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It's Not All Bad Behind the Walls Let's talk about the good things that happen in prison. The correctional officers that have helped us, etc.

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  #1  
Old 11-08-2009, 08:43 PM
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Default A little reminder for inmates with tough CO's...

Someone told me this one time and I liked it a lot.

A CO is at the highest point in his life, you are at the lowest, and you are at the same facility. 'Nuff said.
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Old 12-28-2009, 03:15 AM
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Words of wisdom. Thanks for the post.
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Old 01-21-2010, 03:18 PM
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Awesome
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Old 01-30-2010, 05:04 PM
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I like that. I'll have to remind my friend of that.
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Old 01-31-2010, 09:34 AM
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Keep in mind though that COs have to learn the same as prisoners. Respect is given as it is earned. We are here to do a job and not to take things personal. Inmates were sentenced by a judge as punishment. Our job is NOT to punish but to ensure safety and security for ALL. We simply want inmates to follow the rules. When there is resistence to following rules, we have to get tougher. Rules exist in society the same as in prison. We ALL have to follow rules. It is all about communication and how things are communicated.


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Originally Posted by helping hand View Post
Someone told me this one time and I liked it a lot.

A CO is at the highest point in his life, you are at the lowest, and you are at the same facility. 'Nuff said.
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Old 02-08-2010, 08:42 PM
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Actually this may offend some but..... when i worked in a lawyers office anyone who worked in corrections was looked at as criminal justice rejects. They all would joke that those who dont cut it in Police Academy just go become C.Os!!!! My sister is a CJ Major and even she has that opinion.!!

I know i was offended as its my goal to be a Correctional Facility Nurse!!
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Old 02-10-2010, 02:52 AM
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there are good cops and there are bad cops. i do agree with the saying you have to earn respect but not while your being treated dirty. inmate or not!!!!!
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Old 02-10-2010, 06:55 AM
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I have spoken with many police officers and they wouldn't want our job. When things get tough on the streets, they can retreat. Behind the way, we have no choice, we have to stay and deal with it. We are not rejects and anyone with that opinion should work behind the wall to see it and understand it, then they can form an opinion. You keep your dream and become a correctional facility nurse. You are much needed. We do not choose our careers, they choose us. It is tough work and takes a special person.



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Actually this may offend some but..... when i worked in a lawyers office anyone who worked in corrections was looked at as criminal justice rejects. They all would joke that those who dont cut it in Police Academy just go become C.Os!!!! My sister is a CJ Major and even she has that opinion.!!

I know i was offended as its my goal to be a Correctional Facility Nurse!!
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Old 02-10-2010, 07:01 AM
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there are good cops and there are bad cops. i do agree with the saying you have to earn respect but not while your being treated dirty. inmate or not!!!!!
You are absolutely correct. Knowing how both sides work helps to change that relationship. A majority of inmates think we are dirty and the reality is, only some of us our dirty. Being incarcerated makes it very difficult and is not a normal circumstance to live in breeding anger, humiliation, defeat, and the feeling of no way out. This does not help the relationship at all on either end because frustrations grow on both sides. Good cops are out there and we do our best to treat all inmates humanely, even when we have bodily fluids thrown at us for personal enjoyment. A good cop knows not to take things personnally and to do our best make confinement just a bit more pleasant and humane.
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Old 02-26-2010, 02:11 AM
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... A CO is at the highest point in his life, you are at the lowest, and you are at the same facility....
priceless!!!!!!!!
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Old 02-26-2010, 02:45 AM
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love it!!! imma have to tell my man about this one
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Old 03-07-2010, 02:40 PM
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Thank you for your input. Sadly I feel maybe no all COS feel as you do.

I agree that it is imperitive for inmates to follow the rules, but given the politics in prison, what are your thoughts on some changes that could be made to bring more peace within the prisons among inmates?











