Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > U.S. REGIONAL FORUMS > FEDERAL PRISON SYSTEM > Federal Prison Self Surrendering Information
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Federal Prison Self Surrendering Information Information about Federal Prisons and Self-Surrendering to the BOP.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-02-2016, 09:17 PM
ttexrbomb ttexrbomb is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 349
Thanks: 7
Thanked 217 Times in 113 Posts
Default Self Surrender Checklist - What to do before you surrender

For those of you who have the opportunity to self surrender I wanted to put together a checklist of things to do before you surrender and immediately after you turn yourself in. This will hopefully make it so you are at least comfortable in those dreaded early days.

Before you go in:
-Look up inmate magazine services. A lot of them can take up to 6 weeks to start, so start early and by the time you get there, your magazines will follow shortly thereafter.
-Start a newspaper mail subscription. They are a little pricy but worth it if you want to keep up on the outside world.
-Compile a list of important addresses and telephone numbers and prepare to mail them to yourself the day before.
-They sell MP3 players. Make a list of your favorite songs so you'll have them available to you when you arrive and buy an MP3 player.
-Know your BOP number and prepare to stock your inmate account with money. That way when you get there, you'll be ready for commissary.
-Mail yourself any important documents you may need on the inside (you determine what hide are but keep in mind they may not deliver those to you).
-Go on Amazon.com and find books you will read and save them to a folder. That way somebody on the outside can order them for you.
-Buy a prepaid cell phone and set it up with a phone number for an area code that is local to your prison. Or you can change your number to a local number. Google Voice may work as well (at Sheridam this was allowed, but YMMV).
-Execute a power of attorney.
-If you are a VA disability recipient and your time is more than 60 days, file for an apportionment of your benefits to a spouse or child. Otherwise they will drop you to 10%. But an apportionment allows you to designate a family member to receive the benefits.
-Get a list of your current medications from your doctor and mail it to yourself. You can try to bring it with you, but just in case, mail it. Medical records supporting any medication you are on would be helpful as well, though they don't have to listen. But it's best to have them just in case they do.

When you arrive:
-You will get a document with your phone code and PIN number from your counselor. Seek this form out ASAP. That way you can call home as soon as possible. I did this and got it the same day. Had I not, I would have had to wait 5 days with no email or phone. When you are away for the first time, seconds can seem like forever.
-Remember, this too will pass. The hardest day is the first day.

Best of luck.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-03-2016, 09:44 AM
yourself yourself is online now
attorney
 

Join Date: May 2010
Location: around
Posts: 12,147
Thanks: 4,407
Thanked 22,344 Times in 7,758 Posts
Default

Um, you need to do a lot more than this. Seriously.

Cancel your insurances to things you are not using - car, health, etc. DO NOT CANCEL LIFE INSURANCE

Have a complete physical, see an optometrist (and get your prescription), same for hearing.

See your dentist and get all of your dental work done.

If your sentence is under the time limit for your driver's license, renew your driver's license. Renew your passport. It's always helpful to have valid ID that's not emblazoned with your inmate number and DOC all over it.

Have a sit-down with your bank. Find out what they need to deal with accounts and whether you should make accounts joint or close accounts. Make sure they know who's going to do the leg work for you when inside, and give them a copy of your POA

Make sure your POA is for your state. There are a lot of free forms out there, but POAs are State Specific. You need the one for your state. Further, if there's a POA for medical in your state, execute one of those as well. If there's a POA for psych in your state, execute one of those, too. And while you're at it, update your will. With every life change or every 5 years, you need to sit down with your estates lawyer and update your will. Incarceration counts as a major life change, so update your will.

While you're at your doctor's office, execute a HIPAA release. They are usually good for 6 months and will allow you to have relevant records sent to the BOP (sorry, forgot you're talking federal, what with self surrender. Most of the people I deal with are state, so excuse me if I say DOC here and there).

Make sure you talk with your estates attorney or family lawyer (they are usually one and the same and not me, your criminal lawyer) about such things as child support and alimony obligations. Frequently, your obligations can be diminished assuming your income diminishes while you're in prison, so take care of that stuff now, so it can be executed as you become incarcerated.

Speaking of children, make sure your visitation agreement addresses your incarceration. You are entitled to continue to participate in your children's lives, along with making major decisions for them (participate in those decisions, not dictate those decisions). Make sure you're getting report cards, that you're getting updates from religious schools, and whatnot - this may involve talking with the schools if your co-parent isn't very good at co-parenting. Set up a time and date where you talk with your kids, and make sure you start mail with them so they can send you stuff and you can send them stuff. Take a list of your kids' birthdates with you. You are not absolved from missing those days just because you can't go to their birthday party or buy them the toy they want.

You also aren't absolved of knowing when your spouse's birthday is, or your parents, or your anniversaries. Take a list of all dates with you and make sure you have somebody who will send those dates to you when you are inside.

Make a list and share it with your POA about the stuff that's going to need to be done while you're inside - taxes, the sale of your car, the storage of your stuff. If you're going in for more than a year or two, get rid of your clothes. They will be out of style when you get out anyway.

Cancel your credit cards.

Make a list of user names and passwords for things like FaceBook and email and PTO. Cancel what needs to be cancelled. Keep what should be kept.

Storage - store your stuff, but also pay to have a safe deposit box at the bank for important papers. Pay up front for the full duration of your sentence. Give the key to somebody who will hold it for you or take it with you to prison so it can be put in your property. Know that at least one other person needs signatory rights to that box incase one of those documents is needed. Make that decision as well.

Start the visitor background checks for anybody who you want visits with. Get the forms online and give them to those people. Do not force them to fill them out, just tell them you'd like them to do so in the event that they can visit.

Older kids have a very difficult time with a parent in prison, as do younger siblings. Giving them something to be responsible for - ball scores for a favorite team, keeping track of new movies that come out and whether you should see them together when you get out, shared interests in gardening, whatever, can help. So can making them responsible for things you truly value like your watch, or your ring, or your favorite football jersey, can really help them with this transition. Reading to your kids is also important, so making a video of you reading their favorite bedtime story (assuming they're that age) can help them. Reading a book with a high schooler can also help that kid, especially when that book is part of their English curriculum.

Know that the fastest route to poverty is to have a parent in prison. Talk with your spouse about it - know your budget and do your budget with him/her. Talk about making concessions - do you sell the house? How do you make up for the deficit in income? Let your spouse know that whatever s/he needs to do to provide for him/her and the kids is the right thing. Know that things will be different when you get back.

There's more, but it's Saturday, and my brain isn't quite functioning. But do see your doctor and your dentist. Get a full STD panel from your doc, and talk about vaccines like for Hepatitis, and the like. Make sure your doc knows where you're going to be and for how long.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to yourself For This Useful Post:
Minor activist (12-31-2016)
  #3  
Old 09-03-2016, 09:54 AM
ttexrbomb ttexrbomb is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 349
Thanks: 7
Thanked 217 Times in 113 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yourself View Post
Um, you need to do a lot more than this. Seriously.

Cancel your insurances to things you are not using - car, health, etc. DO NOT CANCEL LIFE INSURANCE

Have a complete physical, see an optometrist (and get your prescription), same for hearing.

See your dentist and get all of your dental work done.

If your sentence is under the time limit for your driver's license, renew your driver's license. Renew your passport. It's always helpful to have valid ID that's not emblazoned with your inmate number and DOC all over it.

Have a sit-down with your bank. Find out what they need to deal with accounts and whether you should make accounts joint or close accounts. Make sure they know who's going to do the leg work for you when inside, and give them a copy of your POA

Make sure your POA is for your state. There are a lot of free forms out there, but POAs are State Specific. You need the one for your state. Further, if there's a POA for medical in your state, execute one of those as well. If there's a POA for psych in your state, execute one of those, too. And while you're at it, update your will. With every life change or every 5 years, you need to sit down with your estates lawyer and update your will. Incarceration counts as a major life change, so update your will.

While you're at your doctor's office, execute a HIPAA release. They are usually good for 6 months and will allow you to have relevant records sent to the BOP (sorry, forgot you're talking federal, what with self surrender. Most of the people I deal with are state, so excuse me if I say DOC here and there).

Make sure you talk with your estates attorney or family lawyer (they are usually one and the same and not me, your criminal lawyer) about such things as child support and alimony obligations. Frequently, your obligations can be diminished assuming your income diminishes while you're in prison, so take care of that stuff now, so it can be executed as you become incarcerated.

Speaking of children, make sure your visitation agreement addresses your incarceration. You are entitled to continue to participate in your children's lives, along with making major decisions for them (participate in those decisions, not dictate those decisions). Make sure you're getting report cards, that you're getting updates from religious schools, and whatnot - this may involve talking with the schools if your co-parent isn't very good at co-parenting. Set up a time and date where you talk with your kids, and make sure you start mail with them so they can send you stuff and you can send them stuff. Take a list of your kids' birthdates with you. You are not absolved from missing those days just because you can't go to their birthday party or buy them the toy they want.

