Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > CAPITAL PUNISHMENT > Death Row & Capital Punishment Discussions
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Death Row & Capital Punishment Discussions Discussions relating to inmates on Death Row / facing capital punishment in the United States and abroad that don't fit into any of the other forums

View Poll Results: Which do you think is a tougher penalty?
Life in prison 252 56.25%
Death penalty 196 43.75%
Voters: 448. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #151  
Old 11-02-2015, 03:07 AM
+VERDE+'s Avatar
+VERDE+ +VERDE+ is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Italy
Posts: 601
Thanks: 718
Thanked 341 Times in 208 Posts
Default

Both life imprisonment and the death penalty suck. But in my opinion the death penalty is the closest thing to hell I can imagine. I have a pen priend currently held in Polunsky Unit in Texas, he has told me something about the living conditions there and they are DREADFUL. Daniel Lopez was executed in August this year because he was tired of his living conditions in death row and decided to just drop his appeals and go ahead and be executed. He was 27. And yes he probably has killed a cop. But the thing that REALLY gets at me is that some people just think that it's easier to take his life too than to understand why he did that. Society kills a man, but is society's conscience clean? And so now there are two dead people, two broken families and two graves. Is our society any safer now? I'm sorry, I'm just a pen pal and not any victim's family, I really do feel for you who have lost a loved one by the hand of someone sitting in death row, but I just think there are other ways of dealing with crime and imposing death is not going to help you. I send my love and prayers to you.
__________________
Everyone is calm and collected but I am telling you something. I am not calm and I am not collected. It’s a sick world out there.
Clive Stafford Smith over Edward Johnson’s execution.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to +VERDE+ For This Useful Post:
Bjlifelines (12-01-2019), kestrel91316 (11-05-2015)
Sponsored Links
  #152  
Old 11-03-2015, 09:16 AM
nomireatras nomireatras is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: too far away
Posts: 742
Thanks: 247
Thanked 772 Times in 342 Posts
Default

For me, it comes down to the state. Many states that have the death penalty have not executed anyone in many years yet in other states, execution happens often. I do not believe that knowing there is a death penalty stops a person from killing another. And I also believe that someone is more than just a moment in time in his/her life. I do not think that our government should kill anyone. To me wanting the death penalty is not justice, it is vengeance. But I have never had a loved one murdered so I cannot speak for those who have suffered this kind of loss.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to nomireatras For This Useful Post:
+VERDE+ (11-04-2015), kestrel91316 (11-05-2015)
  #153  
Old 02-16-2019, 03:30 AM
s.o.l.d.i.e.r s.o.l.d.i.e.r is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

[quote=s.o.l.d.i.e.r;7764651]Personally myself, the death penalty in my opinion serves as vengeance. No matter how we view or feel about situations, it is never justifiable to murder ANYONE, especially in the idea of punishment. It creates more emotional pain because no matter how we look at it life is not ours to give or take, and every individual under the sun is loved by at least one person. There is no logic excuse to take a life that doesn't belong to you
Reply With Quote
  #154  
Old 11-28-2019, 05:13 PM
RaeLR RaeLR is online now
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 65
Thanks: 117
Thanked 165 Times in 42 Posts
Default

A lifer told me, "If I had known 16 years ago what the "lesser" sentence was going to be, I would have asked for the death penalty. Because life without is a life without possibilities and a life without possibilities is no life!" This man has tried to kill himself twice and he intends to try again because the thought of dying alone in prison and living every day of his life on two concrete blocks is something he can't deal with. My man is also serving life without. He said that sentence is society's ultimate cruelty because they deem you a wounded animal but they don't put you down or cure you, they just put you in a cage and let you suffer. Most developed nations have done away with "life without mercy" because it is seen as cruel and unusual punishment. What kind of a society are we when we declare someone irredeemable at a young age? No matter what they do from that point on, they have no hope of forgiveness or redemption.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to RaeLR For This Useful Post:
strangelove (11-29-2019)
  #155  
Old 11-28-2019, 05:28 PM
Visitor611 Visitor611 is offline
Until the end
 

Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Oregon
Posts: 170
Thanks: 143
Thanked 288 Times in 108 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaeLR View Post
A lifer told me, "If I had known 16 years ago what the "lesser" sentence was going to be, I would have asked for the death penalty. Because life without is a life without possibilities and a life without possibilities is no life!" This man has tried to kill himself twice and he intends to try again because the thought of dying alone in prison and living every day of his life on two concrete blocks is something he can't deal with. My man is also serving life without. He said that sentence is society's ultimate cruelty because they deem you a wounded animal but they don't put you down or cure you, they just put you in a cage and let you suffer. Most developed nations have done away with "life without mercy" because it is seen as cruel and unusual punishment. What kind of a society are we when we declare someone irredeemable at a young age? No matter what they do from that point on, they have no hope of forgiveness or redemption.
I think all the people that commit mass shootings are irredeemable and don't deserve anything less.
Reply With Quote
  #156  
Old 11-29-2019, 12:36 PM
strangelove strangelove is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: N/A
Posts: 2
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Personally, I feel the death penalty should not exist.
I do believe that some people need to be locked up for the rest of their lives and have forfeited any chance of redemption. However, this category is not applicable to an awful lot of offenders currently serving and being given LWOP, in my opinion!
As to the original question; What’s worse to receive, the death penalty or LWOP?
Find it hard to even form an opinion here. Reckon since the answer to this question will depend on the mindset and circumstances of each individual convict, it’s impossible to determine which sentence is harsher to receive per se.
Reply With Quote
  #157  
Old 11-29-2019, 01:58 PM
Taliba00's Avatar
Taliba00 Taliba00 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 190
Thanks: 675
Thanked 281 Times in 123 Posts
Default

My LO says it's more honest to execute a man deemed irredeemable by society than locking him up in a concrete cage for his entire life. He says he would prefer the raw honesty of being taken out in front of a wall, looked directly in the eyes by his executioner, and shot dead on the spot, than to endure an extended death sentence surrounded by concrete. He considers the suicide option every once in a while, and the only thing that stops him is his religious faith. He says we put down vicious or sick animals all the time -- we consdier it the humane thing to do. We don't keep dangerous, foaming-at-the-mouth dogs locked into a kennel for the rest of their natural lives -- we put them down, as an act of mercy and public safety. He says he'd like that approach applied to him -- if he's considered that dangerous, that unforgivable, that irredeemable, then put him down already.
Reply With Quote
  #158  
Old 11-29-2019, 03:52 PM
yourself yourself is offline
attorney
 

Join Date: May 2010
Location: around
Posts: 12,043
Thanks: 4,336
Thanked 22,046 Times in 7,672 Posts
Default

People are not dogs. People can be reasoned with and are generally not foaming at the mouth mad all the time to the point that they are biting others.

I live in a state without a death penalty since Sacco and Vanzetti were executed for a crime they did not commit. Anti-anarchist and anti-Italian and anti-immigrant sentiment played a huge role in this. It is too easy to lock up innocent people. The more innocent people locked up, the number of innocent people sentenced to death increases.

I practiced in IL and Iowa for a number of years. Iowa has not had the death penalty since the early 1960’s. Before that, in the 1930’s, the inmates serving life petitioned the governor of the state on behalf of two death row inmates facing imminent execution. They noted that there were several hundred murderers among them, some with crimes more heinous than the two men facing death. Fairness would dictate that the men be resentenced to life. Of course this did not work, but it was interesting to note that the life inmates knew the injustice and arbitrary nature of the death penalty well enough and were passionate enough about it that they petitioned the governor.

In Illinois, it took around 20 exonerations to bring about a moratorium on the death penalty and the eventual removal of the death penalty from the law. Then gov. Ryan freed 3 people directly from death row in the process because of actual innocence. And it was in part about corrupt cops in a particular area who would beat confessions out of people. This is not limited to IL - there have been overturned death penalties in most jurisdictions due to things like a corrupt crime lab, bad policing, false confessions, corrupt psychologists offering opinions on future dangerousness, etc, etc, etc. at the same time, they executed John Wayne Gacy.