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Originally Posted by fedofficer View Post
Keep in mind though that COs have to learn the same as prisoners. Respect is given as it is earned. We are here to do a job and not to take things personal. Inmates were sentenced by a judge as punishment. Our job is NOT to punish but to ensure safety and security for ALL. We simply want inmates to follow the rules. When there is resistence to following rules, we have to get tougher. Rules exist in society the same as in prison. We ALL have to follow rules. It is all about communication and how things are communicated.
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Old 03-08-2010, 12:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fedofficer View Post
You are absolutely correct. Knowing how both sides work helps to change that relationship. A majority of inmates think we are dirty and the reality is, only some of us our dirty. Being incarcerated makes it very difficult and is not a normal circumstance to live in breeding anger, humiliation, defeat, and the feeling of no way out. This does not help the relationship at all on either end because frustrations grow on both sides. Good cops are out there and we do our best to treat all inmates humanely, even when we have bodily fluids thrown at us for personal enjoyment. A good cop knows not to take things personnally and to do our best make confinement just a bit more pleasant and humane.
I will say, from 1st hand experience, there are def more good then bad COs. I watched the ones who were good--try to show some kindness and decency to inmates--then get it thrown in their face by being falsely accused of improper behavior. They then learn it is actually safer for them to be "assholes" as opposed to being decent. As far as it being their "highest point"--sorry, I beg to differ. Now here in WV county jails--yes, as the requirements for being a CO are EXTREMELY minimal. Heck, I can be one right now--was even offered a position when I walked out the doors. But as for our friend here, a Fed CO is a whole different story--as it is for COs in most other states. COs are people too--no different then us. I use to remind them on a daily basis that EVERYONE, including them, was only one step away from wearing orange like me. And for the most part I will say they knew that and were pretty decent.
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Old 09-24-2010, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fedofficer View Post
Keep in mind though that COs have to learn the same as prisoners. Respect is given as it is earned. We are here to do a job and not to take things personal. Inmates were sentenced by a judge as punishment. Our job is NOT to punish but to ensure safety and security for ALL. We simply want inmates to follow the rules. When there is resistence to following rules, we have to get tougher. Rules exist in society the same as in prison. We ALL have to follow rules. It is all about communication and how things are communicated.
Thats what my hubby says He doesnt see the point in making things worse then they are?! OMG, talking about him just makes me think about him, miss him and want a hug, kiss and some snuggles
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Old 09-30-2010, 12:08 AM
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Babe and I was just saying something similar to this.It was in reference to how some of the guards are always angry. I pointed out that they spend most of their days with inmates he should understand.Babe replied "If you don't have love you don't have nothing."
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Old 09-30-2010, 08:20 AM
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This is so true. I have been a corrections officer for almost 3 years. And as long as i'm given respect then i will give respect back. But there are some inmates that automatically have the attitude that it's the officers fault that they are in prison...so not true. I agree with what you said, we are there to ensure that the public is safe bul also that the inmates are safe as well. We aren't there to punish....being there is the punishment. So if your guy is respectful, than you have nothing to worry about!!!
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Old 02-09-2011, 02:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fedofficer View Post
You are absolutely correct. Knowing how both sides work helps to change that relationship. A majority of inmates think we are dirty and the reality is, only some of us our dirty. Being incarcerated makes it very difficult and is not a normal circumstance to live in breeding anger, humiliation, defeat, and the feeling of no way out. This does not help the relationship at all on either end because frustrations grow on both sides. Good cops are out there and we do our best to treat all inmates humanely, even when we have bodily fluids thrown at us for personal enjoyment. A good cop knows not to take things personnally and to do our best make confinement just a bit more pleasant and humane.
ANd I wish there were more like you in the state of Ohio. Anywhere actually.
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Old 06-04-2011, 01:57 PM
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Rules are made to be broken.
If everyone agreed about something, there would be no need for a rule.
I broke a number of rules when I was in prison. Sometimes I got caught and had to accept the consequences. But that was OK. I knew what I was doing.
I got along well with the COs and truly didn't mind the extra duty that I was given to do.
I was the one who chose to break the rules.
But I tried never to cause harm to others. Sometimes, that meant that I broke the rules so that I would not cause harm to others.

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Keep in mind though that COs have to learn the same as prisoners. Respect is given as it is earned. We are here to do a job and not to take things personal. Inmates were sentenced by a judge as punishment. Our job is NOT to punish but to ensure safety and security for ALL. We simply want inmates to follow the rules. When there is resistence to following rules, we have to get tougher. Rules exist in society the same as in prison. We ALL have to follow rules. It is all about communication and how things are communicated.
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:08 AM
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Default I Found Compassion From a CO

In a texas female unit, after a year and half there, a CO came in my dorm. It was loud, a Friday night late night and he got our attention with these words: "I am not here to make your punishment more than it already is. I judge you not, only follow my rules and expect you to do the same, in here or out. You are already suffering and I won't make it worse, work with me to make that possible." That was the first time I breathed, believed again in my own humanity. Though I will not say most COs are just people trying to do their job, I do believe so many love the power they have there that does not exist in their personal life (how many of us have that?), I will say it only takes one to change an offenders behavior, resentment, anger and outlook. Thank you and every other CO that tries.
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Keep in mind though that COs have to learn the same as prisoners. Respect is given as it is earned. We are here to do a job and not to take things personal. Inmates were sentenced by a judge as punishment. Our job is NOT to punish but to ensure safety and security for ALL. We simply want inmates to follow the rules. When there is resistence to following rules, we have to get tougher. Rules exist in society the same as in prison. We ALL have to follow rules. It is all about communication and how things are communicated.
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Old 06-24-2011, 03:59 AM
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It is hard to be on either side of the fence. Some inmates are bitter and take it out on co's. Some co's are angry and take it out on inmates. It is a dysfunctional family with some caught in the middle, trying to do the right thing. There is no normal relationship in this setting. I pray for all of them to learn to deal with the situation the best way possible. We, the families can help with our attitudes and by following the rules when we enter those doors.
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Old 06-24-2011, 07:37 AM
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A question that kind of fits this topic:

I have noticed that the requirements to even be a CO are getting more demanding, for example many states are looking at people with at least associates degrees, some kind of at least security experince, etc. The question is, does anyone see an improvement in the quality of COs performance on the inside?

Just wandering.
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Old 07-07-2011, 05:15 PM
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This is true fedofficer... but if everything was sunshine and rainbows in prison like you want to portray it that would be the case... there are troublemakers in prison I'll admit but there are also good guys who just want to get out... just like there are good officers who act the way you say and then there are the @$$holes who want to "exercise their power" and treat everyone like they're pond scum... even the good ones... believe me my guy is one and has seen several "fed officers" like this...


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Keep in mind though that COs have to learn the same as prisoners. Respect is given as it is earned. We are here to do a job and not to take things personal. Inmates were sentenced by a judge as punishment. Our job is NOT to punish but to ensure safety and security for ALL. We simply want inmates to follow the rules. When there is resistence to following rules, we have to get tougher. Rules exist in society the same as in prison. We ALL have to follow rules. It is all about communication and how things are communicated.
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Old 07-07-2011, 05:24 PM
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But only a good CO can bring out the best in an inmate.

Most only want respect and what they duly have coming to them. That is not asking alot, but depending on the situation, it could be a fruitless fight.

So despite who is "higher or lower" on the totem pole, its about a CO knowing his place just as it is for an inmate knowing his.

It all boils down to respect and what is just and fair.










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Originally Posted by helping hand View Post
Someone told me this one time and I liked it a lot.

A CO is at the highest point in his life, you are at the lowest, and you are at the same facility. 'Nuff said.
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Last edited by Tuesday123; 07-07-2011 at 05:28 PM..
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Old 07-31-2011, 08:29 AM
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I read a comment from a mother that lost his son in prison and the story had me in tears. Her son 29 was sick while in prison, his mother knew he needed surgery and med because he had several surgeries before; to cut the story short, the young man died and his death was under investigation; the mother was told her son died of illness, luckily the boys cellmate called the mother and told her that a CO kicked the boy (her son) on the ribs because he wouldn't get up when the CO had asked him too, the boy couldn't get up because he nedded medical attention and was very ill, the boy had several bruces on the rib area from not just one kick but several... My point to this is that no matter if there are good or bad CO's they all have the same reputation of being @$$h*le$... this is a perfect example!

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Old 08-23-2011, 10:22 PM
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There are good and bad people everywhere. I would consider myself a great officer and I also agree with the "give respect to get respect." I have always given respect to the offenders and majority of the time I get it right back. They all have good and bad days...what more could we expect? They are human and need to be treated as that.

No one should look down on CO's...we work very hard at what we do. I am not there to be a power over anyone. I chose the prison system because I like to help people and I am good at that. I enjoy people and I hope that I can be a positive influence to those around me. I would love to get into counseling at some point in time, but I wanted to be a CO first to get a first hand idea of what goes on in thier work days. But I will honestly say I enjoy it most days. It is different everyday and you deal with different people and personalities everyday.

I feel for the family and friends who have loved ones incarcerated. Always have hope and always let them know you care.
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