You also aren't absolved of knowing when your spouse's birthday is, or your parents, or your anniversaries. Take a list of all dates with you and make sure you have somebody who will send those dates to you when you are inside.

Make a list and share it with your POA about the stuff that's going to need to be done while you're inside - taxes, the sale of your car, the storage of your stuff. If you're going in for more than a year or two, get rid of your clothes. They will be out of style when you get out anyway.

Cancel your credit cards.

Make a list of user names and passwords for things like FaceBook and email and PTO. Cancel what needs to be cancelled. Keep what should be kept.

Storage - store your stuff, but also pay to have a safe deposit box at the bank for important papers. Pay up front for the full duration of your sentence. Give the key to somebody who will hold it for you or take it with you to prison so it can be put in your property. Know that at least one other person needs signatory rights to that box incase one of those documents is needed. Make that decision as well.

Start the visitor background checks for anybody who you want visits with. Get the forms online and give them to those people. Do not force them to fill them out, just tell them you'd like them to do so in the event that they can visit.

Older kids have a very difficult time with a parent in prison, as do younger siblings. Giving them something to be responsible for - ball scores for a favorite team, keeping track of new movies that come out and whether you should see them together when you get out, shared interests in gardening, whatever, can help. So can making them responsible for things you truly value like your watch, or your ring, or your favorite football jersey, can really help them with this transition. Reading to your kids is also important, so making a video of you reading their favorite bedtime story (assuming they're that age) can help them. Reading a book with a high schooler can also help that kid, especially when that book is part of their English curriculum.

Know that the fastest route to poverty is to have a parent in prison. Talk with your spouse about it - know your budget and do your budget with him/her. Talk about making concessions - do you sell the house? How do you make up for the deficit in income? Let your spouse know that whatever s/he needs to do to provide for him/her and the kids is the right thing. Know that things will be different when you get back.

There's more, but it's Saturday, and my brain isn't quite functioning. But do see your doctor and your dentist. Get a full STD panel from your doc, and talk about vaccines like for Hepatitis, and the like. Make sure your doc knows where you're going to be and for how long.
These are great points as well. Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-31-2016, 11:30 AM
Free At Last 5 Free At Last 5 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: KY, USA
Posts: 237
Thanks: 58
Thanked 455 Times in 178 Posts
Default

All of the points made in this thread are excellent. Get the ones I most important to you done, and don't sweat the rest - it's an imperfect journey. Be prepared for the emotional pain of saying goodbye - it's a moment you'll never forget, but it will be topped by the day you walk out those same doors, which will happen too. Check with the prison on what you will be allowed to take in, which will be next to nothing. This is why it's so important to mail in a lot of the information previously mentioned. It's most important to send money in advance to your account, and as a backup, most prisons will also deposit cash, so bring funds with you as well in case the posting of money is delayed. Be prepared for a welcome that is not warm from staff - it just comes with the territory, toughen up. One last thing that someone shared with me before going in - there is always a chance that you may be first taken to the SHU, essentially the jail within the federal prison, so just know that if that happens, that's NOT what your prison experience will be like for the rest of your stay. The first night and morning are rough for anybody. Thousands came before you, and thousands will come after. Just keep the faith that your time too will pass.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-04-2017, 03:45 PM
Free At Last 5 Free At Last 5 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: KY, USA
Posts: 237
Thanks: 58
Thanked 455 Times in 178 Posts
Default Self Surrender Notification Tip - Check BOP Locator

One more tip on self surrender: if you are waiting on your notification letter, you can search for yourself by name using the BOP Inmate Locator, and you may show up as "in transit" before you receive notification. It's a great way to Get your inmate ID number, which then allows you to get money in your account prior to arrival. Fair warning - it's a sinking feeling to see yourself appear there! On the other hand, it's progress, because you can't knock a day off your sentence until you actually start serving it.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Delayed Surrender and/or Self Surrender Kybred4492 Headed to Prison 8 01-15-2011 05:44 PM
Self surrender!! FederalProp1987 Federal Prison Self Surrendering Information 4 11-24-2010 04:22 PM
Self surrender becky1027 Federal Prison Self Surrendering Information 5 04-02-2009 06:52 PM
Self Surrender abagurl Carswell Federal Prisons 6 01-09-2009 07:29 AM
Self Surrender Checklist newbie2006 Federal General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat 6 01-06-2008 11:16 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:04 PM.
Copyright © 2001- 2019 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics