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It's Not All Bad Behind the Walls Let's talk about the good things that happen in prison. The correctional officers that have helped us, etc.

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  #51  
Old 04-16-2010, 11:28 AM
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wow, this is such a sad post. what is with all the hating? what happened to "judge not lest ye be judged"?
imo
lumping all cops in as being evil would be like lumping all inmates as being evil. same with lumping them all as good. IMO the uniform does not make the person. if you are going to judge a group of people as all good or all bad you might as well lable yourself as crazy. thats is what i hear most for loving and standing by my inmate. omg your dating(or have a family member whatnot) an inmate! they should all rot in h3ll. they've commited such and such crimes. your stupid/crazy. why not take it a step further. your a blonde, you must be dumber than a fence post. that red head over there is definitly a tempramental b*tch. i thought this forum was supposed to be about good stuff. not mud slinging.
anyways this is just my opinion.
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  #52  
Old 04-16-2010, 11:47 AM
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Well said lisamarie!!
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Old 04-16-2010, 04:59 PM
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There are inummerable studies showing that police officers and prison guards often develop what is described as a dual personality. One personality for their family, people they date, etc. and another entirely different personality when they are dealing with inmates or suspects. The subject nicknamed 'John Wayne' in the Stanford Prison Experiment comes to mind.

That one's father or uncle, husband or boyfriend was an officer or guard and was kind and compassionate to you does not mean they are kind and compassionate across the board. In fact, data shows the exact opposite. Worse, they are rarely aware of it. The sadists are aware of it of course, and are often the ones that the 'good' cops call the 'bad' cops - but the job effects everyone who takes it, only the degree to which it effects them changes.

Too, I take issue with the idea that these cops risk their life every day for us. Police work isn't anywhere near the most dangerous job in the country and I never seem to hear people praising the 7-11 worker for putting their life on the line for us every day despite the fact that their job is much more dangerous. Unlike prisoners, cops tried to put themselves in this position. They chose police work or guard duty because that's what they wanted to do; it wasn't for me that they took the job. They wanted the gun, the power that comes with a badge and entry into the largest violent gang in the country. They may have also wanted to help people. I just don't believe that helping people remains their primary focus for long.

While anecdotal evidence is the weakest form of evidence, there seems to be no shortage of it here and so let me add to the craziness...

Two years ago, on May 2nd, I had a heart attack and there was no one to take me to the hospital. Unfortunately, I didn't know where the hospital was but I did know where the cop shop was - I went straight there. Seven times that cop asked me how many drugs I had taken that night while I begged for directions to the hospital. Seven times. "Chest pains huh? You think you had a heart attack? Well then, you better tell me what you were taking so we can get on with getting you some medical help. Cocaine? Meth? What was it?" I had another heart attack during this interrogation which lasted 45 minutes.

Do I think all cops are like this? I've never been given a reason by a cop to think otherwise but I assume there must be a couple somewhere. Like a friend of mine once said, "I'm not saying there aren't good cops out there, but you'll probably die before you find one."
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Old 04-16-2010, 08:54 PM
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There are inummerable studies showing that police officers and prison guards often develop what is described as a dual personality. If you consider the fact that they see horrific scenes that none of us will ever (thankfully) see, I believe there is a suitable reason they have these personalities. If you are lucky enough to work in a daycare, church, school or any other 'typically' positive environment, flip the switch for a minute. Imagine your job being one of the most negative work environments ever. One personality for their family, people they date, etc. and another entirely different personality when they are dealing with inmates or suspects. Imagine, for a moment, going to a home to serve some civil papers or serve a warrant and seeing young children living in a filthy situation. An hour later, you pull over a drunk driver who happens to be drunk and 8 months pregnant. Your last call should be something easy: truancy, but you go to the home of the child who hasn't been in school for days and see him and his mother lying in the same bed with a water bong next to the mattress on the floor. The subject nicknamed 'John Wayne' in the Stanford Prison Experiment comes to mind.

That one's father or uncle, husband or boyfriend was an officer or guard and was kind and compassionate to you does not mean they are kind and compassionate across the board. In fact, data shows the exact opposite. Please provide a credible link. Worse, they are rarely aware of it. And that's different than the man who works a 9-5 at Orkin and comes home to continue the same negative habits? The sadists are aware of it of course, and are often the ones that the 'good' cops call the 'bad' cops - but the job effects everyone who takes it, only the degree to which it effects them changes. Agreed!

Too, I take issue with the idea that these cops risk their life every day for us. Police work isn't anywhere near the most dangerous job in the country Wow! May I suggest calling your local police department to request to ride along with them during a shift? If so, make sure it's during early August and make it an Afternoon type shift. and I never seem to hear people praising the 7-11 worker for putting their life on the line for us every day despite the fact that their job is much more dangerous. Well, I will be the first to thank the 7-11 employee who pulls someone over for swearving over the center line and walks up to the car not knowing what could be in the car. More realistic: I'll fully respect the 7-11 employee when he has the capabilities to go out and serve customers in the parking lot and while the customer digs in his/her glove box for cash, I hope it's not a lethal weapon. Unlike prisoners, cops tried to put themselves in this position. They chose police work or guard duty because that's what they wanted to do; Can't argue with you there. it wasn't for me that they took the job. They wanted the gun, the power that comes with a badge and entry into the largest violent gang in the country. They may have also wanted to help people. I just don't believe that helping people remains their primary focus for long.

While anecdotal evidence is the weakest form of evidence, there seems to be no shortage of it here and so let me add to the craziness... What is your solution? No law enforcement? Not picking a fight...picking a realistic debate

Two years ago, on May 2nd, I had a heart attack and there was no one to take me to the hospital. Unfortunately, I didn't know where the hospital was but I did know where the cop shop was - I went straight there. Seven times that cop asked me how many drugs I had taken that night while I begged for directions to the hospital. Seven times. "Chest pains huh? You think you had a heart attack? Well then, you better tell me what you were taking so we can get on with getting you some medical help. Cocaine? Meth? What was it?" I had another heart attack during this interrogation which lasted 45 minutes. I'm sorry you went through that but I don't know the details of your situation...but I've heard many stories of my relatives (who are first responders) who have saved many lives. My love got shot and drove into a police department bleeding to death and they saved his life...THEN then locked him up for 16 years. But, I'm more grateful he's alive.

Do I think all cops are like this? I've never been given a reason by a cop to think otherwise but I assume there must be a couple somewhere. Like a friend of mine once said, "I'm not saying there aren't good cops out there, but you'll probably die before you find one."
I'm fairly certain my efforts to make you see things from the other side are fruitless, but at least I tried.
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  #55  
Old 04-17-2010, 02:52 AM
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There are inummerable studies showing that police officers and prison guards often develop what is described as a dual personality. If you consider the fact that they see horrific scenes that none of us will ever (thankfully) see, I believe there is a suitable reason they have these personalities.If you are lucky enough to work in a daycare, church, school or any other 'typically' positive environment, flip the switch for a minute. Imagine your job being one of the most negative work environments ever.

I’m a combat veteran; no cop, in the performance of his duties, has ever seen or experienced more horror than I have. The media calls certain desperate and crime-ridden areas of this country ‘war zones’ but I assure you they are not. I have had more of my unit die in a single day than any cop will see in his entire department in a career. I receive no special dispensation for my personality; I am held to the same standards as the rest of the citizenry. I do not have to imagine what the most negative work environment ever looks like; I lived it.

One personality for their family, people they date, etc. and another entirely different personality when they are dealing with inmates or suspects. Imagine, for a moment, going to a home to serve some civil papers or serve a warrant and seeing young children living in a filthy situation. An hour later, you pull over a drunk driver who happens to be drunk and 8 months pregnant. Your last call should be something easy: truancy, but you go to the home of the child who hasn't been in school for days and see him and his mother lying in the same bed with a water bong next to the mattress on the floor. The subject nicknamed 'John Wayne' in the Stanford Prison Experiment comes to mind.

Imagine listening to the mocking laugh of the man as he killed two of your closest friends. Now imagine capturing him and treating him humanely and in accordance with the Geneva Convention, simply because it is the right thing to do. I don’t have to imagine.

That one's father or uncle, husband or boyfriend was an officer or guard and was kind and compassionate to you does not mean they are kind and compassionate across the board. In fact, data shows the exact opposite.
Please provide a credible link.

http://news-service.stanford.edu/pr/97/970108prisonexp.html

Worse, they are rarely aware of it. And that's different than the man who works a 9-5 at Orkin and comes home to continue the same negative habits?

Yes. The job breeds abuse of power; working at Orkin doesn’t. While military service can also breed abuse of power, it often doesn’t because there is often a level or respect for the enemy – if not in politics or philosophy, in skill. Police and especially guards, very seldom show any respect for those they stand opposed to.

The sadists are aware of it of course, and are often the ones that the 'good' cops call the 'bad' cops - but the job affects everyone who takes it, only the degree to which it affects them changes. Agreed!

Too, I take issue with the idea that these cops risk their life every day for us. Police work isn't anywhere near the most dangerous job in the country
Wow! May I suggest calling your local police department to request to ride along with them during a shift? If so, make sure it's during early August and make it an Afternoon type shift.

I have no desire to spend a moment with a cop that I don’t have to however; it is also unnecessary. The most dangerous job in the United States is fishermen at 104.4 deaths per 100,000 followed by timber cutters at 101 deaths per 100,000. Cops are not on the top ten list nor are guards. In fact, cops come in at a relatively low 16.6 deaths per 100,000 and guards at 11.2 per 100,000. Of those, only 27% of police deaths are caused by homicide, 16% are traffic accidents. By contrast and for comparison sake, farmers come in at 5.1 per 100,000.
http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfar0020.pdf


and I never seem to hear people praising the 7-11 worker for putting their life on the line for us every day despite the fact that their job is much more dangerous. Well, I will be the first to thank the 7-11 employee who pulls someone over for swearving over the center line and walks up to the car not knowing what could be in the car. More realistic: I'll fully respect the 7-11 employee when he has the capabilities to go out and serve customers in the parking lot and while the customer digs in his/her glove box for cash, I hope it's not a lethal weapon.

The 7-11 employee doesn’t go up to the customer, the customer comes up to him while he or she stands there and wonders if the customer is going to pull out a wallet or a weapon.

Unlike prisoners, cops tried to put themselves in this position. They chose police work or guard duty because that's what they wanted to do; Can't argue with you there. it wasn't for me that they took the job. They wanted the gun, the power that comes with a badge and entry into the largest violent gang in the country. They may have also wanted to help people. I just don't believe that helping people remains their primary focus for long.

While anecdotal evidence is the weakest form of evidence, there seems to be no shortage of it here and so let me add to the craziness...
What is your solution? No law enforcement? Not picking a fight...picking a realistic debate

Well, I’d be okay with that, though I know that this is not a realistic solution. I do know that my family and loved ones would be safer if their safety was in my hands. Okay, a realistic solution…compulsory and continuous counseling as a condition of employment. We know that there is psychological damage to people in these positions; serve them and society by trying to mitigate the damage.

Two years ago, on May 2nd, I had a heart attack and there was no one to take me to the hospital. Unfortunately, I didn't know where the hospital was but I did know where the cop shop was - I went straight there. Seven times that cop asked me how many drugs I had taken that night while I begged for directions to the hospital. Seven times. "Chest pains huh? You think you had a heart attack? Well then, you better tell me what you were taking so we can get on with getting you some medical help. Cocaine? Meth? What was it?" I had another heart attack during this interrogation which lasted 45 minutes.
I'm sorry you went through that but I don't know the details of your situation...but I've heard many stories of my relatives (who are first responders) who have saved many lives. My love got shot and drove into a police department bleeding to death and they saved his life...THEN then locked him up for 16 years. But, I'm more grateful he's alive.

The details are simple. I drove into the lot, parked legally, knocked on the door and asked for directions to a hospital. I was coming from work. I was not drinking, not on drugs. I did not yell, scream or order him to help me. I asked politely.


I'm fairly certain my efforts to make you see things from the other side are fruitless, but at least I tried.

Likewise. I know that there is nothing I can say and don't want to get into a fruitless argument any more than you but you gave thoughtful replies and I wanted to return the favor. Peace.
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Old 04-18-2010, 06:18 PM
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There are inummerable studies showing that police officers and prison guards often develop what is described as a dual personality. If you consider the fact that they see horrific scenes that none of us will ever (thankfully) see, I believe there is a suitable reason they have these personalities.If you are lucky enough to work in a daycare, church, school or any other 'typically' positive environment, flip the switch for a minute. Imagine your job being one of the most negative work environments ever.

I’m a combat veteran; no cop, in the performance of his duties, has ever seen or experienced more horror than I have. The media calls certain desperate and crime-ridden areas of this country ‘war zones’ but I assure you they are not. I have had more of my unit die in a single day than any cop will see in his entire department in a career. I receive no special dispensation for my personality; I am held to the same standards as the rest of the citizenry. I do not have to imagine what the most negative work environment ever looks like; I lived it. First, thank you for serving. Second, no one forced you into that temporary occupation. I'm not here to defend first responders because I realize there is a small sum of them who do it for shits and gigggles. What I'm here to try to state is that not all police officers are in it for the glory. I also, for the record, wasn't trying to make this into a "he puts his life on the line more than others" type thread.

One personality for their family, people they date, etc. and another entirely different personality when they are dealing with inmates or suspects. Imagine, for a moment, going to a home to serve some civil papers or serve a warrant and seeing young children living in a filthy situation. An hour later, you pull over a drunk driver who happens to be drunk and 8 months pregnant. Your last call should be something easy: truancy, but you go to the home of the child who hasn't been in school for days and see him and his mother lying in the same bed with a water bong next to the mattress on the floor. The subject nicknamed 'John Wayne' in the Stanford Prison Experiment comes to mind. It still shows lack of compassion.

Imagine listening to the mocking laugh of the man as he killed two of your closest friends. Now imagine capturing him and treating him humanely and in accordance with the Geneva Convention, simply because it is the right thing to do. I don’t have to imagine. I just saw the movie Brothers and though I'd do the same thing if I were in his position.

That one's father or uncle, husband or boyfriend was an officer or guard and was kind and compassionate to you does not mean they are kind and compassionate across the board. In fact, data shows the exact opposite.
Please provide a credible link.

http://news-service.stanford.edu/pr/97/970108prisonexp.html

Worse, they are rarely aware of it. And that's different than the man who works a 9-5 at Orkin and comes home to continue the same negative habits?

Yes. The job breeds abuse of power; working at Orkin doesn’t. While military service can also breed abuse of power, it often doesn’t because there is often a level or respect for the enemy – if not in politics or philosophy, in skill. Police and especially guards, very seldom show any respect for those they stand opposed to.

The sadists are aware of it of course, and are often the ones that the 'good' cops call the 'bad' cops - but the job affects everyone who takes it, only the degree to which it affects them changes. Agreed!

Too, I take issue with the idea that these cops risk their life every day for us. Police work isn't anywhere near the most dangerous job in the country
Wow! May I suggest calling your local police department to request to ride along with them during a shift? If so, make sure it's during early August and make it an Afternoon type shift.

I have no desire to spend a moment with a cop that I don’t have to however; it is also unnecessary. The most dangerous job in the United States is fishermen at 104.4 deaths per 100,000 followed by timber cutters at 101 deaths per 100,000. Cops are not on the top ten list nor are guards. In fact, cops come in at a relatively low 16.6 deaths per 100,000 and guards at 11.2 per 100,000. Of those, only 27% of police deaths are caused by homicide, 16% are traffic accidents. By contrast and for comparison sake, farmers come in at 5.1 per 100,000.
http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfar0020.pdf


and I never seem to hear people praising the 7-11 worker for putting their life on the line for us every day despite the fact that their job is much more dangerous. Well, I will be the first to thank the 7-11 employee who pulls someone over for swearving over the center line and walks up to the car not knowing what could be in the car. More realistic: I'll fully respect the 7-11 employee when he has the capabilities to go out and serve customers in the parking lot and while the customer digs in his/her glove box for cash, I hope it's not a lethal weapon.

The 7-11 employee doesn’t go up to the customer, the customer comes up to him while he or she stands there and wonders if the customer is going to pull out a wallet or a weapon.

Unlike prisoners, cops tried to put themselves in this position. They chose police work or guard duty because that's what they wanted to do; Can't argue with you there. it wasn't for me that they took the job. They wanted the gun, the power that comes with a badge and entry into the largest violent gang in the country. They may have also wanted to help people. I just don't believe that helping people remains their primary focus for long.

While anecdotal evidence is the weakest form of evidence, there seems to be no shortage of it here and so let me add to the craziness...
What is your solution? No law enforcement? Not picking a fight...picking a realistic debate

Well, I’d be okay with that, though I know that this is not a realistic solution. I do know that my family and loved ones would be safer if their safety was in my hands. Okay, a realistic solution…compulsory and continuous counseling as a condition of employment. We know that there is psychological damage to people in these positions; serve them and society by trying to mitigate the damage.

Two years ago, on May 2nd, I had a heart attack and there was no one to take me to the hospital. Unfortunately, I didn't know where the hospital was but I did know where the cop shop was - I went straight there. Seven times that cop asked me how many drugs I had taken that night while I begged for directions to the hospital. Seven times. "Chest pains huh? You think you had a heart attack? Well then, you better tell me what you were taking so we can get on with getting you some medical help. Cocaine? Meth? What was it?" I had another heart attack during this interrogation which lasted 45 minutes.
I'm sorry you went through that but I don't know the details of your situation...but I've heard many stories of my relatives (who are first responders) who have saved many lives. My love got shot and drove into a police department bleeding to death and they saved his life...THEN then locked him up for 16 years. But, I'm more grateful he's alive.

The details are simple. I drove into the lot, parked legally, knocked on the door and asked for directions to a hospital. I was coming from work. I was not drinking, not on drugs. I did not yell, scream or order him to help me. I asked politely.


I'm fairly certain my efforts to make you see things from the other side are fruitless, but at least I tried.

Likewise. I know that there is nothing I can say and don't want to get into a fruitless argument any more than you but you gave thoughtful replies and I wanted to return the favor. Peace.
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Old 04-18-2010, 07:08 PM
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Today I had to move 2 inmates into the unit. Both were of the same race. As an Evil and corrupt CO, I figured I would put the Older and Larger (260 Lb) man into a cell with another similarly sized man. I put the younger and smaller (160 LB) man into another cell with a shorter but nearly the same sized man. As I only had the two beds to work with, I was thinking that these two men would have a realistic chance of defending themselves if there was an issue between the new cell mates. I'm grateful that you have enlightened me to the error of my ways, and that I should not have applied what I honestly thought would be an intelligent decision. I really should not have considered the safety of the inmates, as it is easier to simply allow them to fight and see how many others can get involved. Send one or both of them to the hospital to be patched up. It would not even be like when I had to stop 2 inmates from killing another inmate (while I was unarmed) even though the guy I was saving was a convicted cop killer. I apologize for not following up on the status of these 2 inmates, but I had to go and stop the four gangbangers from fighting in another pod before someone got hurt. 2 hours later of doing overtime of which I do not get paid for, and thankfully do not have any new injuries,(My Insurence does not start until I pay $5000.00 up and this is the state's insurence)
Maybe, I am in the wrong line of work. I follow the rules, use judgement, talk to the inmates about their wants and needs,and sometimes we just talk, about music, politics, religion, etc... I deal with poeple most of who can not see that i am trying to help them. I have staff that are far less willing to work as hard as I do. I do this type of work because I can. NOT because I like it. I try to do my job well, not for advancement, but because it is a part of myvalues. I eat the same food that os serfverd in the chow hall. I do not worriy .This is whst an omore i you want I my donot
I thank you for this post. There are good cops out there and that's amazing! Seriously thank you for taking your job seriously. However unfortunately, more and more it has been seen and noted that cops have become some of the biggest criminals. I think when people talk bad on "Cops" it's out of resentment that cops get a slap on the hand when they kill, or beat someone, or damn near hit you with their crazy out of control driving ext. I can't speak for all but personally I have seen both family members and aquaintances take advantage of their title and badge rights. It isn't the easiest job (depending on if you're one of those few that actually does their job PROPERLY) however it's not one you have to get an education for or anything so I don't see the reasoning on why they should get paid more, to be honest. If a higher pay is desirable perhaps furthering their education still within the criminal justice field would be desirable. However I will say this I personally have seen guys go into a police academy for the reason that it is easier in comparison to other fields that aquire the same pay. It's not fair to judge all cops based on most cops or personal experiences but it's not fair to call someone a "thug" or "gangster" or "low life" or whatever else based on their criminal record, you never know what brought that particular person to commit that particular crime, and further more a "cop" that commits those same crimes gets leave with pay or at most loses his title. I guess this post wont solve to much, but perhaps we should judge less in order to expect less judgement.
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Old 07-15-2010, 09:44 PM
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i am not fond of a certain one also he lied swiae to my face that night they took my man tried getting stuff on him that was not true but can not judge all by ones choice
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Old 07-15-2010, 09:45 PM
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i am not fond of a certain one also he lied twice to my face that night they took my man tried getting stuff on him that was not true but can not judge all by ones choice
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