Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > FOR FAMILY & FRIENDS > Parents with Children in Prison
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Parents with Children in Prison For the parents of prisoners

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-12-2019, 12:48 PM
lizlizzie2's Avatar
lizlizzie2 lizlizzie2 is online now
Liz
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Arizona
Posts: 990
Thanks: 1,930
Thanked 1,577 Times in 610 Posts
Default I am afraid instead of happy

Next month my son comes homes from prison. He will have been in jail and prison for 6 years 9 1/2 months. I feel like I should be happy and excited. Instead I am afraid.

He has been in a controlled environment for so long and the world is not within his control. It doesn't follow the same rules and schedules. I am afraid of what happens when what he wants doesn't happen. I know he wants to go to school. I know he wants to find a job. Everything takes time. Right now, I can't even figure how he gets a driver's license because he never got one here and I discovered his license in WI was probationary (he doesn't know why) and his license was revoked 3 months after he moved here. The website doesn't pull it up for us to figure out what WI wants to reinstate it. I suspect he has to straighten that out before he can get a license here. All of that will take time and I suspect money. He will be past the deadline to apply to the fall semester for financial aid and he has to be accepted at the college first. And, none of this even addresses the issues of an ex-con finding a job in a very Republican county and a less than 40k people whose income is dependent on the military post.

I looked at moving elsewhere the first 2 years he was in, but I couldn't afford it, nor could we actually decide on a place in AZ. My incomes is stationary due to disability and I can't sell my house for enough to afford another one.

I know the answer is to let go of the fear; that's it's all up to him what he makes out of his future. I know I don't have any control over any of it, except to be there and listen when he runs into roadblocks. Knowing and feeling it are two different things.

Mostly, I am writing this because I doubt I am alone in feeling the fear rather than the happiness. Writing it down may help others feel less alone. To deal with things, we have to acknowledge them first, at least it's always been that way for me.
Reply With Quote
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to lizlizzie2 For This Useful Post:
Itshardtowait (04-13-2019), JadensMom127 (04-15-2019), Lordbew/us (04-12-2019), Mama33 (04-19-2019), miamac (04-12-2019), MsFish (04-15-2019), Sarianna (04-20-2019), tglsmom (04-13-2019), trauma4us (04-20-2019)
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-12-2019, 01:09 PM
Wolf9785 Wolf9785 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 91
Thanks: 78
Thanked 42 Times in 19 Posts
Default

My son served 4 years upstate. I knew what he was doing (illegal activity)and just waited for that phone call I knew was coming. Anyway, your fears are real and understandable. My son is now home and working and about to become a father. I still worry every time I see a phone call coming in from my exwife that he's back in trouble. He has 1 more year of parole and I pray he makes it. So don't beat yourself up, he's got to want the freedom enough to fly straight.
Reply With Quote
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Wolf9785 For This Useful Post:
Guccigrl (04-12-2019), Kimimi (04-12-2019), lizlizzie2 (04-15-2019), Mama33 (04-19-2019), sidewalker (04-13-2019), Subie24 (06-11-2019), tglsmom (04-13-2019)
  #3  
Old 04-12-2019, 01:39 PM
miamac's Avatar
miamac miamac is offline
Site Moderator Gone Mad on leave

Staff Superstar Winner PTO Site Moderator 

 

Join Date: May 2013
Location: ORnativeAZresCAtied
Posts: 10,873
Thanks: 14,633
Thanked 21,537 Times in 7,637 Posts
Default

I'm not a parent, but a wife and I have the same fears for my husband when he is released (16+ years inside). He has a lot of hopes and dreams and they're all very realistic. No pie in the sky here. But as grounded as they are, I worry the world won't be as welcoming. In prison he has all the props a man could hope for. He stays out of trouble, so he gets kudos for that. He is a good worker, so he gets boosted up for that. He is a solid mentor in several programs so that makes him a little bigger fish in a rather small pond. But out here? The same level of effort is bare minimum and no one is running around putting gold stars on our chests for doing it. I fear he will feel the impact of a competitive job market where just doing your job isn't enough and feel defeated.

But I can't control any of that. We've talked about it. I remind him that there are no chronos here to go in your file (write up for doing a good job). No one sits us down once a year to tell us how well we're adulting. He knows, but as you said...knowing and feeling, right?
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to miamac For This Useful Post:
Guccigrl (04-12-2019), JadensMom127 (04-15-2019), lizlizzie2 (04-15-2019), Mama33 (04-19-2019), Sarianna (04-20-2019)
  #4  
Old 04-12-2019, 04:58 PM
fbopnomore fbopnomore is online now
Site Moderator

PTO Site Moderator Staff Superstar Winner 

Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 28,688
Thanks: 45,267
Thanked 21,875 Times in 12,632 Posts
Default

My guess is that the situation will turn out to be much less of a problem than you fear. Being an ex convict definitely gives him a lot of excuses as to why he will probably fail, but he also has the power to succeed, and even thrive as long as he keeps his eye on the prize, and never gives up.

My best advice is not to anticipate problems, but to quickly address any that actually surface.
__________________
Reply With Quote
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to fbopnomore For This Useful Post:
JadensMom127 (04-15-2019), lizlizzie2 (04-15-2019), Lordbew/us (04-12-2019), Mama33 (04-19-2019), miamac (04-12-2019), Mikesmom81 (04-26-2019), sidewalker (04-13-2019), Subie24 (06-11-2019), tglsmom (04-13-2019)
  #5  
Old 04-12-2019, 09:07 PM
matrock130 matrock130 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Virginia, United States
Posts: 324
Thanks: 99
Thanked 332 Times in 207 Posts
Default getting out

Quote:
Originally Posted by lizlizzie2 View Post
Next month my son comes homes from prison. He will have been in jail and prison for 6 years 9 1/2 months. I feel like I should be happy and excited. Instead I am afraid.

He has been in a controlled environment for so long and the world is not within his control. It doesn't follow the same rules and schedules. I am afraid of what happens when what he wants doesn't happen. I know he wants to go to school. I know he wants to find a job. Everything takes time. Right now, I can't even figure how he gets a driver's license because he never got one here and I discovered his license in WI was probationary (he doesn't know why) and his license was revoked 3 months after he moved here. The website doesn't pull it up for us to figure out what WI wants to reinstate it. I suspect he has to straighten that out before he can get a license here. All of that will take time and I suspect money. He will be past the deadline to apply to the fall semester for financial aid and he has to be accepted at the college first. And, none of this even addresses the issues of an ex-con finding a job in a very Republican county and a less than 40k people whose income is dependent on the military post.

I looked at moving elsewhere the first 2 years he was in, but I couldn't afford it, nor could we actually decide on a place in AZ. My incomes is stationary due to disability and I can't sell my house for enough to afford another one.

I know the answer is to let go of the fear; that's it's all up to him what he makes out of his future. I know I don't have any control over any of it, except to be there and listen when he runs into roadblocks. Knowing and feeling it are two different things.

Mostly, I am writing this because I doubt I am alone in feeling the fear rather than the happiness. Writing it down may help others feel less alone. To deal with things, we have to acknowledge them first, at least it's always been that way for me.
I remember the days after my daughter got out. Looking for a job was difficult. Many a time I would meet her after a job search and she would be crying and asking what do they want from me...I tell them the truth and admit that I made a huge mistake but I need a job to get back on my feet. I just had to keep encouraging her to continue on and it would get better. A job would be there. 6 years later she is working in a law office as a paralegal and doing well. It was a long haul but persistence pays off. It will be hard but can be done. She worked at a nursery for a year right after prison outside. good luck and my prayers are with you.
Reply With Quote
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to matrock130 For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (04-12-2019), Itshardtowait (04-13-2019), JadensMom127 (04-15-2019), lizlizzie2 (04-15-2019), Mama33 (04-19-2019), miamac (04-13-2019), Sarianna (04-20-2019), tglsmom (04-13-2019)
  #6  
Old 04-13-2019, 06:47 AM
sidewalker sidewalker is offline
CA, LASO, site sug. SUPER MOD

PTO Super Moderator Staff Superstar Winner 

Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: ca usa
Posts: 31,974
Thanks: 56,581
Thanked 30,419 Times in 15,210 Posts
Default

Agree, your fears are not unreasonable at all.

Also not a child but my hub.
He was in for 5.57 years. Once he was released he could not live with me. So basically between finding a motel that would work. He's an rso so he had to have permission to stay any place and was basically homeless which in of itself sucked.
He had all sorts of issues trying to get it back together. He lost his cdl while in prison, and we had no extra money to get it back.
He ended up doing a few small jobs, doing handyman type stuff. And then got into doing vineyard work. Very hard work, and it was very seasonal. He had to get permission to work because alot of it was work at night sometimes. He got lucky and one of the bosses liked him. Boss found out he knew how to drive and had him bringing the supplies around the vineyard (porta potty, water station, basic medical stuff like ice packs, bandaids etc....) Also running the tractor thingy.

From there, he got info on how to get his cdl back. Only problem with that was...you had to be a citizen. Hub was naturalized in the early 70's. But no paperwork could be found. Had do reapply for a copy. That took like 8 months and several hundred dollars. He finally got into the classes. Aced it all.
Then it was finding a job. He managed to find a place that hired him (and knew what was up with him being on parole, and an rso)
All this time he was homeless on and off. He could come here for two, 2 hr time periods to charge his gps, and eat and shower.
When he finally had enough money, he found a place that was compliant with his housing restrictions, and parole approved plus it was affordable.
It was very difficult for me, and for him and until finally FINALLY he was released from parole (earlier than we suspected, but thats a whole nother chapter in this novel)
He is now off parole, working at the new job driving truck

(oh and the whole paperwork naturalization work, had an error in it. We didnt realize it until he went this past july to get a new dl and found out he needed a *real id*
They messed up his birthday on the copy we got in 2013) So he quite possibly could have had his dl lapse again, and would have to go thru all that crap again!!
We got lucky and got a break and were issued a new correct copy of his naturalization paperwork.)


so its NOT without struggles. It will be hard. But it can be done, and it will be worth it.


sorry so long.
__________________
My windows aren't dirty

That's my dog's nose art

Reply With Quote
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to sidewalker For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (04-13-2019), JadensMom127 (04-15-2019), lizlizzie2 (04-15-2019), Mama33 (04-19-2019), miamac (04-13-2019), MsFish (04-15-2019), Sarianna (04-20-2019), Subie24 (06-11-2019), tglsmom (04-13-2019)
  #7  
Old 04-13-2019, 01:42 PM
Firebrand's Avatar
Firebrand Firebrand is offline
The Cowtown Moderator

PTO Moderator 

 

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 2,206
Thanks: 1,977
Thanked 5,037 Times in 1,271 Posts
Default

Even though prison and the free world are different places, the way in which things happen good/bad and the way inwhich we our lives is the same.....We DO IT ONE DAY AT A TIME. There's too much help out here not to be able to make it. No, everything won't get turned around in 15 minutes, but eventually it'll all work out. He'll be fine and you will too. Just because you don't have all the answers right this moment doesn't mean the answers won't come. Time will take care of everything.
__________________
We're All In This Together
Reply With Quote
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Firebrand For This Useful Post:
Here4Us (04-14-2019), lizlizzie2 (04-15-2019), Lordbew/us (04-13-2019), Mama33 (04-19-2019), miamac (04-13-2019), MsFish (04-15-2019), sidewalker (04-14-2019), Subie24 (05-23-2019), tglsmom (04-13-2019)
  #8  
Old 04-13-2019, 01:46 PM
tglsmom's Avatar
tglsmom tglsmom is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 1,700
Thanks: 4,355
Thanked 4,049 Times in 1,258 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fbopnomore View Post
My guess is that the situation will turn out to be much less of a problem than you fear. Being an ex convict definitely gives him a lot of excuses as to why he will probably fail, but he also has the power to succeed, and even thrive as long as he keeps his eye on the prize, and never gives up.

My best advice is not to anticipate problems, but to quickly address any that actually surface.
This is great advice. I am seeing it firsthand with my son who has been out for nearly 3 months. We didn’t have time to anticipate his release and the problems that could come up since he was released unexpectedly in a matter of days. We didn’t have a choice or the time to stress about it. We tackled everything head on and accomplished so much in a very short amount to time. The problems will still arise, but I have confidence that we can handle them as they come along. Makes me kind of glad I didn’t know about his release beforehand. I would probably made a much bigger deal out of problems that I created than what they actually turned out to be!

For my son (at least so far!) there are NO excuses or any talk of failing. He knows that he created the situation he’s in and he’s willing to put in the hard work to get to where he wants to be. In addition to having the power to succeed, keeping his eye on the prize, and never giving up, I would add to never forget where you came from. That is a huge motivating and maybe the biggest factor for my son.
Reply With Quote
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to tglsmom For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (04-13-2019), Here4Us (04-14-2019), JadensMom127 (04-15-2019), lizlizzie2 (04-15-2019), Mama33 (04-19-2019), miamac (04-13-2019), sidewalker (04-14-2019), Subie24 (05-23-2019), trauma4us (04-20-2019)
  #9  
Old 04-15-2019, 01:00 PM
lizlizzie2's Avatar
lizlizzie2 lizlizzie2 is online now
Liz
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Arizona
Posts: 990
Thanks: 1,930
Thanked 1,577 Times in 610 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by miamac View Post
I'm not a parent, but a wife and I have the same fears for my husband when he is released (16+ years inside). He has a lot of hopes and dreams and they're all very realistic. No pie in the sky here. But as grounded as they are, I worry the world won't be as welcoming. In prison he has all the props a man could hope for. He stays out of trouble, so he gets kudos for that. He is a good worker, so he gets boosted up for that. He is a solid mentor in several programs so that makes him a little bigger fish in a rather small pond. But out here? The same level of effort is bare minimum and no one is running around putting gold stars on our chests for doing it. I fear he will feel the impact of a competitive job market where just doing your job isn't enough and feel defeated.

But I can't control any of that. We've talked about it. I remind him that there are no chronos here to go in your file (write up for doing a good job). No one sits us down once a year to tell us how well we're adulting. He knows, but as you said...knowing and feeling, right?
Miamac,

That is exactly it. My son has all the same props in prison and the real world doesn't give us gold stars or positive feedback. Without being an ex-con, exceeding expectations and being excellent at our everyday jobs, most of us don't get the credit we deserve. For them the bar will be set even higher.
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to lizlizzie2 For This Useful Post:
Mama33 (04-19-2019), miamac (04-15-2019), sidewalker (04-17-2019)
  #10  
Old 04-15-2019, 01:30 PM
lizlizzie2's Avatar
lizlizzie2 lizlizzie2 is online now
Liz
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Arizona
Posts: 990
Thanks: 1,930
Thanked 1,577 Times in 610 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by matrock130 View Post
I remember the days after my daughter got out. Looking for a job was difficult. Many a time I would meet her after a job search and she would be crying and asking what do they want from me...I tell them the truth and admit that I made a huge mistake but I need a job to get back on my feet. I just had to keep encouraging her to continue on and it would get better. A job would be there. 6 years later she is working in a law office as a paralegal and doing well. It was a long haul but persistence pays off. It will be hard but can be done. She worked at a nursery for a year right after prison outside. good luck and my prayers are with you.
Congrats to your daughter. I was a paralegal for 30 years, before disability forced me to quit. I loved the work, though not always the job or the attorneys.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to lizlizzie2 For This Useful Post:
Mama33 (04-19-2019)
  #11  
Old 04-19-2019, 05:25 PM
Mama33's Avatar
Mama33 Mama33 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: US
Posts: 117
Thanks: 683
Thanked 181 Times in 79 Posts
Default

Hang in there, Liz. Did I share the Surrender novena with You? If you’re Christian and want a good meditative prayer, you can google it and find it, and it has really helped me let go of some of the worry. I think it’s in our nature as mothers to worry so much. There’s even a guy who reads it on YouTube which is very soothing. I know it’s not an answer to problems, but I had to do something because I was driving myself crazy with worry. It’s difficult for me to admit that I can’t control things. I always try to be overly prepared, but no matter what I do, I can’t anticipate everything. With sons like ours, we’re probably always going to get curve balls. Hopefully they won’t be as bad as the last ones that sent them away. I’m holding you and your son in my heart.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mama33 For This Useful Post:
lizlizzie2 (04-22-2019), Subie24 (05-23-2019)
  #12  
Old 04-23-2019, 11:56 AM
mommatrip mommatrip is offline
Registered User
Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 170
Thanks: 71
Thanked 89 Times in 26 Posts
Default

Hey, Liz. My son did 3+ years in a state prison when he was 19. I was so afraid & nervous when he was released at almost 23years old. No experience, never lived on his own, really. I did some research & found helpful things to ease his adjustment form a VERY controlled life to "real" life. He moved in with us & his first 30 days were basically house arrest because of the program he was involved with to get early release. Little things, like knowing he might feel anxious out in public places where there would be lots of people. Sudden things were too much for him. Easing him into creating his own schedule, etc.

He is over 10 years out. It was hard, but if he could get in front of people: interviews in person vs online apps for everything from jobs to housing, it was much easier if he had the opportunity to tell his story & share his hopes, dreams & plans for his future. He is now happily married & that is past, over & done.

If I could say just 1 thing to encourage you about missing deadlines for school, etc...It would be that over time you will see that all these things that felt like roadblocks were there, not to thwart you, but to guide you & it will all be okay in the end. Best to you & yours
__________________
I will find what I seek when I seek with all my heart. I seek truth, beauty & joy, if only to give it all away.
Reply With Quote
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to mommatrip For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (04-23-2019), lizlizzie2 (04-26-2019), Mama33 (05-27-2019), sidewalker (04-24-2019), Subie24 (06-11-2019), trauma4us (04-24-2019)
  #13  
Old 05-17-2019, 06:33 PM
lizlizzie2's Avatar
lizlizzie2 lizlizzie2 is online now
Liz
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Arizona
Posts: 990
Thanks: 1,930
Thanked 1,577 Times in 610 Posts
Default One week

A week from today, we pick him up. Other than telling him we should be there at 745 am, no one told him where or what we should do. A FB group member gave me some direction, so I at least know which entrance of the city street, and which parking lot. It's a complex with 7 units, with separate entrances from the main road, along with multiple federal units along that same stretch.

I realize my son doesn't understand the complexity of driving with Interstates and city exits, along with how many prisons are there as he has been out of the prison only twice in the last 6 years - to go to the doctor and to be relocated via bus. When he called today he is asking one of the other inmates, my questions - is it the entrance past the one to your unit from the main city road, do I go inside somewhere, do I wait and they just let him walk out to meet us carrying his multiple boxes of stuff (he has about 5 including crafts and his school work and books). The best I got was which road to turn off of and wait in the dirt parking lot near a trailer. All these hoops I have jumped through for years, I can't believe they don't have at least one for me to jump through to pick him up.

I commented that with the flaky stories I have heard from people, what does an inmate do if their ride doesn't show up - they just stand in a dirt parking lot under the AZ sun until ... when? My son's response was I haven't seen anything compared to him. Today he saw a body, may be dead, may not; he wasn't sure.

