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Prison Activism What's going on? How to become involved.

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  #76  
Old 03-18-2017, 04:33 AM
lareinemoi_3 lareinemoi_3 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fbopnomore View Post
Prison discipline is usually administered in a kangaroo court, so fairness to the inmates is rarely a consideration. I think Jim Croce was singing about prisons "don't spit into the wind or tug on Superman's cape."

In federal prisons, the inmates are marked as "complainers" in their administrative files, which never changes. Tell him to choose his battles carefully.
Thank you for the information I really appreciate it.
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  #77  
Old 03-18-2017, 08:41 PM
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Hey kind of new here. Wanted to know what can i do in order to help my husband out of SHU being that hes in there for no real reason

I dont know much about that, but I think your best option is to google a lawyer who specializes in "in-prison" criminal law. Most lawyers will offer one free consultation. They will likely have a better idea of your options. Also if the first one you contact is a jerk, call another. I had to do this in a different situation, it sucks, but eventually you will find a decent human who will do their best to advise you on your options.
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  #78  
Old 03-18-2017, 10:57 PM
lareinemoi_3 lareinemoi_3 is offline
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Originally Posted by Abi View Post
I dont know much about that, but I think your best option is to google a lawyer who specializes in "in-prison" criminal law. Most lawyers will offer one free consultation. They will likely have a better idea of your options. Also if the first one you contact is a jerk, call another. I had to do this in a different situation, it sucks, but eventually you will find a decent human who will do their best to advise you on your options.
Thank you I will try that and see if someone can help
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  #79  
Old 03-19-2017, 04:20 PM
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I have been dealing with my LO in Seg , he been in there since December , I am just going to continue to battle with the officials , especially as he has paper work to say he is out of seg but waiting on bed space , this has been since Jan , so now its just plain torture. I have been on the phone to the prison and their head quarters for 2 months , each time I do get a lil further but still.....
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  #80  
Old 06-26-2017, 08:55 AM
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Alaska is investigating some reforms, keeping an eye on safety. One is to provide a room designed not to drive humans crazy.

http://www.ktuu.com/content/news/DOC...428538183.html

Here's an example of the kind of thing they might change:
Quote:
"How it is now," said Busby. "An inmate can request segregation, and rather than argue with them, we'll let them go and we won't talk to them again for 30 days. That's when they're due for their next hearing. So we're going to put more checks in the way during the 30 days to get them to come out."
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  #81  
Old 07-20-2017, 09:25 AM
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North Carolina will try shorter sentences to SHU, limiting it to severe and moderate offenses, and requiring mental health to be considered.

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/new...162331683.html

Quote:
Robert Webster, a former state prison captain, said that while he has not yet read the new disciplinary policy, it sounds like a “double-edged sword.”
He’s concerned that the policy may send inmates the message that they will face few consequence if they refuse to obey orders. But he’s pleased that prisoners who break the rules will spend less time in solitary.
“It’s a proven fact that the longer they spend in segregation, the worse they get,” Webster said.
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  #82  
Old 07-29-2017, 01:34 AM
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Well, it sounded like a good idea to let people out for seven hours a day but chained to a desk to keep them from attacking anyone else.

https://www.propublica.org/article/o...causes-trouble

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Young adults began moving into the Enhanced Supervision Housing units in September 2016. Over the following six months, they were involved in six slashings in the units. Nearly 40 percent of all unit inmates suffered some form of injury. Rikers officials have long sought to bring down the number of slashings, fistfights and other violent episodes that plague the facility near daily. Neither the board nor the department provided specific details on how inmates smuggled weapons into the units or broke free of their shackles to harm one another.
I wonder why Colorado had better results.

One conclusion jumps out. Solitary should be reserved for dangerous people and not wasted on people who phone a call-in show, write books, or help other inmates with grievances. I can put a name to each of those.
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  #83  
Old 08-01-2017, 10:08 PM
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https://www.vera.org/projects/reduci...ion/learn-more is an interesting read. It's from people who pass along lessons learned by prison administrators who've safely reduced the use of solitary confinement.

Another one that describes what different facilities have tried and what the results were is at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/11/us...nfinement.html.
Quote:
What was surprising was what happened next. Instead of tightening restrictions further, prison officials loosened them.
They allowed most inmates out of their cells for hours each day. They built a basketball court and a group dining area. They put rehabilitation programs in place and let prisoners work their way to greater privileges.
Continue reading the main story
In response, the inmates became better behaved. Violence went down.
There's more. What it adds up to is, God help the fool who lets a real-life Hannibal Lecter out of his cell without handcuffs, but for most cases prolonged solitary just makes people even harder to manage.
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  #84  
Old 09-02-2017, 01:05 AM
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Here's some more information about Colorado's experiments. The source is biased of course.

Quote:
Colorado has “reclassified” hundreds of individuals out of solitary and into general population, and placed hundreds more in its step-down program. It has also removed from Administrative Segregation people diagnosed with serious mental illness, who traditionally make up a disproportionate number of those in solitary, and placed them in Residential Treatment Programs in separate prisons or units.
Quote:
In our interview, Raemisch asserted that the explosion in the use of solitary reflects an essential error in judgment on the part of corrections departments. Prolonged isolation is “used – and overused – to run a more efficient institution,” he said. “You shut the door on someone who’s creating a problem – end of problem. Or at least that was the thinking at the time. But it didn’t solve the problem. At best it suspended it, and it probably multiplied it.”
He continued, “Running an efficient institution is a noble goal, but we’ve lost sight of our mission. Our mission is community safety – period. And to do that we’ve got to ensure that we’re not putting people out worse than they were when they came in.”
The philosophy remains one of imposing consequences and not just isolating dangerous people.
Quote:
Individuals held in RH Max spend at least 22 hours a day in their cells. They have extremely limited access to televisions, books, phone calls and visits, and are not allowed to purchase food off the canteen
It gets more complicated when the inmates turn down opportunities:
Quote:
In his interview, Raemisch volunteered that the RTPs had experienced significant numbers of prisoners who refused to come out of their cells for either therapy or recreation, especially in the units’ early years. They had the right to refuse and were never forced, he said, but staff worked hard to find ways to engage people and “entice them out of their cells,” including art and other activities tailored to their interests, and the use of therapy dogs.
This high refusal rate, however, has become the focus of criticism leveled by advocates. According to the ACLU, prisoners on the RTPs have reported that many groups “are so poorly run and of so little utility that many prisoners avoid them.” Average refusal rates have actually been worsening over time, exceeding 75 percent between February and April 2015 at San Carlos.
From a long article at https://www.prisonlegalnews.org/news.../opening-door/ based largely on something from a year ago.
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  #85  
Old 09-10-2017, 07:50 PM
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For a look inside the SHU at Maine State Prison SHU and what it does to people check out this youtube video. It's not dramatised like most TV series and is quite point of fact. It's originally from Frontline on PBS.

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  #86  
Old 09-11-2017, 01:41 PM
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That documentary helped me understand the correctional officers' perspective
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  #87  
Old 09-17-2017, 08:27 AM
Roumelio Roumelio is offline
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The correctional officers perspective is interesting, you're going to try to kill me, we're not gonna let you out. From a family members perspective its a design, eventually you break someone down so you can rebuild them. But even this doesn't happen sometime, sometimes people go mad instead of having their views changed and become more dangerous when you go about trying to put them back out on the street.

Given that the majority of felons will end up back on the street at some point it doesn't make good sense to make them even more dangerous than what they came into the system but it happens.

The recognition that it happens is a good start.
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