The Class of ‘72 is instructive - those were the men and women freed from Death Row when the Furman decision came down. They included people like Manson, as ell as your more ordinary murderer and a few rapists. Many were eventually released and there are a few books on the topic if you are truly interested, but the crux of it is that the vast majority of the Class of ‘72 never committed another act of violence. Only like 6 went on to murder again (one was a serial murderer who got out in Texas because Texas had an overcrowding problem and released a lot of people before they were ready).

Here's the other thing about the death penalty that is problematic - besides victimizing the family of the condemned, it victimizes the staff forced to carry out the executions. You should hear from some of the people who have come out of the system broken by their participation. Those folks and their families become victims when they participate in executions.

So, those who know me know about Shane. Before I was an attorney, when I was around 22, Shane came to live with me for a year, give or take, after his father's death when his mom could not cope. I liked the kid - he was gangly and goofy and had a good heart, but, about 10 years later, he killed a man, tried to kill his wife, and kidnapped their daughter, his former girlfriend. There is no doubt about his guilt. In the state where this occurred, had it been an election year, I am sure he would have faced death. Instead, he got LWOP +10 (+10 because there was a gun involved). He has been down around 20 years.

There are phases that a person goes through when they know that the only way they are getting out is through a toe tag parole. Most contemplate suicide. A lot get involved in addictions - blotting out the world with drugs. The key to living in prison for the rest of your life is to create a life in prison. There is plenty he is contributing while in prison, and since he is not a gang member or thinking about getting out, his attention is on where he is at and who he is with. Close friendships are possible in prison. Learning is possible. Finding a job and volunteer work is possible. Creating a life inside is possible.

And even with LWOP, there is still hope. Laws change. Clemency is possible. But, you need to work for it every day for a few decades.

Lining a person up to be shot? No. I have a friend whose brother was shot by the State of Utah. The trauma that man and his family have endured because of it? I would not wish that on anybody.
Reply With Quote
  #159  
Old 11-29-2019, 08:30 PM
wholeshabang's Avatar
wholeshabang wholeshabang is offline
Sealed for Freshness
 

Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: NY NY
Posts: 253
Thanks: 27
Thanked 50 Times in 34 Posts
Default

I think the death penalty is tougher than LWOP because it has an impact not just on that person, but also their family and friends. As long as they are alive, they can have visits, write/receive mail, make/receive phone calls with others on the outside. I am not against the death penalty, but I think it is the ultimate sentence, full stop.
__________________
LET ER RIP... TATER CHIP
Reply With Quote
  #160  
Old 11-29-2019, 11:40 PM
Desertdweller11 Desertdweller11 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired-10 View Post
IceBlue - You made a point I was discussing with someone else earlier tonight. I don't have any DR penpals but I'd love to ask someone what THEY thought was the harsher sentence and I highly doubt I'd ever heard a DR inmate say they're happier being on DR instead of being given LWOP.

Yes, lifers have to live with the knowledge that they're never getting out but at least they're able to possibly work in the prison, gain an education, make friendships in the prison, etc. It FEELS like a real life, in a way. One of my 'pals best friends in prison has a life sentence. He's only in his cell from 11pm-6:30am every day. He had a job until recently and he's also taking college classes. I'd take that any day over being put to death. God, not some judge, should decide when I die...
But didnt that person and not God or a judge decide for the person they murdered.
If it is cut and dry and a senseless or cruel crime, why shouldnt we eradicate that from existence rather than allow the gift of life.
Reply With Quote
  #161  
Old 11-30-2019, 12:00 AM
Taliba00's Avatar
Taliba00 Taliba00 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 190
Thanks: 675
Thanked 281 Times in 123 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yourself View Post
People are not dogs. People can be reasoned with and are generally not foaming at the mouth mad all the time to the point that they are biting others.

I live in a state without a death penalty since Sacco and Vanzetti were executed for a crime they did not commit. Anti-anarchist and anti-Italian and anti-immigrant sentiment played a huge role in this. It is too easy to lock up innocent people. The more innocent people locked up, the number of innocent people sentenced to death increases.

I practiced in IL and Iowa for a number of years. Iowa has not had the death penalty since the early 1960’s. Before that, in the 1930’s, the inmates serving life petitioned the governor of the state on behalf of two death row inmates facing imminent execution. They noted that there were several hundred murderers among them, some with crimes more heinous than the two men facing death. Fairness would dictate that the men be resentenced to life. Of course this did not work, but it was interesting to note that the life inmates knew the injustice and arbitrary nature of the death penalty well enough and were passionate enough about it that they petitioned the governor.

In Illinois, it took around 20 exonerations to bring about a moratorium on the death penalty and the eventual removal of the death penalty from the law. Then gov. Ryan freed 3 people directly from death row in the process because of actual innocence. And it was in part about corrupt cops in a particular area who would beat confessions out of people. This is not limited to IL - there have been overturned death penalties in most jurisdictions due to things like a corrupt crime lab, bad policing, false confessions, corrupt psychologists offering opinions on future dangerousness, etc, etc, etc. at the same time, they executed John Wayne Gacy.

The Class of ‘72 is instructive - those were the men and women freed from Death Row when the Furman decision came down. They included people like Manson, as ell as your more ordinary murderer and a few rapists. Many were eventually released and there are a few books on the topic if you are truly interested, but the crux of it is that the vast majority of the Class of ‘72 never committed another act of violence. Only like 6 went on to murder again (one was a serial murderer who got out in Texas because Texas had an overcrowding problem and released a lot of people before they were ready).

Here's the other thing about the death penalty that is problematic - besides victimizing the family of the condemned, it victimizes the staff forced to carry out the executions. You should hear from some of the people who have come out of the system broken by their participation. Those folks and their families become victims when they participate in executions.

So, those who know me know about Shane. Before I was an attorney, when I was around 22, Shane came to live with me for a year, give or take, after his father's death when his mom could not cope. I liked the kid - he was gangly and goofy and had a good heart, but, about 10 years later, he killed a man, tried to kill his wife, and kidnapped their daughter, his former girlfriend. There is no doubt about his guilt. In the state where this occurred, had it been an election year, I am sure he would have faced death. Instead, he got LWOP +10 (+10 because there was a gun involved). He has been down around 20 years.

There are phases that a person goes through when they know that the only way they are getting out is through a toe tag parole. Most contemplate suicide. A lot get involved in addictions - blotting out the world with drugs. The key to living in prison for the rest of your life is to create a life in prison. There is plenty he is contributing while in prison, and since he is not a gang member or thinking about getting out, his attention is on where he is at and who he is with. Close friendships are possible in prison. Learning is possible. Finding a job and volunteer work is possible. Creating a life inside is possible.

And even with LWOP, there is still hope. Laws change. Clemency is possible. But, you need to work for it every day for a few decades.

Lining a person up to be shot? No. I have a friend whose brother was shot by the State of Utah. The trauma that man and his family have endured because of it? I would not wish that on anybody.
I'll pass it on and let you know what he says in response.
Reply With Quote
  #162  
Old 11-30-2019, 03:06 AM
strangelove strangelove is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: N/A
Posts: 2
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desertdweller11 View Post
... why shouldnt we eradicate that from existence rather than allow the gift of life.


Please allow me to zoom in on your statement in order to piggy back on it to elaborate on my differing point of view.
I can sympathize with the “an eye for an eye” attitude on an emotional level. With wanting to exterminate a person who has done something so atrocious it’s hard to comprehend. With the impulse that a perpetrator must suffer. As they made their victims and their families suffer so terribly.
Yet “that” still is a human being, and to me, a civilized society ought not to dehumanize. Not even offenders of atrocious crimes. Nor should a penal and judicial system in any way, shape or form be based on the idea that sentencing and incarceration are a form of revenge.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A Legal Quest Against the Death Penalty. softheart Death Row & Capital Punishment Discussions 7 06-10-2007 07:22 PM
Article: The Ultimate Penalty (Athens, GA) strongernow Georgia Prison & Criminal Justice News & Events 0 06-14-2005 07:16 AM
News bullitin for Louisiana Death Row Imconfused World Prison News 0 01-02-2005 10:52 PM
Federal death penalty rarely applied danielle Death Row & Capital Punishment Discussions 0 11-17-2002 10:22 AM
Indiana may end death penalty Tricia46311 Prison Legislation & Laws 4 04-11-2002 03:27 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:01 PM.
Copyright © 2001- 2017 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics