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  #51  
Old 07-23-2005, 04:41 AM
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Default Last Comanche Code Talker Passes Away

Last Comanche Code Talker Passes Away

Native American Times, News Feature, Sam Lewin, Jul 24, 2005

TULSA, Okla. -- Now they are all gone.

Charles Chibitty, the last remaining Comanche Code Talker, has passed way. Chibitty died June 19 at the age of 83.
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“He would talk to you about anything and everything,” Dee Cates told the Native American Times. Cates became the guardian of Chibitty’s daughter when he was admitted into a nursing home. “He treated me like family.”

Chibitty was one of 17 Oklahoma Comanches attached to the 4th Infantry Division, 4th Signal Corps, during WWII. According to a biography from United States Department of Defense, Chibitty was born near Medicine Park, Okla. on Nov. 20, 1921. After attending Haskell Indian School in Lawrence, Kan., he enlisted in the U.S. Army in January 1941. While in the Army, Cpl. Chibitty earned the World War II Victory Medal, the European Theater of Operations (5th Bronze Star) Victory Medal, the Europe African Middle East Campaign Medal, and the Good Conduct Medal.

In 1989, the French Government honored the Comanche Code Talkers, including Chibitty, by presenting them the "Chevalier of the National Order of Merit." In 1992, then-Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney presented Chibitty with a certificate of appreciation for his service to the country. That day Chibitty recalled the first message he translated after landing in Normandy: "Five miles to the right of the designated area and five miles inland, the fighting is fierce and we need help."

"We were trying to let them know where we were so they wouldn't lob no shells on us," he said. "I was with the 22nd Infantry Regiment of the 4th Infantry Division. We talked Indian and sent messages when need be. It was quicker to use telephones and radios to send messages because Morse code had to be decoded and the Germans could decode them. We used telephones and radios to talk Indian then wrote it in English and gave it to the commanding officer."

During the ceremony Chibitty was asked if he was ever hit by enemy fire.

"Heck, no. I was like a prairie dog. As soon as I heard a whistle, I'd dive in that hole. I was little then. I weighed 126 pounds and it didn't take long for me to dig my hole. My buddy weighed 240 pounds and some of them were more than six feet tall and they had to dig a long trench,” he replied.
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He also expressed sadness that so many Comanche Code Talkers died before receiving recognition.

"The only thing I regret is my fellow code talkers are not here," Chibitty said. "But I have a feeling those boys are here somewhere listening and looking down."

Cates recalled that she would drive Chibitty to various speaking engagements.

“He would always tell young people that it didn’t matter what color you were or where you were from. He would say that everyone should be proud of who they are. That was him. He was proud to be an Indian and proud to be a veteran.”

Chibitty also received a special proclamation from the Governor of Oklahoma, honoring him for his service.

In addition to his military exploits, Chibitty was a championship dancer and a successful boxer in his early years. Active in the community until his death, Chibitty was well known at the American Indian Chamber of Commerce of Oklahoma.

“He meant a lot not only to the Tulsa Indian community as an elder, but as a voice for the Choctaw Tribe. He mentored young Indian people because he saw that we need that,” chamber president Margo Gray said.
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  #52  
Old 07-23-2005, 04:43 AM
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Default Police Abuse? Visiting surgeon weighing options in wake of confrontation with Albuqu

Police Abuse?
Visiting surgeon weighing options in wake of confrontation with Albuquerque cops


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From the home in Gallup where he is staying, GIMC heart surgeon Vincent Moss talks on the phone Wednesday with attorneys about a potential lawsuit against the Albuquerque Police Department for excessive use of force. [Photo by John A. Bowersmith/Independent]

By Leslie Wood
Staff Writer

GALLUP — A 34-year-old Gallup Indian Medical Center heart surgeon reclined on a plush cream sofa on Wednesday night as he juggled telephone calls from zealous attorneys hoping to represent him in a potential lawsuit against the Albuquerque Police Department.

To be exact, nine attorneys, from across the nation, have contacted Maryland native Vincent Moss since news broke about an incident where police allegedly beat him up outside an Albuquerque tavern.

However, the officers and bar owner assert appropriate force was used and Moss came toward them in a threatening manner.

Moss was visiting Albuquerque for the weekend after hearing of the city's reputation.

"I was just walking the beautiful streets of Albuquerque," he said. Moss said he approached Maloney's tavern manager Dave Buehring to question why he had not been served, after he had been ignored by the bar's wait staff for nearly 30 minutes.

Albuquerque police officers reportedly watched as Buehring and Moss discussed his treatment outside the downtown establishment and only took action once Moss followed Buehring back into the bar to settle a tab.

The incident escalated when officers grabbed Moss by the shirt and eventually pushed him onto the ground causing his shoulder to dislocate. Meanwhile, Moss said he was trying to introduce himself as a Gallup physician.

In addition to a dislocated shoulder, Moss sustained multiple bruises on his upper arm and left eye. He was subsequently booked into the Albuquerque detention center and made a $75 bond about 12 hours later.

Due to his injuries, Moss said he is unable to conduct surgery without an assistant. He plans to investigate the incident to determine whether a lawsuit is warranted.

"I want to gather all the facts to decide whether I should pursue legal matters," Moss said. "... but I do know excessive force was used."

He's not certain if his neglect as a customer was race-related because the tavern was filled with more than 100 customers at the time, he said. But he did call witness statements that he came toward the officers in an aggressive stance "a complete lie."

"It's unfortunate it happened to me," he said. "But what is fortunate is that I'll do something about it. I'll do whatever it takes."

Moss is temporarily working at GIMC as a heart surgeon until he is deployed to Iraq in September.

"He has been able to do things they usually can't accommodate," Louise Frechette, said of the surgeon who is temporarily staying at her and her husband's home.

When he arrived in Gallup in late June at about 2 a.m., Moss said he was followed to his Linda Street residence by at least three Gallup police officers who were patrolling the area.

He said a female officer pulled him over and asked if he was lost. The officers then followed Moss until he arrived at the location.

"It's so vague that it's not worth filing a complaint," Moss said. "I can't say it was race-related, but you can never rule it out."

He said incidents such as this are a more common of an occurrence since his arrival to the southwest. Gallup Police Chief Sylvester Stanley said it is not the department's policy to pull over a vehicle without probable cause.

"It's not our procedure to follow people regardless of their color," Stanley said.

However, he invited Moss to meet with him if he had a complaint.

Moss said he has already discussed the Albuquerque incident with the Mayor Martin Chavez, the police department and the governor's office.

Buehring could not be reached for comment, as of press time.
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  #53  
Old 07-23-2005, 04:46 AM
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Default Indians over rated at the cost of white men

DAVID GELERNTER

No more cheating for a good cause

DAVID GELERNTER

July 22, 2005

Sandra day o'connor's retirement from the Supreme Court should make us ponder affirmative action. Her most influential piece of writing might well be the 2003 court opinion allowing the University of Michigan Law School to continue race-based admissions for the time being — so long as there were no racial quotas. It was the first time the court had ever endorsed race-based university admissions.

And of course, O'Connor herself was the first woman on the Supreme Court. When President Reagan nominated her in 1981, affirmative action was fairly new; O'Connor made it look good. She was superbly qualified, yet presumably would have been overlooked had Reagan not searched expressly for a female.

But that was long ago. Today, affirmative action is ripe for the junkyard. There's dramatic evidence in President Bush nominating a garden-variety white male to O'Connor's seat. He said something important by doing so. Consider the fact that for much of the 20th century, the "Jewish seat" was a Supreme Court convention. To have one Jew on the court (no more, no less) seemed proper and fitting. But in time Jews went mainstream and the single "Jewish seat" quietly disappeared. (There are now two Jewish justices).

Bush has delivered a comparable message to women and minorities: Welcome to the mainstream! We don't need a "woman's seat" on the court. There are no more outsiders in American life.

Now let's get rid of affirmative action.

In practice, affirmative action means cheating in a good cause. (But all cheating, for any cause, gnaws at a nation's moral innards like termites.) Affirmative action means a plus factor in university admissions, job hiring and promotion for candidates from protected groups, in the interests of "diversity." (But why should "diversity" mean official "minorities" and women but not libertarians, farmers, Mormons, Texans, children of soldiers, aspiring Catholic priests, etc.?)

Affirmative action is highly unpopular: A 2003 Washington Post-Harvard-Kaiser Family Foundation survey found that 92% of the public (86% of blacks) agreed that admissions, hiring and promotion decisions "should be based strictly on merit and qualifications other than race/ethnicity." Only bureaucrats and intellectuals (species that are more closely related than they seem) love affirmative action.

Is it really "cheating"? In 2003, Linda Chavez, the head of the Center for Equal Opportunity, described University of Michigan freshman admissions as they stood in the mid-1990s: "We found that the odds ratio favoring admission of a black applicant with identical grades and test scores to a white applicant was 174 to 1." The high court struck down that admissions procedure, but it's a frightening reminder of what people can do in the name of fairness.

Affirmative actions begs comparison with the Vietnam War: two hugely ambitious programs with no exit strategies. In 1965, the Johnson administration launched affirmative action. The Nixon administration relaunched it in 1970, requiring all federal contractors to set "goals and timetables" to govern black hiring. It spread quickly (as a legal requirement or voluntary policy) to unions, government agencies, big business, universities.

It was intended originally not to create diversity but to stamp out prejudice in a hurry. As such, it bears another strange resemblance to Vietnam. You could argue in both cases that we won but refused to admit it. Some modern historians insist that we defeated the Vietnamese communists, then walked off and let them win by default. And we have stamped out so much prejudice that nowadays we are at least as strongly bigoted in favor of women and minorities as we are bigoted against them — as any 10-year-old can tell you.

Textbooks widely used in public schools consistently downplay white men in favor of women and minorities. (Thomas Edison gets less space than a black scientist who tweaked one of Edison's inventions. A Navajo physicist gets a detailed write-up, but Albert Einstein doesn't appear. A biologist of the Seneca tribe is credited with nothing noteworthy, but he gets a picture while James Watson and Francis Crick, co-founders of modern genetics, don't rate a mention. At virtually any U.S. university, female or minority faculty candidates are in vastly greater demand than plain old white males.

Affirmative action has turned the United States into an aristocracy. British aristocrats have enjoyed their own kind of "reverse discrimination" for a thousand years. America's affirmative-action aristocrats were only created a generation ago; until then, they were targets of bigotry themselves. So what? No aristocracy is acceptable in the U.S.

O'Connor wrote in the University of Michigan ruling that affirmative action must end some day. George W. might be just the man to end it.
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Old 07-23-2005, 04:47 AM
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Default Students worried about future of FNUC's Saskatoon campus

Students worried about future of FNUC's Saskatoon campus
Last Updated: Jul 21 2005 09:28 AM CDT

Regina-based First Nations University of Canada is exploring the possibility of closing its Saskatoon campus as a cash-saving measure, sources have told CBC News.

Beau Ballerneault, who's with FNUC's Saskatoon students' association, said he learned the option of closing the Saskatoon campus came up during last week's board of governor's meeting.



The move would save the university about $820,000 annually.



Other sources have told CBC News the option of closing the Saskatoon campus was tabled at last week's board meeting.



Newly appointed FNUC president Charles Pratt wouldn't speak to the CBC on this matter.



A spokesperson for Pratt said he's looking at all options, but closing the Saskatoon campus has not been seriously considered.



Earlier this year, CBC reported FNUC was running a deficit that could top $3 million and was looking at a series of cutbacks.



"They tell us not to worry, that no program will be cut, that we're only looking at a $1.3-million shortfall, that the $3-million shortfall is exaggerated," Ballerneault said.



"You know, to cut out one campus, that shows you right there that this is a lot more serious than what the FSIN or Al Ducharme and Charles Pratt are trying to make it look like."



Ducharme is one of the administrators brought in following a series of suspensions of senior officials in February.



Since then, the only First Nations-controlled institution of its kind in Canada has been in turmoil.



Several senior officials have been dismissed, including vice-president of administration Wes Stevenson and Saskatoon campus dean Winona Wheeler.



On Wednesday, FNUC said Regina campus dean Dawn Tato had been dismissed.
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  #55  
Old 07-23-2005, 04:51 AM
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Default New sites may be added on NC Trail of Tears

CITIZEN-TIMES.com

Steps taken to add spots in WNC to official Trail of Tears




By Jill Ingram, Staff Writer
July 21, 2005 6:00 am

Some of more than 20 routes and sites in Western North Carolina may be considered for addition to the historic Cherokee Trail of Tears.

These include Fort Butler, the command center for deportation in North Carolina and part of what is now Murphy, and the Unicoi Turnpike, the primary route used to deport Cherokee from Western North Carolina to Tennessee. Inclusion on the trail could take years, but a bill now in Congress is the first stage in the designation, and a series of wayside markers is also in the works.

“The research is done. It’s pretty cut and dry,” said Barbara R. Duncan, education director with the Museum of the Cherokee Indian.

The Trail of Tears is the collective name for multiple routes, on both water and land, which about 16,000 Cherokee traveled under different detachments during a forced western deportation in 1838 and 1839 under the orders of President Andrew Jackson.

Although nearly 3,000 Cherokee who were forced to march were from North Carolina and about 9,000 were from Georgia, routes through those states are not designated portions of the trail. The trail also excludes two major arteries in Arkansas and water routes in eastern Tennessee.

Between 4,000 and 8,000 people died during the journey, according to Duncan. The length of the journey varied depending on the route taken, but averaged about 1,000 miles.

The historically designated trail is an integrated system of routes and sites (including sites in North Carolina and Georgia) that tell the story of life at the time of removal and the story of the removal itself. The trail is maintained by the National Park Service and was designated in 1987.

Many of those who survived eventually settled on a reservation in Oklahoma, now the home of the more than 255,000-member Cherokee Nation. Cherokee who resisted the march eventually formed what is now the 13,300-member Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, on land in WNC bordered by Jackson and Swain counties and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Brett Riggs, an archaeologist with the Research Laboratories of Archaeology at UNC-Chapel Hill, has spent years researching WNC Cherokee sites, primarily in Cherokee County, for the North Carolina chapter of the national Trail of Tears Association.

Riggs is finalizing a study for the National Park Service that details Cherokee-related sites in WNC relevant to the trail. Those sites include Army installations where Cherokee were interred prior to the march, roads, stores, private residences and more.

No evidence remains of most of the sites. Some are covered with heavy development, some are underwater and one is covered by a highway. The Unicoi Turnpike, an abandoned wagon road that runs through woods between Clay and Cherokee counties, is the lone exception.

The office has the option of reviewing projects on traditional Cherokee land that involve federal land, money or permits. Russell Townsend is a member of the Cherokee Nation who works in the Eastern Band’s Historic Preservation Office.

Recognizing routes and sites relevant to the trail serves a contemporary purpose, Townsend said.

“It’s important because it’s a reminder to people who now occupy (what was once) the Cherokee nation and aren’t Cherokee that the land was acquired at bayonet point,” he said. “Finally, after 170-odd years, the story’s getting told.”

Townsend said that WNC counties and the tribe recognize that trail additions could be opportunities to expand the region’s heritage tourism offerings.

“You can still walk in trails that Cherokee walked in the Trail of Tears,” Townsend said. “It’s really moving when you get up there.”

Larry Blythe, vice president of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and Chadwick Smith, principal chief of Oklahoma’s Cherokee Nation, were in Washington last month for the introduction of the Trail of Tears Documentation Act, which directs the Interior Department to review new evidence and complete the historical picture through markers and other forms of recognition.

Smith called the Cherokee plight a “travesty of justice, sham of public policy and disdain for human dignity.”

U.S. Rep. Charles Taylor, R-Brevard, is sponsoring the Cherokee Trail of Tears Documentation Act along with U.S. Reps. Tennessee Republican Zach Wamp and Arkansas Democrat Marion Berry.

Taylor has “always been a big supporter of the Eastern Band,” said Deborah Potter, Taylor’s press secretary, who works in Asheville. “Generally, if they ask him to get behind something, he follows their wishes.”

This is the first step in expanding the trail. The second step is an amendment by Congress of the original act designating the trail so that it can include new routes and sites.

Paxton Myers, Eastern Band tribal representative, said he doesn’t see any opposition to the bill.

Most lawmakers — including many from the South — were mum in 1830 when Jackson sought to remove the tribes. Davy Crockett was the lone Tennessee congressman to oppose the plans and lost re-election as a result.

Riggs said the trail has essentially been traced backward, west to east, and the neglected portions of the North Carolina and Georgia trail weren’t the result of malice but a lack of research and funding.

No matter what happens with the Trail of Tears designation, Riggs said there’s a plan to erect a series of wayside exhibits explaining their significance by the end of the year.

Riggs said the full trail will never be complete.

“In its truest sense,” he said, “the Trail of Tears began at each Cherokee house and led west.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Contact Ingram at JIngram@CITIZEN-TIMES.com.
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  #56  
Old 07-23-2005, 04:53 AM
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Default Cherokee Nation makes donation to local agencies

Saturday, July 23, 2005
Last modified Friday, July 22, 2005 6:09 PM CDThttp://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/art/spacer.gif
Cherokee Nation makes donation to local agencies

http://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/art/spacer.gif
By Bob Gibbins, Press Staff Writer Two local law enforcement agencies got thee proverbial shot in the arm this week and will move closer to scoring departmental goals, thanks to the Cherokee Nation.

The Cherokee County Sheriff's Office and Tahlequah Police Department received donations from the tribe. District 1 Tribal Councilors Bill John Baker and Audra Conner presented checks Thursday to Sheriff Norman Fisher and Police Chief Steve Farmer.

Farmer intends to use the $20,000 gift to purchase two drug dogs for the department and equip a department vehicle for transporting the dogs. Fisher will use the $25,000 the CN gave his agency to buy accessories for the new patrol cars the department purchased earlier this year.

The grants will allow both departments to accomplish their goals more quickly than they originally anticipated.

"I want to thank Bill John and Audra for thinking of the sheriff's office," Fisher said. "Our budget is tight, and this should help us get those new cars out there quicker than we thought."

Farmer may have had the money in the TPD budget for one drug dog, but will now be able to get two dogs to work with the officers in narcotics investigations. He intends to begin procuring the animals right away.

Baker said the monies have been accumulating for the past three years through tribal tag sales. He Conner chose to pool their money and give it to the police department and sheriff's office. The Cherokee Nation has already been giving hundreds of thousands of dollars to schools within the 14 counties of its jurisdiction.

"We know there are other important areas, like law enforcement, and we don't want them to be less prepared," Baker said. "They protect Cherokee people and our housing projects."

The council has said it would use the money in the communities.

"It's time for us to pay the piper and do what we said," Baker said.

Conner said she, too, is glad to provide the assistance to local law enforcement.

Baker said drugs are a major problem within the Cherokee Nation, and anything the tribe can do to help in the fight is a positive measure. He said helping equip vehicles in the sheriff's office is also important because the new cars will aid deputies in safely getting to calls to assist both tribal and non-tribal members.

Farmer said funds for the drug dogs will also help the schools, which can now work with the police department when they need one on campus, rather than securing one with their own budgets.

"Our current fleet of vehicles is not in good shape," Fisher said. "Hopefully, with this assistance from Cherokee Nation, we can get some new, better-equipped cars on the street."
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  #57  
Old 07-23-2005, 04:58 AM
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Default Convicted Roseburg knife murderer's appeal denied

Convicted Roseburg knife murderer's appeal denied


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JOHN SOWELL, jsowell@newsreview.info
July 18, 2005
http://www.newsreview.info/graphics/spacer.gif

http://www.newsreview.info/graphics/spacer.gif
The Oregon Court of Appeals has turned down an appeal from convicted Douglas County murderer Scott Steffler.

Steffler, who turned 27 today, was convicted of the Aug. 15, 1999, stabbing death of Roseburg resident Sheila Theeler. Steffler, who had resided in the same downtown Roseburg apartment building as the victim, accompanied Theeler to a secluded hillside off Lookingglass Road on the night she was killed.

At some point, Steffler struck Theeler and then chased her down after she ran away. He ended up stabbing her more than 30 times.

A jury convicted Steffler of aggravated murder and intentional murder. Rick Wesenberg, the senior deputy district attorney who prosecuted the case, had planned to seek the death penalty. However, before the start of the penalty phase of the trial, Steffler agreed to a deal where he would spend the rest of his life in prison, without the chance for parole, in exchange for Wesenberg dropping his demand for the death penalty.

In his appeal, Steffler argued that the introduction of the murder knife at trial should have been suppressed. The weapon was recovered when Steffler was arrested a few days after the murder in Sacramento, Calif., after being spotted at a bus station. He had a ticket to the East Coast.

The knife was found in a bag Steffler was carrying when he was apprehended. He warned officers to be careful, because there was blood on the knife in the bag. Officers at the scene removed the knife from the bag rather than wait to obtain a search warrant.

Steffler also argued that he wasn't properly advised of his Miranda rights to remain silent. Although he signed a card waiving his rights before speaking to detectives, his lawyers argued the officers should have advised him of his rights again before talking with him during subsequent interviews.

Steffler also argued that Douglas County did not have jurisdiction to prosecute him because he was a member of the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians. He claimed the tribe's 1853 treaty with the federal government made it a federal case, not a local one. The prosecution argued that because the crime did not occur on tribal land and did not involve a Native American victim, it was rightfully prosecuted in Douglas County Circuit Court.

The Court of Appeals issued its ruling against Steffler, without comment, on June 15. It took several weeks to obtain a copy of the briefs filed in the Court of Appeals case to learn the issues involved. Steffler is serving his sentence at the Snake River Correctional Facility in Ontario.



* You can reach reporter John Sowell at 957-4209 or by e-mail at
jsowell@newsreview.info.
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Old 07-23-2005, 05:00 AM
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Default ESPN brings WEIO Eskimo Olympics) games into the national spotlight

ESPN brings WEIO games into the national spotlight

By MATT NEVALA
Anchorage Daily News


Published: July 21st, 2005
Last Modified: July 21st, 2005 at 03:31 AM


From drum beats to traditional dances, music is as much a part of the World Eskimo-Indian Olympics' cultural setting as athletic events.

So maybe it's fitting that a television tune familiar to sports fans everywhere will emanate from Fairbanks' Big Dipper Arena today:

Da, da, da ... da, da, da -- this is ESPN's SportsCenter in Alaska at the World Eskimo-Indian Olympics.

SportsCenter, ESPN's flagship show and the nation's most popular sports news program, broadcasts from the 44th edition of WEIO today as part of the channel's "SportsCenter Across America -- 50 States in 50 Days" tour. The first shots from Alaska are scheduled to be seen live on the 2 p.m. ADT edition of SportsCenter and repeated later tonight and through Friday's early-morning rebroadcasts.

"WEIO caught our eye through the research we did," said Mark Gross, an ESPN senior coordinating producer. "It's something unique, something people don't know about."

"SportsCenter Across America," a road trip that takes ESPN to a sporting event in every state, started Sunday at Boston's Fenway Park for New York Yankees vs. Boston Red Sox baseball. It made stops in New Hampshire (minor league baseball), Idaho (rodeo) and Iowa (baseball) earlier this week before making the trek to Alaska.

"I'm so pleased with the fact ESPN decided WEIO is the place it wants to be," said WEIO general manager Rhonda Joseph. "After working 12 hours a day every day the last two weeks, I like to see exactly what ESPN is giving us -- live coverage.

"It gets our name on the map."

Viewers can expect to see ESPN anchor Steve Levy sitting at a mobile "SportsCenter" set inside Big Dipper Arena. Levy, probably known best for his play-by-play announcing of National Hockey League games, is one of 15 ESPN anchors on the tour. Four ESPN production teams are criss-crossing the country through Sept. 4.

Gross said Levy will broadcast three segments from WEIO. The first will introduce Alaska to many of the 88 million people who watch "SportsCenter" at least once a month, according to the network. The "welcome" segment includes historical notes, facts and information on the state's contribution to the national sports scene. This is where you're likely to see old footage of NHL star Scott Gomez hoisting the Stanley Cup, guard Mark Schlereth blocking for Denver's John Elway in the Super Bowl and four-time Iditarod champion Susan Butcher crossing the Nome finish line.

The second segment should focus on WEIO. What is it? What does it mean to Alaska? Who are the champions? Joseph said WEIO athletes will demonstrate many events.

WEIO will offer a national audience something they've probably never seen, and viewers from coast to coast could get hooked by the event names. After all, how often does the knuckle hop, ear pull or one-foot high kick get aired on national television?

But WEIO won't be the only unusual stop during "SportsCenter Across America."

Get ready for foosball in Virginia, prison rodeo in Oklahoma and pie eating in Maine.

"I don't rank WEIO with foosball or pie eating," Joseph said. "We're in a league of our own.

"All games and events are geared towards our Native culture, and that's not something to make fun of. It's something to be proud of and encourage."

Gross said the third "Sports Center" segment is a feature story on baseball's Midnight Sun Game, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in Fairbanks last month.

ESPN.com is also getting in on the "SportsCenter Across America" act. The Web site includes interactive maps, state-specific pages full of information and online polls.

A check of the Best of Alaska poll late Tuesday night produced its share of debatable results, such as UAF men's basketball team winning the 2002 Top of the World Classic as the state's most memorable sports moment or the NHL's Vancouver Canucks as the state's favorite pro team.

But keep in mind more than 74 percent of the 7,400-plus voters had never been to Alaska.

Daily News reporter Matt Nevala can be reached at mnevala@adn.com or 257-4335.

ON TV

WEIO: Want to see the "SportsCenter" featuring Alaska telecasts from WEIO? Watch ESPN (cable Channel 29) today at 2 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. and Friday morning at 1 a.m. and 8 a.m. It will also be televised today at 7 p.m. on ESPN2 (cable Channel 30). ON THE WEB: Check out ESPN's "SportsCenter Across America" at

sports.espn.go.com/chat/sportsnation/fiftyfifty/index
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Old 07-23-2005, 05:07 AM
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Default Grant preserves ancient village in Castalian Springs

Wednesday, 07/20/05

Grant preserves ancient village in Castalian Springs

By Zach Mills
Staff Writer



A federal grant from the National Park Service will allow the state to purchase a 130-acre historical site in Castalian Springs and preserve an ancient Native American village and burial ground.

The $329,250 Land and Water Conservation (LWCF) grant enables the state to receive matching federal funds for the purchase the 132.88 acres of land adjacent to the Wynnewood State Historical Site.

“What it does for Sumner County, it helps complete the area of history that was one of the earliest sites in Sumner County,” said John Garrott, president of the Bledsoe’s Lick Historical Association, Inc.

With the acquisition of the Native American site there will be about 300 acres of historical land in the area, Garrott said.

This historical acreage will create a “chance to have a very nice” historical center, he added.

The Wynnewood site is a 54.74-acre historical landmark managed by the the Bledsoe’s Lick Historical Association.

The state’s division of archeology will manage the 130-acres of the Leon Shoulders estate property where the Cheskeki Indian Village and historical mounds are located.

The site contains artifacts and burial mounds dating from A.D. 1000-1450.

Near this property is the Sumner County-owned Bledsoe’s Fort Historic Park and the Bledsoe’s Cemetery also managed by the Bledsoe’s Lick Historical Association consisting of a total of 76.68 acres.

“We have a great wealth of history right here,” said Doris Gilmore, treasurer of Bledsoe’s Lick Historical Association.

The grant, she said, gives Bledsoe’s a “great opportunity” to be involved in the preservation of the area.

“I think Sumner Countians don’t really know what we have,” Gilmore said.

The grant will allow the continued study and interpretation of the Native American site, Garrott said.

There was a similar site in Hendersonville, he added, but it was destroyed by development.

“It’s good that we are able to save this one,” Garrott said.

The earliest known excavations of the Native American site were conducted around 1820. More excavations were conducted in the late 1800s and early 1900s by William E. Myer, who later was associated with the Smithsonian Institute.

A significant amount of historical artifacts remain despite these early excavations. A recently completed water line excavation along Highway 25 between Governor Hall Road and Rock Springs Road found several domestic structures and intact burials.

“The prehistory Native Americans lived here a thousand plus years ago,” Garrott said. “The long hunters came here in the 1760s and came back to settle in the 1770s. The Stage Coach Inn was built in 1828. This land was occupied by the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. In the 1940s this was the training ground for the invasion force into France because it was so much like the French countryside.”

In 1964 Congress enacted the LWCF grant to provide conservation funds derived from receipts from oil and gas drilling on the Outer Continental Shelf. In addition to funding federal acquisition of authorized national parks and other conservation and recreation area, the LWCF also provides matching funds to state agencies and local communities known as state-side grants. These grants help state and local governments acquire, develop, improve and maintain outdoor recreation areas and open space.
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Old 07-23-2005, 05:10 AM
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Default Tribe trying to save sacred site

Tribe trying to save sacred site



Jul. 23, 2005 12:00 AM

I am writing on behalf of the Tohono O'odham Nation to offer our perspective regarding the lawsuit with the National Science Foundation.

Kitt Peak, known to the members of Tohono O'odham as I'itoi's Garden and called Iiolkam in the O'odham language, is in the Schuk Toak District of the Tohono O'odham Reservation. This mountain and Baboquivari Peak to the south of Kitt Peak are two of the most important religious and culturally significant sites to our nation.

In 1958, the U.S. government entered into a lease agreement with our elders allowing the National Science Foundation to locate observatories on Kitt Peak, with the understanding that the mountain is a sacred site. This lease arrangement carried the understanding that the foundation must comply with all relevant federal laws and regulations.

When the foundation proposed the construction and operation of the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System in 2003, the nation's expressed opposition to further development on Kitt Peak was ignored, and construction proceeded.

Construction proceeded despite the foundation's clear violation of two federal laws: the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act. The foundation refused to respond to the Tohono O'odham Nation, the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Arizona Historic Preservation Office, all of which requested that the foundation abide by the laws and cease construction.

After numerous requests, the foundation refused to comply with the law or to halt construction to consult with us. The nation was forced to take action to protect our sacred site, so we filed a lawsuit in federal district court. Since that time, the foundation has finally halted construction.

The nation, too, hopes for a successful resolution in a manner respectful of what's in our best interest and our desire not to further desecrate our mountain.

Vivian Juan-Saunders, Sells

The writer is chairwoman of the Tohono O'odham Nation.
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Old 07-23-2005, 02:39 PM
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Thank you , Wingy for bringing this all out. I am pleased to see so many who take an interest in human rights and who take a stand in social injustice.
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Old 07-24-2005, 11:03 AM
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I think what Cyndi had in mind when she started this thread....is more along the lines of actual First Nation reading material (i.e. written and researched by authenticated individuals).

Throughout history, it has been an accepted practice for others to "take" from the tribes and profit accordingly....with the advent of "New Age" ideology, this abuse is more rampant than ever.

The beliefs and ceremonies are sacred, and should not be used for financial gain by outsiders. This includes audio recordings, artwork, and literature (books).

I've learned a lot about the Native way from my fiance's Cherokee Brother (we are penpals), but no matter how much he teaches me, I will never be an expert or an authority. That's because I will never know that life, or the struggle of their people.

It reminds me of when "all thing Irish" really hit a boom about 8 or 9 years ago (Riverdance, Angela's Ashes, the McCourt brothers, et al). All of a sudden, anyone whose ancestors had even dated a culchie was all over it, pronouncing their association with the culture. As a true lass, this bothered me immensely.

So even as an outsider to their culture, I am offended for Native Americans. They continue to be victimized through stolen idealogy and false prophets.

Let's not allow that to happen here.

Just my opinion.
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Old 07-27-2005, 08:02 AM
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Default Indiana state prison

Hi all. I am new to this site, it is awsome. My husband (standing bear) is the spirtual leader of the circle at ISP in michigan city,Indiana. Anyone have a loved one there? Are they still on lockdown? Everyone have a great day...............
hopefully our loved ones in prison will too.
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Old 07-27-2005, 01:15 PM
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Default Caribbean Native Nations Join U.N. Permanent Forum

Caribbean Native Nations Join U.N. Permanent Forum

Indian Country Today, News Report, Jose Barreiro, Jul 26, 2005

A group of Caribbean indigenous nations gathered for special ceremonies and events in late May during the 4th United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, held in New York City. The indigenous movement in the Caribbean represents one of the lesser-known currents of Native cultural and political resurgence. This spring at the United Nations, the various delegations of Caribbean indigenous peoples coalesced in interesting and welcome ways.

For the first time in many years, Caribbean indigenous representatives were able to meet, share food and culture, and get down to the hard work of U.N. resolutions, interventions and document reaffirmation that marks much of international work. The Taino Nation of the Antilles, with primary bases in Puerto Rico and New York City, organized events for Caribbean delegates. It fund-raised the costs of one delegate from Dominica and coordinated presentations. Roberto Borrero, a Taino who serves on the NGO committee of the Indigenous Permanent Forum, also helped fund delegates to the event and has been active in hemispheric organizing. An Indigenous Peoples Caucus of the Greater Caribbean has been formed.

Carib cultural activist Prosper Paris, among others, joined the U.N. events. Prosper is from the Carib Territory in the north coast of the small Caribbean island of Dominica. He was one of several presenters on a panel on Indigenous Education and Cultural Survival organized by the Taino Nation. This writer chaired the panel, held at the customary indigenous gathering place in New York City: the United Nations Church Center at 777 United Nations Plaza, where several dozen Taino, Carib, Arawak, Guajiro and other indigenous peoples gathered.

The notable event, ably organized by Vanessa Pastrana, Inarunikia, among other volunteers from the Taino Nation, featured a dance presentation from young Taino people and recitations in the Taino language that are the product of a vigorous reconstruction and relearning of the insular Arawak language by members of that nation since the 1980s.

''From Cuba, in the mountains of the Sierra, from Dominican Republic, from our own Boriken [Puerto Rico], we have met relatives, holding on to our identity and retaking our indigenous roots,'' said Cacique Cibanakan, of the Taino Nation. ''Our hearts pound with excitement that our people are coming together.'' Indigenous delegates from all over the world arrive in New York City every spring for the now-permanent U.N. forum on Indigenous peoples' issues. There are always dozens if not hundreds of important and fascinating stories - both positive and negative - on the conditions of tribal peoples and on the always tortuous and troubled trajectory in the world of highly exploitative industries, with their rapacious hunger for indigenous lands and natural resources.

In too many cases, the political contentions of land and resources are accompanied by attacks on Native leaders and political and social structures. Quechua and Aymara from Bolivia and Ecuador, Kuna from Panama, Maya from Guatemala, northern Canadian Cree leaders, Lakota treaty chiefs and Haudenosaunee traditionalists from the United States and Saami from Norway, among many others, sustained a necessary dialogue on human rights and development through the work of U.N. gatherings.

In New York representing the Arawak community at Joboshirima in Venezuela, Chief Reginaldo Fredericks found a not-so-distant relative in Daniel Rivera, Wakonax, one of the active leaders in the Taino movement in Puerto Rico and the diaspora. The Arawak chief, who is Onishido Clan and lives mostly in the rain forest, was very happy to meet Taino relatives.

Among the messages carried by Fredericks from his people is the need to preserve and restore indigenous language. He commended the Taino language recovery program, developed by the nation's elder language advocate, Jose Laboy, Boriquex, and offered to help bring together the Arawak (Lokono) peoples wherever possible. ''It is wonderful we are more and more recognizing each other; we have a lot to offer each other,'' Rivera, who made an intervention at the United Nations on behalf of Caribbean Indian peoples, responded.

Of the many currents of indigenous movement across the Western Hemisphere, the Caribbean is the most hidden and marginalized. As communities, clans and nations coalesce, however, encounters such as the one at the United Nations in New York provide common ground for exchange and mutual education. The shared cultural history is fascinating.

Fredericks narrated stories of his people to the Taino Nation elder, which tell of six original Lokono (later Arawak) nations, which the chief called ''clans.'' Of the six ''clans,'' three are unaccounted for while Taino is in the process of vigorous cultural and social recovery.

According to Fredericks, the ancient Lokono tribes or clans were called Oralido, Cariafudo, Onishido ''rain people,'' Gimragi, Way'u, and the ''good people'' from the great islands (Taino). Today, ''as far as we know,'' the chief reported, only Onishido and Way'u survive on the mainland. The chief was most intrigued that hundreds and perhaps thousands of Taino descendants from the islands of the Greater Antilles are reaffirming themselves. The chief pointed to his headdress, which shows six feathers, symbolizing the six tribes or clans of the Lokono. ''The good island people, the Taino, are one of the six feathers,'' Fredericks reminded the other Caribbean delegates.

From La Guajira, Colombia, Karmen Ramirez represented the Way'u Morerat RJUWAT organization. She pointed out not only her Native Way'u nation, but also four tribes from Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta as Arawaks who originate with the Way'u of the Guajira Peninsula. It was another instance of people from common ancestors and linked contemporary identities meeting and recognizing each other as a result of an indigenous international movement. The Way'u, who also reside in neighboring Venezuela, are one of those peoples hurtfully divided by an international border.

Caribbean indigenous delegates, in the shadows for decades if not centuries, put their statements into the record at the annual U.N. event. The Caribbean indigenous caucus signaled the following major goal: ''That the collective rights of the indigenous peoples of the Greater Caribbean to lands, territories, resources, and traditional knowledge be enshrined in the Constitution of all Greater Caribbean countries and in other states where indigenous peoples exist.''
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Old 07-27-2005, 02:42 PM
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Tink!! Bozhoo and welcome to the NA forum!!! glad to have you aboard...I dunno who is from whhere really, I am from Mass, Aben aki and my husband is Potawatomie and a guest of the state of Indiana...

Glad you found us...I hope we can help each other and our loved ones in sharing and growing...

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Old 07-28-2005, 05:20 AM
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Default Science and religion: Scopes to Kennewick

Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - 12:00 AM

Editorial
Science and religion: Scopes to Kennewick


EIGHTY years after the Scopes trial dealt a blow to the anti-evolution movement, a similar face-off between science and religion is slated tomorrow in the U.S. Senate.

This time the issue is whether to preserve the right of science to discern the stories of the earliest Americans or to accede to beliefs of some Native American tribes that all ancient remains belong to them — even when there is no provable connection.

An action against science could stall the court-ordered study of Kennewick Man, the 9,300-year-old remains stored at the University of Washington's Burke Museum.

Science should win again.

The Senate Indian Affairs Committee hearing likely won't draw 1,000 spectators, as crowded around the Dayton, Tenn., courthouse for the trial of high-school teacher John Thomas Scopes, accused of illegally teaching evolutionary theory. But the debate no doubt will be as passionate as that rendered by William Jennings Bryan, for the prosecution, and Clarence Darrow, for the defense.

At issue now is whether to amend the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act with the addition of two words: "or was." So the act would redefine Native American to be "of, or relating to, a tribe, people, or culture that is ... or was ... indigenous to the United States."

That means modern-day tribes could claim the remains from ancient tribes that long since moved on or died out — even remains of their ancestors' foes.

The proposed change is in response to last year's unequivocal federal rulings that scientists should be able to study Kennewick Man. When the skeleton was found in 1996 on federal land, the government quickly moved to repatriate the remains to four tribes that claimed them. Eight leading scientists sued and won. This month, they are studying the remains for the first time.

The tribes argued their oral histories say they always have been in the Northwest and contain no references to visitors — contrary to scientific evidence of widespread migration.

The federal courts sided with science, finding none of the Act's required proof of a connection to the tribes. Republican Sen. John McCain's proposed amendment would remove that burden of proven affiliation.

Supporters of the change say it won't affect Kennewick Man's study, but that is disingenuous nonsense. If the amendment is enacted, a new claim could be filed on the grounds Congress clarified its intent. Regardless, it would apply to other ancient remains with no link to modern tribes.

Science won in 1925 when the Tennessee Supreme Court overturned Scopes' conviction and dismissed the case. But it could be losing in 2005. Anthropologists report many students are opting to do graduate work outside the United States because it is increasingly hard to get access to old bones.

The Indian Affairs Committee should follow the advice of Scopes, a willing scapegoat in the test case 80 years ago: "The best time to scotch the snake is when it starts to wiggle."

Copyright © 2005 The Seattle Times Company
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Old 07-28-2005, 05:24 AM
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Default Delegation urges Black Hills logging...When will they stop???

Delegation urges Black Hills logging

Members say following harvest plan would reduce fire risks

PETER HARRIMAN
pharrima@argusleader.com


Published: 07/25/05

South Dakota's congressional delegation told the highest ranking official in the U.S. Forest Service to cut more timber in the Black Hills National Forest.

During a July 20 meeting in the office of Sen. Tim Johnson, Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth and Rocky Mountain Region Forester Rick Cables heard Johnson, Sen. John Thune and Rep. Stephanie Herseth press them to complete by this fall the Phase 2 amendment to the forest plan. It would establish procedures for using logging to reduce fire and insect risks.

The members of Congress also urged that commercial logging in the forest be stepped up to the allowable sale quantity of 83 million board feet. The ASQ is the amount of timber forest managers believe can be annually harvested in a sustained yield program.

Before 1997, the ASQ for the Black Hills Forest was set at 118 MBF. In a forest plan revision that year, it was reduced to the present number. But timber harvest this decade has only averaged between 60-70 MBF annually.

"The trick is to find that fine line between adequate timbering and preservation of both the aesthetic and wildlife qualities of the Black Hills," Johnson said. "We do not want clear-cut forestry going on, and we do not want mountains denuded of their trees. But if we don't do something, all we are going to be left with are blackened fire remains."

Since 2000, wildfires have burned more than 180,000 of the forest's 1.2 million acres, and a bark beetle outbreak has killed thousands of trees in the northern Black Hills.

Thune characterized the meeting similarly.

"Everybody seemed to be pretty much on the same page. The delegation recognizes that forest health needs to be an issue they are concerned with," he said.

That unity resonated with the Forest Service officials.

"They wanted to impart to the chief and myself, perhaps more to the chief, how important it is to them and to their constituents to have the forest in as healthy a state as possible," Cables said after the meeting.

All parties at the meeting agreed that ambitious logging is needed in the Black Hills to reduce the density of trees prone to insect damage, disease and fire and to open up stands of ponderosa pine to allow other native plant species such as aspen to flourish, according to Tom Troxel, director of the Black Hills Forest Resource Association, a timber interest group.

"It was a good meeting," said Troxel, who attended. "I was delighted the three members of the delegation could come together. They were of one voice in talking to the chief, expressing their concerns and discussing their expectations. I thought it was a good two-way dialogue."

Troxel also called the make-up of the group "appropriate for the issues we were talking about."

But representatives of other Black Hills Forest users wish say they should have been included, and they take issue with the notion that commercial logging should be a major ingredient in the prescription to achieve a healthy forest.

Sam Clauson of Rapid City is chairman of the Sierra Club's Black Hills group.

"The Sierra Club hasn't changed our policy that we still strongly oppose all commercial timber sales. We think there are better ways of doing it," he said of reducing fire risk and improving the health of the forest. He added that the lightning-caused Ricco fire that burned across 3,900 acres near Piedmont this month burned through stands where timber has been harvested.

Nancy Kile of Sturgis represents Defenders of the Black Hills, an organization of about 600 founded in 2002 and primarily involved in articulating traditional Indians values regarding the Black Hills.

"I sure wish I would have been there," she said of the meeting in Johnson's office. Kile is an alternate member of the BHNF advisory council and finds it frustrating to attend council meetings where the worth of the forest is expressed in the dollar values of timber and tourism.

"Our people consider this a nurturing hospital, a generous pharmacy, a church, a funerary, but I don't hear anything like that when I go to these meetings. They just promote the corporate welfare," she said of timber harvests.

Such polarity is indicative of the management challenge the Forest Service faces on much of the 192 million acres of public land it oversees. The Black Hills highlights those issues to an even greater degree for a number of reasons. South Dakota is where the Forest Service cut its teeth on timber management. The first commercial timber sale on federal land anywhere in the U.S. took place on what was then the Black Hills Forest Reserve in 1899.

"The Black Hills is such a critical part of the history and culture of western South Dakota. Dale understands the tribal issues, the religious significance of the Black Hills to Native Americans, and he understands the history of the Black Hills, where the very first timber sale occurred," Cables said.

Thune suggested the checkerboard of public and private land ownership across the Black Hills makes the Forest Service acutely aware of how its activities are perceived by diverse neighbors.

"I think it is a fairly important forest to them because it is so habitated. It creates some unique challenges for them. Sometimes they learn some things from the activities, experiences and discussions that go on in the Black Hills, lessons that can be applied to other issues and challenges on other forests," he said.

Craig Bobzien has been BHNF supervisor fewer than two weeks, but he's been in the Forest Service since 1978 and has a sense of the BHNF's standing.

"The people really care. The public really cares," Bobzien said. "The Black Hills is a mecca for a lot of Americans."

A high public acceptance for that kind of intense management, reflected in the urging of the Congressional delegation to step up logging, encourages the Forest Service, according to Cables.

"The Black Hills is one of those places where it's win-win. We can have an active wood products industry, an active recreation program, a forest providing wildlife benefits," he said.

A couple of representatives of wildlife constituencies concur with Cables' vision.

"From our perspective, it's not a matter of how much they cut, it's how they cut it," said Doug Hanson, wildlife director for the South Dakota Department of Game Fish and Parks. "From a wildlife perspective, we've always advocated a more mosaic harvest."

Chris Hesla, Wildlife Federation director, said logging should be done in an environmentally friendly way.

Johnson and Thune said they are united in an effort to secure additional federal funding for the Forest Service to accomplish fire risk reduction goals in the Black Hills, and Cables is appreciative.

"The secret in the long term is to get the forest healthy," Cables says. "If we can get it healthy, we won't have to spend as much money on fire suppression. That's really been the thrust for the agency, to be really aggressive on fuels treatment nationally.

Reach Peter Harriman at 575-3615.
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Old 07-28-2005, 05:31 AM
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Default Where Did the American Indians Come From?...more theories <eyeroll>

Where Did the American Indians Come From?

Evidence shows the indigenous peoples of Asia and the Americas share a common ancestry

The scientists find yet another theory???…or why cant they make yup their mind???

As the ice ages came and went, the Berringia land bridge came and went, controlling the flow of immigrants from Asia and the Sunda land. It appears the first immigrants were Sunda people -- a Caucasoid-Negroid mix, and later arrivals were mainly Mongoloid.

Mitochondria DNA research on American Indians support the multiple migration theory. The Indians and people in Siberia and Korea have nearly identical genomes. However, the Indians have some genes that are not found among their Asian cousins. These "strange" genes are believed to be from the Sunda people now extinct. (Wikepedia, 2005)

Linguistic studies of 300 or so Indian languages indicate that they may have come from three or four ancestral languages. Strangely, these languages are more similar to Polynesian languages than to Asian languages. It is probable the earlier immigrants heavily influenced the later immigrants linguistically.




I have been living in an old Indian village called Snoqualmie (a corruption of the Indian word sdohkwahlb, meaning, "the moon") in Washington state. Since the Native Indians and I are believed to come from the same stock -- being Mongoloid and from Siberia -- I felt that I had a vested interest in these fellow Asians and did some research on the history of the Snoqualmie Indian tribe, where they came from and how they -- who owned much of the Seattle area -- have become almost extinct.

The Snoqualmie Indians

Since the Native Indians -- except the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayans -- had no written language, the written history goes back to the arrival of the white man in 1790. The newcomers were welcomed and trade flourished between the two camps until mid-1800, when the newly established United States began to exterminate the "Red Indians" and take over their land.

Within a generation, the Native Indians were killed off by whole-scale massacres, starvation, and epidemics brought in by the white settlers, and by the 1840s, the Indian population shrank to fewer than one tenth the population before the Caucasians arrived.

In 1848, the U.S. Congress established the Oregon Territory of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and parts of Montana and Wyoming. In 1855, the Snoqualmie tribe signed a treaty with the Big White Chief that effectively handed over their ancestral land to the white man.




White settlers forced Indians off their land -- supposedly protected by the Big White Chief, and the Indians were forced to move to barren shrublands. Finally, the Indians had had enough and took up arms to drive away the white invaders. Thus, the Puget Sound Indian War began in mid-September 1855 when Charles H. Mason, acting governor of the territory, Lt. William A. Slaughter and his men journeyed to Naches Pass to investigate a murder case. This act in turn roused the Indians into a rampage.

The last battle of the war was fought in March 1856 near Seattle. Lt. Gilmore Hays led a force of 100 men against about 150 Indian braves. The battle lasted all day and the poorly armed and led Indians were defeated, and the last armed resistance by the Native Indians was crushed. White settlers lynched Indians and the few survivors fled to the mountains. Today, only a handful pure-blood Indians survive.

White Indians?

The popular belief, based on genetics and archeological evidence, is that the Indians came to America from Asia when the North American continent was connected to the Eurasian continent through a land bridge (Berringia) exposed during the latest ice age some 11,000 to 26,000 year ago. It is believed Alaska and Canada were connected during the last ice age.

Archeological evidence suggests that humans lived in Brazil and Chile as early as 11,500 years ago, which means the migrants had passed over Berringia centuries earlier and gradually spread south on foot. (Until the white settlers came, the Native Indians had no horse or wheels for transport.) It is even possible that some of the early migrants came to America during an earlier ice age, 37,000 years ago, or even earlier.

Some scientists believe that Caucasians had arrived in boats eons before Mongoloids did. Mormons, who believe the Brown Indians wiped out the White Indians, promote the notion of White Indians.

The proponents of the White Indian theory claim migrants from Oceania arrived either by sailing across the Pacific or over the land route through Beringia at a much earlier date. The oldest human remains in South America resemble Australian Aborigines or the Negritos of southern and southeastern Asia or the Ainu of northern Japan.

Recently, an 8,900-year old skeleton, nicknamed the Kennewick Man, after the village of Kennewick in the state of Washington, has stirred up the controversy on the origin of the American Indians. Although the skeleton was discovered more than nine years ago by college students on the bank of the Columbia River, local Indian tribes filed legal actions to rebury the remains and had the boned locked up, preventing scientific examination.

Fortunately, the court ruled against the Indians recently and allowed anthropologists to examine the bones. (Chatters, 2005). The Kennewick Man shows Caucasian facial features. In fact, he bears an uncanny likeness to Egypt's Pharaoh Tutankhamun, also known as King Tut.

It is commonly believed that Egyptians are Caucasoid. However, closer examinations of King Tut and the Kennewick Man indicate that they are closer to the people of Oceania -- the Ainu, Polynesians, Australian Aborigines, and the Negritos -- a cross between Caucasoid and Negroid or perhaps hominids -- a mix of modern and ancient man -- before the differentiation into today's ethnic taxonomy.

The immigrants came to America in small groups of tens or so and scattered throughout the Americas in search of food. These bands remained largely isolated and grew into thousands of tribes with their own languages and customs.

Although most tribes eked out a subsistence living, some managed to develop advanced civilizations. The Maya, Olmec, Zapotec, Toltec, Aztec, Inca and some other tribes developed cities and states that were far more advanced than the contemporary European civilization.

Archaeological evidence in Australia, Melanesia, and Japan indicate "coastal" people who were neither Mongoloid, nor Caucasoid, nor Negroid, and who had their own physical characteristics populated the vast Sunda Shelf, now under water.

It is believed that some of these Sunda people migrated to America some 56,000 to 73,000 years ago during an earlier ice age. When the Sunda Shelf sank with deglaciation, some residents got stranded on isolated islands such as Japan, the Pacific islands, Australia, Egypt, and so on, while others moved inland and mixed with the native inland people.


Wingy's notes....for those of you who don't know...if science can come up with a theory, that all the scientists agree with, the government can take even more from the Indigenous People of Turtle Island. thankk goodnews theior huuuuuuuuuuuuuge ego's get in the way and the different scientists can't agree.

In case there is any question...this IS all about greed, ego, and power...of the governemnt.
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Old 07-28-2005, 05:37 AM
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Default Red Lake kids form youth council to improve life on reservation

Red Lake kids form youth council to improve life on reservation
by Tom Robertson, Minnesota Public Radio
July 26, 2005


Some of the Red Lake Indian Reservation's brightest young people are coming together to do what they can to tackle the tribe's problems.

Many people on the reservation say life is tough for kids. Poverty and unemployment are rampant. Drug and alcohol abuse is common, and the school's dropout rate is among the highest in the state.

Now, a group of kids has formed the Red Lake Nation Youth Council. Their goal is to make a better life for tribal youth.

Red Lake, Minn. — In a house outside the remote tribal village of Ponemah, two young men huddle around an Xbox playing a video game. Kirby Perkins, 16, and Jerrell Martin, 18, are typical teenagers. They're into sports, music and computers.

But Perkins and Martin are also worried about the future of their tribe. Martin says many kids are headed down the wrong path. He says the biggest problem is drugs and alcohol.

"I just want to help kids succeed in life, other than following the wrong peers," said Martin. "Even just so they can get a good appearance on Indians, too. Everyone says Indians are drunks and bad people. But we can't blame them for saying that about us, because the kids are the ones doing it to themselves."

Kirby Perkins and Jerrell Martin say they're tired of the turmoil. They decided to get involved in a fledgling organization called the Red Lake Nation Youth Council. The group's goal is to make life better for kids.

The Red Lake Nation Youth Council is a work in progress. The kids have barely settled on a name, and they're still working on bylaws and organizational structure. The group meets around a large wooden conference table at tribal headquarters, the same one used by tribal government leaders.

The council is the idea of Tribal Chairman Buck Jourdain. Planning began before the March 21 school shootings at Red Lake that left 10 people dead.

Tim Sumner, Jourdain's personal assistant, is also adviser to the youth council.

"We're trying to develop leaders, you know, upcoming leaders, whether it be in tribal government or anything that they do," Sumner said. "It's always good to prepare and teach yourself things for the life ahead of you."

Sumner, 20, is also from Ponemah. He says initially the idea was that the youth council would serve as advisers to tribal government. The group has since taken on a life of its own. Sumner says members are motivated to make real changes on the reservation.

"I think one of our main goals is just get out there and listen to them, see what they want, and what's helping them, and what we can do and what they can do to make things better for the youth on the Red Lake Reservation," Sumner said.

Kids join the youth council for a variety of reasons. Jim King, who will be a junior at Red Lake High School this fall, says one thing he'd like to see is for the youth council to bring in motivational speakers to talk with kids. He says many kids have no drive to succeed.

"I think that comes from the parents not having jobs and have no will to get up in the morning. So then their kids sleep right in with them. Then they wake up, get high with them, you know, then they're content with that," said King. "So I think if there are more jobs on the reservation, in the community, the parents would have more responsibility. Then it would trickle down to their kids."

Youth council member Tom Barrett agrees the economic situation at Red Lake is a big part of the problem.

"The employment rate is very high and that's where it starts," said Barrett. "That's where a person's personality in life starts, is at home. The probability is that if you didn't see your parents do anything or working, you know, it will make you think that you don't have to either."

Not every youth council member lives on the reservation. Debra Goodwin, 18, is a tribal member and lives in Bemidji. She just graduated from Bemidji High School.

But Goodwin says her heart has always been with her tribal community. She's the tribe's current Miss Red Lake Nation princess. Goodwin works as a certified nursing assistant at the elderly care facility in Red Lake.

Goodwin says she loves working with tribal elders, but she also cares for tribal youth. Goodwin says the March 21 school shootings broke her heart.

"It was just unbelievable," said Goodwin. "Words can't even say it, you know. My heart was just hurting because all these families had to deal with this. The thing that hurt me the most was that we did it to our own people, like Natives against Natives. This person did it to his own people."

Goodwin says it wasn't the shootings that motivated her to get involved in the youth council. She says the main problem at Red Lake is a breakdown in family structure. She says some parents need to do a better job with their kids.

"A lot of it has to do with them having kids at such young ages and not being ready to be parents themselves, so their kids end up failing," said Goodwin. "So, yeah, I believe that the parents did fail the kids. A lot of the parents don't ... care where they're going, they don't care what they're doing. So in a sense, when you don't have that, it's harder to succeed. It's harder to do good when you don't have those influences."

Goodwin credits Tribal Chairman Buck Jourdain with bringing a renewed focus on the well-being of kids. Jourdain is said to be the youngest chairman in the tribe's history. Goodwin says that helps him relate to the needs of young people.

"I strongly believe our former chairmen, they didn't give a sh** about our youth," she said. "They're like, 'Whatever, they're just disrespectful, blah, blah, blah, blah.' So that's why I'm so happy that he's our chairman."

Jourdain declined to be interviewed for this story. The chairman has been preoccupied with his own personal problems. His son Louis Jourdain, 17, is suspected of conspiracy in the high school shootings. The boy appeared before a federal judge in a closed hearing last week in St. Paul. Federal authorities have refused to talk about the case.

Goodwin has lots of ideas to help Red Lake kids. She'd like to see walking and biking trails along Red Lake, and maybe boat rentals. She'd like the youth council to set up and operate an ice cream shop to raise money. And since there are no band or choir programs at Red Lake High School, she'd like to find grant money to purchase musical instruments for kids.

Goodwin's mother, Sherry, works with Debra at the nursing home in Red Lake. Sherry Goodwin is excited about the youth council. She says there are plans to create a parents' advisory group to work with the kids.

Sherry Goodwin says she believes the youth council could potentially be much more effective at reaching out to kids than adults have been.

"I think just the peer pressure is there for them. I could go in there and say, 'Do this! Do that! And do this!' which they ain't going to listen to me," said Goodwin. "But when they get their own peers, their own age group, it's more apt to work for them. They can say, 'Hey, I know what it's like, I did it, I know it, but this is a better way and let's do it this way instead of that way.'"

Youth council members say the biggest challenge may be to get kids involved and engaged. The council is open to all youth on the reservation ages 15-24, but so far the meetings have attracted just a small core group. The kids plan to use flyers and the Internet to attract more members.
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Default Cherokee Nation makes donation to local agencies

Cherokee Nation makes donation to local agencies

By Bob Gibbins, Press Staff Writer
Friday, July 22, 2005 6:09 PM CDT


Two local law enforcement agencies got thee proverbial shot in the arm this week and will move closer to scoring departmental goals, thanks to the Cherokee Nation.

The Cherokee County Sheriff's Office and Tahlequah Police Department received donations from the tribe. District 1 Tribal Councilors Bill John Baker and Audra Conner presented checks Thursday to Sheriff Norman Fisher and Police Chief Steve Farmer.

Farmer intends to use the $20,000 gift to purchase two drug dogs for the department and equip a department vehicle for transporting the dogs. Fisher will use the $25,000 the CN gave his agency to buy accessories for the new patrol cars the department purchased earlier this year.

The grants will allow both departments to accomplish their goals more quickly than they originally anticipated.

"I want to thank Bill John and Audra for thinking of the sheriff's office," Fisher said. "Our budget is tight, and this should help us get those new cars out there quicker than we thought."

Farmer may have had the money in the TPD budget for one drug dog, but will now be able to get two dogs to work with the officers in narcotics investigations. He intends to begin procuring the animals right away.

Baker said the monies have been accumulating for the past three years through tribal tag sales. He Conner chose to pool their money and give it to the police department and sheriff's office. The Cherokee Nation has already been giving hundreds of thousands of dollars to schools within the 14 counties of its jurisdiction.

"We know there are other important areas, like law enforcement, and we don't want them to be less prepared," Baker said. "They protect Cherokee people and our housing projects."

The council has said it would use the money in the communities.


"It's time for us to pay the piper and do what we said," Baker said.



Conner said she, too, is glad to provide the assistance to local law enforcement.

Baker said drugs are a major problem within the Cherokee Nation, and anything the tribe can do to help in the fight is a positive measure. He said helping equip vehicles in the sheriff's office is also important because the new cars will aid deputies in safely getting to calls to assist both tribal and non-tribal members.

Farmer said funds for the drug dogs will also help the schools, which can now work with the police department when they need one on campus, rather than securing one with their own budgets.

"Our current fleet of vehicles is not in good shape," Fisher said. "Hopefully, with this assistance from Cherokee Nation, we can get some new, better-equipped cars on the street."
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Default A federal judge rejects appeal by imprisoned Native American activist Leonard

Activist's appeal of sentencing fails

Judge: Peltier not above federal laws

DAVE KOLPACK
Associated Press


July 23, 2005
FARGO - A federal judge has rejected an appeal by imprisoned Native American activist Leonard Peltier, who said the government did not have right to sentence him for killing two federal agents in 1975.

Peltier's lawyer, Barry Bachrach, said federal laws did not apply to Peltier because FBI agents Ronald Williams and Jack Coler were killed in Indian Country. Peltier was convicted in Fargo in 1977, and was sentenced to two consecutive life terms.

U.S. District Judge Ralph Erickson denied the appeal, saying the government has the right to prosecute people who kill federal agents, no matter where the crimes occur. Williams and Coler were shot in the head at point-blank range after being injured in a shootout on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

The appeal was one of several in the 30-year-old case.

"I'm the sixth U.S. attorney (in North Dakota) since Leonard Peltier murdered FBI agents Coler and Williams in cold blood," federal prosecutor Drew Wrigley said. "Somewhere out there, there's some law student who isn't even thinking about being a U.S. attorney who's going to be doing the same thing I'm doing."

Bachrach was not immediately available for comment.

In a hearing in Fargo last month, Bachrach said the federal court had no jurisdiction on the reservation.

Erickson wrote that Congress has the power to pass laws to "provide for the punishment of all crimes and offenses against the United States," whether within one of the states or in Indian Country.

Peltier, 60, spoke briefly by speakerphone during the hearing. He complained that the government has changed its story about his role in the killings.

Peltier, who suffers from diabetes and other ailments, was moved earlier this month from a federal prison in Leavenworth, Kan., to a prison in Terre Haute, Ind.

Wrigley expects more appeals.

"We're going to continue to fight the baseless claims to turn back the conviction that was a just one and decided nearly 30 years ago," he said.
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Default Indian reservation struggles with illegal immigrants

Indian reservation struggles with illegal immigrants

By ANGIE WAGNER
Associated Press writer

TOHONO O'ODHAM NATION, Ariz. -- When the scorching daylight fades and dusk drifts into this Indian reservation, the Sonoran Desert begins to rustle. Mesquite trees become hide-outs, and the deep washes turn into human freeways filled with illegal immigrants winding their way over worn trails that will carry them into America.

They move at night, when it's cooler and the moon's glow can guide them from Mexico onto an Indian nation so vast that many easily slip through a flimsy barbed wire fence unnoticed.

"It's like the desert doesn't sleep," tribal police officer Darrell Ramon says, peering into the night as he drives through the nation's isolated communities. "It wakes up at night. Bodies start moving out there. You see headlights way in the desert."

Despite a strong Border Patrol presence, the immigrants still come.


It's easier here, they say. Here, they find tribal police officers who are overwhelmed. Money is scarce for this tribe, and there is little help from the federal government.

The Tohono O'odham people are tired -- exhausted with truckloads of immigrants trashing their land, raiding their homes and stealing their cars. The flow never stops. Not in a place that shares 75 vulnerable miles of the U.S.-Mexican border.

Deep into the Sonoran, Ramon drives over hilly dirt roads riddled with potholes, never sure of what he will find. Often, it's a group of exhausted immigrants waiting for their ride to freedom. Or lost, disoriented men who find their way to the main roads, begging for help. Occasionally, a family out of food and water. Then there are the bodies. Last year, 51 people succumbed to the pounding Arizona heat.

"It's an everyday thing out here. It's constant from sundown to sunup," he said.

Indian County makes up only 2 percent of the country, but tribal lands encompass more than 260 miles of international borders. Thirty-six tribes have lands that are close to or cross over international boundaries with Mexico or Canada.

Tens of thousands of illegal immigrants cross these borders and disappear into the heart of Indian Country each year, according to the National Congress of American Indians.

And tribes feel they are on their own, left with easy routes into America and not enough money to do a job the government should be doing.

This reservation is part of the Border Patrol's Tucson sector -- the busiest place in the country for illegal border crossings. Last year, more than 491,000 illegal immigrants were arrested in this area. Combined with arrests in Yuma to the west, the numbers make up more than half of all immigrants arrested in the entire country.

But many -- Indians say most -- are never caught.

+++3.

There are 24,000 Tohono O'odham members, and 14,000 live here on the reservation. Forty percent live in poverty and many members still lack basics such as running water and electricity. Obesity and diabetes are rampant. Unemployment is 42 percent, and only 52 percent of students graduate from high school.

Each year the tribe spends more than $3 million dealing with illegal immigrant activity, from finding immigrants, offering medical help and paying for autopsies to hauling away trash and abandoned vehicles. Immigrants take up 60 percent of the tribe's law enforcement time.

The tribe would rather spend all that money and time on health care, education and housing.

From 2001 to 2004, the tribe received $310,613 for homeland security planning, training and equipment purchases. This year, the Interior Department gave the tribe $1.3 million to help control immigration, not even half of what the tribe will spend.

"We're bending over backwards to help the United States, to protect the public, and we're not getting any help," said tribal Chairwoman Vivian Juan-Saunders. "If this happened in any other area of the country, it would be viewed as a crisis. But it's the fact that it's in Indian Country."

Arizona's governor and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., have also complained about the lack of funding, with McCain calling it "disgraceful."

Yet McCain also said the money has to be given where the greatest risk is, "and the greatest risk is not a lot of Indian reservations."

The trouble began for the Tohono O'odham people when the government started cracking down on illegal immigration into California and Texas in 1993.

With more agents and helicopters on duty, smugglers had to find other routes. They were forced onto remote federal and tribal lands, where they know there are fewer resources and more chances to slip across the border.

"These individuals are going to use the covers of darkness, the shadows of the deep canyon," said Mario Villarreal, spokesman for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection. "That's why they move to these isolated portions of the border."

The result is a land overrun with immigrants. The Tohono O'odham estimate 1,500 people each day cross the border into their reservation. Last year, more than 400,000 pounds of marijuana were seized and 141 immigrants died in the Tucson sector, according to the Border Patrol.

More than 2,300 Border Patrol agents are assigned to the Tucson area, up about 800 agents from 2000. By the end of the year, 534 agents will be added to the Arizona border.

The tribe and the Border Patrol often have a love-hate relationship. Tribal members want the Border Patrol to do its job, but tire of the constant helicopters and getting stopped on their way back and forth across the border, where the Tohono O'odham's land extends. They also say the Border Patrol shouldn't have access to the tribe's sacred sites.

But the head of the Border Patrol's union said the tribe is a difficult partner and could help itself more.

"They need to make a decision whether they want to be part of the team or treat themselves as a foreign nation," said T.J. Bonner, president of the National Border Patrol Council.

+++2.

When the desert turns to black and Royetta Thomas rounds the corner to her street in the tiny community of Miguel, she shudders at what she might find. Her house backs up to the Sonoran, and immigrants often use her spigot to get water. Twice, her house was broken into, her window broken, and food, shoes and jewelry stolen.

This is the burden of living in the path of the busiest border crossing area in the country.

"Now it's like you don't even know who's watching you," she said from her front yard. "I'm just wondering what's next? We have no privacy."

Everyone here has similar stories: The time immigrants were found hiding in a large trash bin, waiting for their ride, or when immigrants stole clothes from a clothes line so they could look American. One brave soul swiped food off the stove as it cooked.

Many say they struggle with how much to help desperate immigrants, and the tribe even battles its own members who can't resist easy money for hauling a load of immigrants or drugs. Last year, more than 130 tribal members were arrested for smuggling.

+++1.

A strange lull has settled on the reservation in the past few weeks. Unusual, Saraficio said. But it won't be for long. They've probably just moved to another spot.

Then, almost out of nowhere, an immigrant emerges up ahead along the edge of state Highway 86. He is Jose Gonzalez, a 44-year-old father of five from Acambay, Mexico. He wears new hiking shoes, a worn backpack and a grin. For four days, he walked off and on to reach America along with 11 other people. They got separated, and Gonzalez was robbed of almost all the $1,200 he was to pay the smuggler.

He planned to make his way to Chicago and work as a landscaper. Now he is thirsty, hungry and giving up. The Border Patrol whisks him away to be sent back home.

But, he says, he will try again next week.

The officer eases back into his SUV and heads back out into the night, knowing there will always be another just like Jose Gonzalez.

For the Tohono O'odham, it has become a way of life.

Angie Wagner is the AP's Western regional writer, based in Las Vegas.

On the Net:

Homeland Security: http://www.dhs.gov/dhspublic/

Border Patrol: http://www.cbp.gov/
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Default an apology

I wanted to apologise, especially to Mia, for not being more specific with the tital of this thread...I neglected to make it clear, that I thought the books written by our people and other indigenous people, with whom we share similar struggles, wisdom and issues should be what our focus here.

Thanks Mia, for your patience with me...and for pointing, so very sensitively, that my qassuptions are not everyones...you alll know where the word assume came from, right?

ASSUME to make (when one assumes something) an

ass (of) u (and) me

please note...I am always open to your ideas and critisism...above all I am a student...and i look to everyone I meet as my teacher...

Thanks, Mia, for taking the time....
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingy
I wanted to apologise, especially to Mia, for not being more specific with the tital of this thread...I neglected to make it clear, that I thought the books written by our people and other indigenous people, with whom we share similar struggles, wisdom and issues should be what our focus here.

Thanks Mia, for your patience with me...and for pointing, so very sensitively, that my qassuptions are not everyones...you alll know where the word assume came from, right?

ASSUME to make (when one assumes something) an

ass (of) u (and) me

please note...I am always open to your ideas and critisism...above all I am a student...and i look to everyone I meet as my teacher...

Thanks, Mia, for taking the time....
No problem Wingy. I think your new title is much more clear now.
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Default RCMP ignored 911 call before woman's slaying

RCMP ignored 911 call before woman's slaying

Last Updated Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:05:27 EDT

CBC News

A woman slain in the northern Alberta town of High Prairie telephoned 911 for help, but the RCMP did not respond to the emergency call, CBC News has learned.

Brenda Moreside, 44, was stabbed to death in February in her home in the city, nearly 300 kilometres northwest of Edmonton. Her common-law husband, Stanley Willier, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder.

The 911 call came shortly before 6 a.m. on Feb. 13, 2005.

According to a classified briefing to the Commissioner of the RCMP obtained by CBC News, Moreside was calling for help.

She told the operator that Willier was drunk and breaking through the window of their home.

The briefing note indicates that Moreside said she didn't want to deal with Willier.

She asked again for help, but the police never turned up.

Now Moreside's children are wondering whether their mother's death could have been prevented.

RCMP spokesperson Corporal Wayne Oakes said the force is doing a complete internal investigation.

Copyright ©2005 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation - All Rights Reserved
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