Ok, setting aside how that makes us all feel - which I know isn't the first dead inmate he has seen since this started - I have noticed the past few months this tendency to "top" whatever I say. Several times I have wanted to tell him to shut it and listen. My thought is that this is another side effect of how to survive in prison - the "i know more than you" and "I can top that" attitude. One he definitely will need to shed in the employment interview world.
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to lizlizzie2 For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (05-18-2019), Mama33 (05-27-2019), maytayah (05-18-2019), miamac (05-17-2019), sidewalker (05-18-2019)
  #14  
Old 05-19-2019, 09:36 AM
uRmylife uRmylife is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Waiting
Posts: 304
Thanks: 217
Thanked 211 Times in 130 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lizlizzie2 View Post
A week from today, we pick him up. Other than telling him we should be there at 745 am, no one told him where or what we should do. A FB group member gave me some direction, so I at least know which entrance of the city street, and which parking lot. It's a complex with 7 units, with separate entrances from the main road, along with multiple federal units along that same stretch.

I realize my son doesn't understand the complexity of driving with Interstates and city exits, along with how many prisons are there as he has been out of the prison only twice in the last 6 years - to go to the doctor and to be relocated via bus. When he called today he is asking one of the other inmates, my questions - is it the entrance past the one to your unit from the main city road, do I go inside somewhere, do I wait and they just let him walk out to meet us carrying his multiple boxes of stuff (he has about 5 including crafts and his school work and books). The best I got was which road to turn off of and wait in the dirt parking lot near a trailer. All these hoops I have jumped through for years, I can't believe they don't have at least one for me to jump through to pick him up.

I commented that with the flaky stories I have heard from people, what does an inmate do if their ride doesn't show up - they just stand in a dirt parking lot under the AZ sun until ... when? My son's response was I haven't seen anything compared to him. Today he saw a body, may be dead, may not; he wasn't sure.

Ok, setting aside how that makes us all feel - which I know isn't the first dead inmate he has seen since this started - I have noticed the past few months this tendency to "top" whatever I say. Several times I have wanted to tell him to shut it and listen. My thought is that this is another side effect of how to survive in prison - the "i know more than you" and "I can top that" attitude. One he definitely will need to shed in the employment interview world.
Congrats on your son being released! Woohoo!!! I picked up my LO out of Tuscon last May. You want to go to the entrance/compound past the Whetstone entrance. The trailer you referenced is where you will pick your son up. The window opens at 7am if I recall correctly. You go to the window provide your ID and son's information and then go back to the parking lot to wait. They will bring your son via van from his complex. There are several vans that come so I kept thinking he was there and the bus would empty out and I would have to wait for the next one.

Hope all goes well!!! Congrats!
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to uRmylife For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (05-19-2019), lizlizzie2 (05-26-2019), Mama33 (05-27-2019), sidewalker (05-20-2019)
  #15  
Old 05-21-2019, 08:12 AM
sidewalker sidewalker is offline
CA, LASO, site sug. SUPER MOD

PTO Super Moderator Staff Superstar Winner 

Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: ca usa
Posts: 31,974
Thanks: 56,581
Thanked 30,419 Times in 15,210 Posts
Default

Its hard to be optimistic with your child when you saw how they ended up in prison, and we want to help them, but not too much. Its hard to NOT be disappointed and afraid they will revert back to the behaviors that landed them in trouble.


Lizzie, Im glad for you. It sure seems like you have a good, realistic view. We can all hope they do well, but alot of that is up to them.
All we can do is what we can/should do.
We still love them, regardless.


You have done and planned much toward showing him the way. Now is the time for small celebration. He's coming home!
I look forward to hearing how you all are doing.
__________________
My windows aren't dirty

That's my dog's nose art

Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to sidewalker For This Useful Post:
lizlizzie2 (05-26-2019), Mama33 (05-27-2019), Subie24 (06-11-2019)
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
So afraid for him.. ruhnaynay18711 New York General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat 9 08-29-2012 06:23 PM
Are any of you afraid to be happy? lurlur Coming Home 3 09-05-2007 01:49 AM
HAPPY BIRTHDAY alone&afraid 4/28 cysreese PTO Lounge 12 05-05-2006 08:42 PM
Be afraid... be very afraid-Brian's Mom from Florida Brian's Mom Introduce Yourself! 37 12-06-2003 08:49 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:42 AM.
Copyright © 2001- 2017 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics