense does that make?

Kathy- I am amazed at how he copes. He is a VICTIM of the 3 strike BS law and NO WAY should this guy being doing life, IMO, but that is something he will have to continue to battle out in the courts. Politicians , imo don't give a crap about the prisoners but I'm hoping the overcrowding and need to house "new" offenders will pave the way for some serious reform on the three strikes law. (sorry, that's a rant for a different section, I think)

I don't know why he was only allowed 15 sheets of paper..... he did say he will have to file a 602 to get the rest. I just sent 15 more sheets. I also sent two paperback books from Amazon in the last month, and he still has not recieved them. I am going to send an access package as soon as I find out what he wants, since he can only get one per year (why is that? ) I want it to be the best that it can be.

Kathy- do you know of any links to sites that offer legal resources or advice for people working on their own appeals?
Thanks so much for all your help.
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Old 05-25-2005, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaver
Thank you Kathy for the responses and concern, and especially for the work you are doing.
Sgt, My friend had a (bogus)gang affiliation attached to his charges, so that's how he ended up in the SHU.... he has been there eight years. He has written his own appeals and was SUCCESSFUL in getting the gang affiliation DROPPED, yet he is still in SHU. He told me that the CDC has it's OWN system and they claim he associates with gang members, yet he is housed only with gang members, so how much sense does that make?
Kathy- I am amazed at how he copes. He is a VICTIM of the 3 strike BS law and NO WAY should this guy being doing life, IMO, but that is something he will have to continue to battle out in the courts. Politicians , imo don't give a crap about the prisoners but I'm hoping the overcrowding and need to house "new" offenders will pave the way for some serious reform on the three strikes law. (sorry, that's a rant for a different section, I think)
I don't know why he was only allowed 15 sheets of paper..... he did say he will have to file a 602 to get the rest. I just sent 15 more sheets. I also sent two paperback books from Amazon in the last month, and he still has not recieved them. I am going to send an access package as soon as I find out what he wants, since he can only get one per year (why is that? ) I want it to be the best that it can be.
Kathy- do you know of any links to sites that offer legal resources or advice for people working on their own appeals?
Thanks so much for all your help.


Dear Weaver, my son is in the SHU on a BOGUS 115. He also received more time, so he is maxed out. I feel my advocating for him might have pushed his charges. But, my son will come home soon and this nightmare will be behind us (HIS WORDS)

Where do I begin, first, Sgt. your quote: "It isn't just done cause a guard doesn't like the inmate or at the drop of a hat."

My comment is "HA!" It is done everyday at a drop of a hat and especially if a guard doesn't like an inmate. CDC has Kangaroo Kourts, just because an inmates charges are a DA Reject, CDC comes back and slams the inmate with "WELL, I THINK YOU DID IT"

In fact, before my son left the other prison to go to Corcoran a Guard put a 115 in my son's file as a PRESENT to me. It stated "Temporary hold "NO MINORS ALLOWED TO VISIT THIS INMATE" My son NEVER received this BOGUS 115. His counselor said she went threw the file and she never saw it in it. We did not know of this BOGUS 115 until I brought my mentally disabled Granddaughter to visit my son. BINGO, it popped up. 10 yrs of visiting him in prison and all of a sudden "NO MINORS ALLOWED" Makes you go Hmmm? She was very upset and SAD that she couldn't see her Big Brother that Day and I thank GOD I had my Husband with me to handle her while I visited my son.

A few phone calls the next day and an emergence hearing was set up. The BOGUS 115 was unfounded and taken out of the file and computer system.

Weaver, the best thing you can do is get your loved one this BOOK:

THE CALIFORNIA STATE PRISONERS HANDBOOK, THIRD EDITION & 2004 SUPPLEMENT
http://www.prisonlaw.com/orderforminprogress.htm

Also, get the Gang Validation hand book by Charles Carbone by e-mailing him at:

charleseye@hotmail.com

I have the book and can copy pages for you.

I have advocated for inmates at Corcoran & have been known to get a few out of the Hole on bogus charges.

As for the paper, in my book they are retaliating against your loved one by only allowing 15 pages. If you want to PM me and give me his name and number I will call on his behalf and get him what he needs. I do it all the time and if the inmate doesn't get results, I just call someone above the prisons head. It works all the time.

Do to all the crap I have put up with the prison system I started an organization called
"FAMILIES AGAINST CORRECTIONAL EXCESSIVE INTERNAL TERRORISM"
http://www.clear-foundation.com/ or simply "F.A.C.E. I.T."

I am tired of hearing about the inhumane treatment of people in Prison and will shout from the highest building to end it.
I AM MAD AS HELL AND WON'T TAKE IT ANY MORE!

Love
Kathy

PS SHUT DOWN THE SHU's!
PSS I will PM you this Post just in case it disappears into PTO Space!
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Old 05-25-2005, 12:03 PM
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OFF TOPIC BUT I AM ON A ROLL:

Sex Scandal at Corcoran Prison
May 9, 2005 — A Visalia doctor has surrendered his medical license because of his involvement in a sex scandal at Corcoran Prison.

The Visalia Times-Delta reports the state medical board accused Dr. James Pendleton, Jr. of having sexual relations with an HIV positive inmate at the prison.
The board says Pendleton told the inmate that a cure for HIV already existed.

It also says he used a study on HIV to manipulate the inmate into having sexual relations.

Pendleton admitted his conduct was unprofessional while he was a doctor at the prison, but he denied sexual contact with the inmate.

The medical board says it has him on tape admitting to the relationship.
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Old 05-26-2005, 07:17 AM
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Hi Kathy,

Thanks for the info. What is a 115? Is that the gang validation thing?
Also- on the book you suggested... I have no problem ordering it, but I'm concerned he might not get it since he has not recieved my other books I'm waiting to hear if got either one of them..... is there a limit on how many they can recieve? I'm starting to think the mailroom there does what they want.
I'm sorry to hear about your son. Will he be getting out anytime soon?
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Old 05-26-2005, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
Where do I begin, first, Sgt. your quote: "It isn't just done cause a guard doesn't like the inmate or at the drop of a hat."

My comment is "HA!" It is done everyday at a drop of a hat and especially if a guard doesn't like an inmate. CDC has Kangaroo Kourts, just because an inmates charges are a DA Reject, CDC comes back and slams the inmate with "WELL, I THINK YOU DID IT"


We weren't talking about 115's, Not sure where that came from so I will not comment on it. The original poster is talking about gang validation and on that topic my statements stand.
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Old 05-27-2005, 07:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SGT Anonymous

We weren't talking about 115's, Not sure where that came from so I will not comment on it. The original poster is talking about gang validation and on that topic my statements stand.
Sgt, what is a 115?
Also, did you see that I responded that my friend went straight to the SHU because his original charges, which he was convicted for (unfairly) included a gang allegation. He appealed (on his own) and got two reversals on the 4 charges, one being the gang allegation.....
Can you explain to me why the CDOC doesn't re-evaluate him since it was reversed?! Also, how can he avoid the "gang associations" when all he is housed with are other people supposidly in gangs? That makes no sense to me!
Thanks for any insight!
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Old 05-27-2005, 10:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaver
Sgt, My friend had a (bogus)gang affiliation attached to his charges
Dear Weaver when you mentioned CHARGES that is a 115 write up. I'm glad your friend fought a mighty fight and didn't lay down like a dog. Here is a 602 Appeal process and an insight to what your friend has done to clear himself.
http://www.prisonlaw.com/pdfs/appeal.pdf

My QUOTE:
Where do I begin, first, Sgt. your quote: "It isn't just done cause a guard doesn't like the inmate or at the drop of a hat."
My comment is "HA!" It is done everyday at a drop of a hat and especially if a guard doesn't like an inmate. CDC has Kangaroo Kourts, just because an inmates charges are a DA Reject, CDC comes back and slams the inmate with "WELL, I THINK YOU DID IT"

Sgt you stated this:
We weren't talking about 115's, Not sure where that came from so I will not comment on it. The original poster is talking about gang validation and on that topic my statements stand.


There were many questions/topic's asked by Weaver and I was only trying to be helpful. CHARGES/115 go hand in hand and not from Left Field!

The Orginal Poster "WEAVER" started a Thread about CORCORAN SHU with many questions about CORCORAN.

As you stand on GANG VALIDATIONS, I also stand on HOW inmates are CHARGED/115 with Gang Validations.
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Old 05-27-2005, 10:45 AM
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128 (minor write-up) or a 115 (major write-up)

A Prisoner's Dictionary
http://dictionary.prisonwall.org/

128: CDC informational chrono, as in Form 128-G.

115: A rules violation report (CDC Form 115) can lead to disciplinary action. It may be classified as either "administrative" or "serious."

602: The prisoner grievance or administrative appeal process (CDC Form 602). This process provides three formal levels of review, beginning institutional levels and progressing to the Director's review in Sacramento. Although the appeals process provides a means to express complaints, there are many problems with the system and appeals are frequently "lost" at the informal levels of review.
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Last edited by Kathy; 05-27-2005 at 10:55 AM..
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Old 05-27-2005, 11:15 AM
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115s and Gang Validations are two different things. A 115 can be written and issued to an inmate in a few hours. Gang Validations take weeks. An inmate can get a SHU term from a 115 depending on the seriousness of the charges but one does not always include the other. They are separate.

If he is in SHU for just for a Gang Validation and he has successfully appealed the validation then they should reevaluate his SHU placement. As I don't know the specifics of his case though I can't tell you for sure one way or another.
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Old 05-27-2005, 06:32 PM
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C. Cornman
Long Beach, CA

I am not taking sides here, by any means, as my loved one has been harrassed by CO's in a California prison (due to the nature of his case) to the point that he had to stand up for himself or it would have never stopped. He narrowly avoided a SHU term and is now in Ad Seg. I would like to thank Kathy for the work she is doing as a prisoners rights activist, it is a continual uphill battle and not an easy cause to represent. I also am "mad as hell" at the CDC, (and the BPT......). I am disgusted at the things that are happening on a daily basis inside these prisons and that they are ignored, it is inexcuseable.

I would however also like to recognize and thank Sgt. Anonymous for the insight given, posting replys to many questions that may have gone unanswered, and for a view from the perspective of a Calif. CO .

Thanks and God bless,
Christina
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