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  #1  
Old 02-17-2018, 05:02 PM
Halo527 Halo527 is offline
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Default Time article on long prison sentences

There is an excellent article written in Time Magazine about how long sentences do not work and why the way the courts base these sentences is not correct. My son is currently dealing with a DA who has vengeance in her heart for him, so I find the article interesting. Also, it does show that there is an awareness that there is a problem with the way we incarcerate people in the US. It gives me hope that maybe the system can change and bring our loved ones home sooner. I am unable to post the link as I am new to the site, but you can find it at time.com under incarceration-report.
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Old 02-17-2018, 06:53 PM
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Michael Santos said that after the first twenty years of his sentence it wasn't even working as punishment. He got so used to it all that it just seemed like normal life.
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Old 05-15-2018, 09:47 PM
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It's true. Especially when many are sentenced at a very young age for these life or nearly life sentences. The lesson is learned and then lost as they just become hardened and institutionalized. They only hold them for so long because there's money in it for them.
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Old 05-16-2018, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by epicbeyouty View Post
They only hold them for so long because there's money in it for them.
You hit the nail on the head. From the time of the 13th amendment and on, imprisoning people has been a source of cheap/free labor for the state and businesses, as well as profiteers who drain the incarcerated person's support systems resources as well.
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Old 05-16-2018, 04:55 PM
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I didn't locate the Time article, but here is a similar article:

The myth behind long prison sentences

Does spending ‘100 years’ behind bars actually help deter crime? BBC Future explores the impact of long prison sentences, and looks at how Norway is taking an opposite approach.

In December 2017, a Thai man named Phudit Kittitradilok was convicted of swindling 2,400 people out of 574 million baht (£13 million) in a Ponzi scheme that promised high return investments.

He was sentenced to a staggering 13,275 years in jail – an amount of time longer than the entire Neolithic era. But in actuality, thanks to Thailand’s penal code that limits prison sentences, Kittitradilok will only end up serving 20 years.

Still, there’s something about the idea of a long prison term that gives the impression that justice is being served. And while Kittitradilok’s case was mostly optics, plenty of people around the world really do spend their whole lives behind bars.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2018...es-deter-crime
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Old 05-16-2018, 09:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patchouli View Post
I didn't locate the Time article, but here is a similar article:

The myth behind long prison sentences

Does spending ‘100 years’ behind bars actually help deter crime? BBC Future explores the impact of long prison sentences, and looks at how Norway is taking an opposite approach.

In December 2017, a Thai man named Phudit Kittitradilok was convicted of swindling 2,400 people out of 574 million baht (£13 million) in a Ponzi scheme that promised high return investments.

He was sentenced to a staggering 13,275 years in jail – an amount of time longer than the entire Neolithic era. But in actuality, thanks to Thailand’s penal code that limits prison sentences, Kittitradilok will only end up serving 20 years.

Still, there’s something about the idea of a long prison term that gives the impression that justice is being served. And while Kittitradilok’s case was mostly optics, plenty of people around the world really do spend their whole lives behind bars.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2018...es-deter-crime
Great article, as are the others on the site. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 05-21-2018, 03:23 AM
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Prison is the only adult life my husband has ever known. He's 36 now and been dealing with the system since he was 20.
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Old 05-21-2018, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
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Prison is the only adult life my husband has ever known. He's 36 now and been dealing with the system since he was 20.
I'm sorry, that's an awful long sentence for a young man.
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Old 05-23-2018, 03:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halo527 View Post
I'm sorry, that's an awful long sentence for a young man.
Sadly he has "to life" meaning it's theoretically possible he will never get out.

However he was just in community corrections (in a halfway house, not technically on parole yet) but they banned me from talking to him most of the time he was there and his anxiety went through the roof and he started forgetting assignments and they failed him. He had a hearing from the community corrections board, he can reapply after his next parole hearing (September) and try to get into the other halfway house in town/ different treatment provider who will probably be more understanding and let him keep me in his life. They were literally shocked at how he was treated. So I do think he'll be out again pretty soon, and if I can stay in his life (we're married) then he shouldn't have problems this time around.
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Old 05-23-2018, 11:39 AM
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Here's a link to another great article put out by the Prison Policy Initiative. Good to know that people are doing something about mass incarceration!


https://www.prisonpolicy.org/reports/pie2017.html
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