Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > U.S. REGIONAL FORUMS > ALABAMA > Alabama Prison & Criminal Justice News & Events
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Alabama Prison & Criminal Justice News & Events Current news items and information on events related to the Alabama prison system.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-14-2003, 04:03 PM
danielle's Avatar
danielle danielle is offline
The Specialist - Surf but be-ware!
 

Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 9,043
Thanks: 4
Thanked 101 Times in 33 Posts
Thumbs down Women inmates transferred from Alabama to Louisiana

Has anybody heard from the families of these prisoners? What's happened to them? There needs to be some press! This is supposed to be temporary, but nothing temporary ever happens in Alabama!
__________________
Monica Danielle
***********
On September 22, 2003, my better half came home after 657 days in an Alabama prison!!!

And he's now forever free - passing away from this life and into the next - on January 9, 2010.

My Sweet Wayne
January 21, 1954 - January 9, 2010

I'll always love you.

Last edited by danielle; 04-14-2003 at 07:03 PM..
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-14-2003, 06:02 PM
vlcoffman vlcoffman is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Theodore, Ala
Posts: 279
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Angry Inmates Transferred out of state

Posted 12:30 a.m. (CDT)
BREAKING NEWS
Inmates moved to Louisiana prison
The Alabama Department of Corrections transferred 70 female inmates from Julia Tutwiler Prison near Wetumpka late Sunday night to a private facility in Louisiana. The inmates were allowed to make a call to let family members and significant others know how they could be contacted in Louisiana. The transfers are part of the state’s plan to reduce overcrowding at the prison under orders from U.S. Judge Myron Thompson.


vicki
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-14-2003, 06:10 PM
vlcoffman vlcoffman is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Theodore, Ala
Posts: 279
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Women inmates transferred from Alabama to Louisiana


By BOB JOHNSON
The Associated Press
4/14/03 7:05 PM


MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) -- Seventy women inmates were transferred late Sunday night from overcrowded Tutwiler Prison for women in Wetumpka to a private penitentiary in Louisiana.

Prison officials plan to eventually send a total of 290 female inmates and 600 male prisoners to private facilities, according to legal papers filed Monday in Montgomery County Circuit Court.

Prison Commissioner Donal Campbell said the women left Tutwiler in a bus at about 10:30 p.m. Sunday and arrived at South Louisiana Correctional Facility in Basile shortly after 6 a.m. Monday. He said the transfer was not announced in advance for security reasons.

Troy King, legal adviser to Alabama Gov. Bob Riley, said the state entered into an emergency contract with LCS to hold the inmates for up to 60 days at a cost of $24 a day per inmate to comply with a federal court order. It costs $27 a day to keep an inmate in prison in Alabama, Campbell said.

King said the process of seeking bids from private prisons was beginning Monday.

Lisa Kung, an attorney for women inmates who filed a lawsuit over conditions at the prison, said she was "furious" that the prisoners were transferred without notice.

"They jumped to this irresponsibly and without aggressively pursuing other options," said Kung, who works for the Southern Center for Human Rights.

Campbell said state officials hope the transfer of the inmates to Louisiana will be temporary.

"We're taking every step we can take to bring them back to Alabama," Campbell said.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson ruled last year that Tutwiler, with more than 1,000 inmates, is dangerously overcrowded and understaffed. State officials have promised Thompson that the population at Tutwiler would be reduced to 750 by June 30. Kung said she would express her reservations about the transfers during a hearing before Thompson scheduled for 10 a.m. Thursday in federal court in Montgomery.

Campbell said the women transferred were in good physical and mental condition, were not considered high security risks and were not scheduled for immediate release.

Kung said many of the women transferred would have been good candidates for work release.

"It's ludicrous they are being sent off to Louisiana instead," Kung said.

Patrick LeBlanc, president of LCS, said the transfer went smoothly and the women will be kept separately from inmates from other states. There are about 650 prisoners at the Louisiana facility, which he said was built to hold about 1,000.

"When they got here they were allowed to call family and friends and let them know how to contact them," LeBlanc said.

Campbell said most of the women were not told they were being moved until Sunday night.

The state is also under a court order from Montgomery County Circuit Judge William Shashy to remove state inmates from county jails. King filed legal briefs in Shashy's court Monday to update him on progress being made in that case.

In those briefs, King told Shashy that the transfer of male and female prisoners to private facilities was part of the plan to make space for inmates currently housed in county jails.

The briefs say that the transfers are necessary because other efforts, such as increasing paroles and community corrections programs "will not have an immediate effect."

The Alabama Legislature earlier this month passed legislation giving the prison system $4.55 million in emergency funding, partly to transfer the women prisoners to Louisiana. Gov. Bob Riley has also committed more than $1 million from an emergency account to speed up paroles of nonviolent prisoners.

Mac McArthur, executive director of the Alabama State Employees Association, said the association opposes out-of-state transfers and is reviewing its legal options.

"It's the state of Alabama admitting we can't provide the essential services of state government," he said at a news conference.

vicki
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-14-2003, 07:04 PM
danielle's Avatar
danielle danielle is offline
The Specialist - Surf but be-ware!
 

Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 9,043
Thanks: 4
Thanked 101 Times in 33 Posts
Default

I merged the two threads together - since they were the same topic...

This is insane!
__________________
Monica Danielle
***********
On September 22, 2003, my better half came home after 657 days in an Alabama prison!!!

And he's now forever free - passing away from this life and into the next - on January 9, 2010.

My Sweet Wayne
January 21, 1954 - January 9, 2010

I'll always love you.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-14-2003, 09:03 PM
deb's Avatar
deb deb is offline
Yooper Mod on Leave
Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 22,802
Thanks: 267
Thanked 811 Times in 248 Posts
Default

Sounds like Michigan a few years ago. We were housing inmates in Virginia as were a few other states.....

Deb
__________________


September 10th 2009
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-15-2003, 04:37 AM
danielle's Avatar
danielle danielle is offline
The Specialist - Surf but be-ware!
 

Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 9,043
Thanks: 4
Thanked 101 Times in 33 Posts
Default

Tutwiler inmates transferred

By Mike Cason
Montgomery Advertiser


Seventy female inmates from Alabama arrived at a Louisiana prison at dawn Monday morning after an all-night bus ride, and 600 male inmates will be following them out of state soon.

The state plans to transfer up to 290 female and 600 male inmates to private out-of-state facilities as part of their plan to relieve overcrowding in prisons and jails; in answer to a federal and a state lawsuit.

The state disclosed plans Monday to transfer male inmates in papers filed with Montgomery County Circuit Judge William Shashy, who has ordered the state to relieve the backlog of inmates in county jails.

Troy King, legal adviser for Gov. Bob Riley, said no facility has been chosen for the male inmates.

King said he did not know of any previous transfers of Alabama inmates to other states.

Department of Corrections Commissioner Donal Campbell said the women transferred from Julia Tutwiler Prison were informed late Sunday afternoon. He said they boarded two buses about 10:15 p.m. Sunday and arrived at the private prison in Basile, La., about 6:30 a.m. Monday. The prison is operated by LCS Corrections Services of Lafayette.

Inmates were not allowed to contact family members until they reached Louisiana, Campbell said. Prior notification would have caused security concerns, he said.

Jay Daniels of Birmingham, whose niece was transferred, said families should have received notice.

"I think it's all wrong," Daniels said. "They're putting hell on their kin people. It's not them they're punishing. They're punishing us."

Daniels said he has tried to help his niece, Vanessa Bass Hall, "settle down" by hiring a lawyer for her and providing other help, but he said it would be much harder with her out of state.

Patrick LeBlanc, owner of LCS Corrections Services, said the facility has about 650 inmates with a capacity of about 1,000. He said the Alabama inmates would be housed separately from other inmates.

"It went off very, very well," LeBlanc said. "The girls seemed to be very much at ease. Not in the beginning, because there was a lot of concern about moving to a new place. Our facilities are new and have air conditioning, color television, microwave ovens and an abundance of programs they can participate in."

But Campbell said the inmates would be better off in Alabama and said he considered the transfers a temporary solution to overcrowding.

"I made a commitment to work as hard as I can to get the inmates back here," Campbell said. "This does not lessen my responsibility. In fact, it increases it."

Campbell said he was at the prison Sunday when the inmates were informed of the transfers.

"We had mixed reactions. Some were ready to go and some weren't," Campbell said.

Inmates who were generally free of chronic health problems, mental health problems and who were not near the end of their sentences were chosen, Campbell said.

Riley signed a contract with LCS Corrections Services to keep the inmates for up to one year at a rate of $24 a day per inmate. That is about $3 a day cheaper than the average cost of housing a prisoner at a state facility in Alabama, Campbell said.

King said the contract was awarded on an emergency basis and that other companies will be invited to bid for future state contracts on inmate transfers.

In December, U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson ruled that conditions at Julia Tutwiler Prison violated the U.S. Constitution's ban on cruel and unusual punishment because of overcrowding and understaffing. He issued the ruling in a lawsuit filed by inmates. He ordered the state to submit a plan to correct it.

The state informed the judge in February that it would reduce the prison's population from about 1,000 to 750 inmates by the end of June, in part by sending inmates out of state. Attorneys for the inmates asked Thompson to block the transfers, but he has not.

A hearing in the case is set for 10 a.m. Thursday in Thompson's court. Attorneys for the inmates will ask Thompson to reinstate a preliminary injunction in the case, which has expired.

Besides the transfers, the state has accelerated paroles and plans to expand community corrections programs in efforts to reduce overcrowding in both male and female prisons and in county jails.

The Legislature recently approved a $4.6 million supplemental appropriation to the state prison system to help expand community corrections and paroles. The governor also sent the system $1 million from an emergency fund that was used to hire 28 parole officers.
__________________
Monica Danielle
***********
On September 22, 2003, my better half came home after 657 days in an Alabama prison!!!

And he's now forever free - passing away from this life and into the next - on January 9, 2010.

My Sweet Wayne
January 21, 1954 - January 9, 2010

I'll always love you.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-15-2003, 09:26 AM
vlcoffman vlcoffman is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Theodore, Ala
Posts: 279
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

This just really pisses me off!!!! excuse the language. I did alot of research last night Basile is over a hundred and seventy miles from New Orleans. New Orleans from Mobile is about a two and a half hour drive. So then you add all those other miles and your probably talking about at least a four hour drive from Mobile.

These inmates in Alabama don't have family visits and support as it is now to move them two states over....I'm sure the phones will be so much higher already and just which state will receive those funds. I ran across a suit last night and I found it very interesting maybe some would like to read those. The prison that these woman have been sent to are one of the worst in Louisianna .
I do know this much Campbell has a plan and this is a way to sneak private prisons here in Alabama. ALong with priviate prisons they make it sound like they are better when in fact they are not. Yes they are somewhat cheaper only because the guards are underpaid, the medical is almost nothing, and they don't have to answer to the state. I think everyone should be keeping a watch on this and voice your opinion, make plans to be at the convention next week in montgomery. Campbell and Raily is suppose to be there.


Click here: http://www.law.umn.edu/centers/crimj...lWorkforce.pdf



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF - ... Pine Prairie Correctional Center -- in Basile and Pine ... state prisoners held in the LCS facility. ... in charge of both the South Louisiana Correctional Center and ...
http://www.schr.org/news/docs/complaint02.pdf

vicki
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-15-2003, 06:51 PM
vlcoffman vlcoffman is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Theodore, Ala
Posts: 279
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Inmates moved to Louisiana
With 70 prisoners gone from state, Tutwiler women's prison remains overcrowded

04/15/03

By BILL BARROW
Capital Bureau


MONTGOMERY -- In an effort to ease overcrowded conditions and comply with a federal court order, Alabama officials moved 70 inmates from Wetumpka's Tutwiler Prison for Women to an unaccredited, privately run facility in Louisiana, corrections Commissioner Donal Campbell announced Monday.

The state will pay LCS Corrections Serv ices, a for-profit firm that operates six prisons in Louisiana and Texas, $24 per day for each prisoner -- $3 less than what the state spends -- to house the women at the South Louisiana Corrections Center in Basile, near Lafayette.


Campbell said the move, made via an eight-hour bus ride Sunday night and early Monday morning, was not announced ahead of time for security reasons.

The transfer coincides with a new commitment from the state Board of Pardons and Paroles to increase its docket to 60 cases per day, according to Troy King, Gov. Bob Riley's legal adviser. That's up from what King described as a historically irregular schedule.

Those efforts, which come amid a barrage of state and federal lawsuits concerning conditions in Alabama prisons, should reduce a swelling inmate population, King said.

King also confirmed that the Riley administration began Monday accepting bids from more private prison operators should the state have to transfer additional inmates. The state is paying LCS under an "emergency contract," which is not subject to the state's bid law, for at least 60 days.

Expedited parole hearings and any necessary transfers will continue, King explained, until the system is in compliance with all court mandates.

With the Sunday transfer, Tutwiler now has about 1,000 inmates. It was designed for 545, and Campbell said the current goal is to reduce the population to 750.

According to the Department of Corrections' latest figures, 18 major facilities now house about 20,000 inmates, more than double the designed capacity. That does not include more than 1,500 state prisoners awaiting transfers from county jails into state facilities.

Riley's predecessor, Don Siegelman, considered contracting with private, out-of-state firms, including LCS, but his administration found those alternatives to be too expensive or otherwise impractical.

Prisoners' rights advocates have criticized moving prisoners out of state, claiming private prisons offer poor rehabilitation programs and have ill-trained security. They've also said putting great distances between prisoners and their friends and family is harmful.

Campbell and Patrick LeBlanc, a managing partner of LCS, conceded Monday that prisoners are better rehabilitated when close to home.

LeBlanc said his company would expand its visiting hours -- usually a morning and afternoon session each Saturday and Sunday -- to accommodate visitors to the Alabama prisoners.

"We're trying to make a good situation out of a bad situation," he said in a teleconference with Alabama reporters Monday.

Still, LCS has had trouble housing out-of-state inmates before now. The state of Idaho shipped about 300 prisoners there in the 1990s but pulled them out after a July 1997 riot.

The same year, Idaho officials released an audit of the LCS prison. The inquiry noted inadequate staff training, too much use of pepper spray, a lack of record keeping about when force was used against prisoners, and conditions that didn't meet the accreditation standards of the American Correctional Association.

LeBlanc told the Mobile Register in a 2001 interview that seeking accreditation was too expensive.

He dismissed criticism of private prisons Monday, telling reporters that his Basile facility has 13 self-help programs -- from GED classes to Alcoholics Anonymous -- and jobs within the prison to offer inmates.

The facility has one guard for every 12 to 15 inmates, depending on fluctuations in the population. The ratio at Tutwiler is about one guard for every 11 inmates, according to Corrections Department statistics.

The Alabama inmates will be held separately from other inmates in a minimum security housing unit that LeBlanc compared to military barracks.

Campbell said he had personally toured the Basile facility and compared it favorably to Tutwiler: "I think they're both good. They're both safe."

He credited the difference between Alabama's per-prisoner spending rate -- the lowest among all state governments -- and even-lower LCS rate partly to bureaucratic expenses, such as mandatory paperwork and cumbersome purchasing procedures.

Campbell said the 70 women were notified of the transfer early Sunday evening. He described "mixed reaction" among the group, though he said there was no "extreme reaction" from any of the transferees.

Lisa Kung, an attorney for women inmates who filed a lawsuit over conditions at the prison, said she was "furious" that the prisoners were transferred without notice.

"They jumped to this irresponsibly and without aggressively pursuing other options," said Kung, who works for the Southern Center for Human Rights.

The inmates selected represented a cross-section of crimes, Campbell said, but all of them had had no history of security problems in the prison and have no record of mental or physical health problems. He said inmates close to their release dates were not considered for transfer.

Campbell said there were mothers among the transfer group. Marital and parental status was not a consideration in choosing which inmates to move, he said.

(The Associated Press con tributed to this report.)

vicki
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-15-2003, 06:53 PM
vlcoffman vlcoffman is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Theodore, Ala
Posts: 279
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Campbell said he had personally toured the Basile facility and compared it favorably to Tutwiler: "I think they're both good. They're both safe."


I hope everyone took note of what campbell said in this article.

vicki
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Question about Interstate Compact - how does it work? Kari_Ann New Jersey General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat 8 02-05-2005 05:05 PM
Missouri's Parallel Universe Ken Missouri Prison & Jail Visitation, Phones, Packages & Mail 9 04-21-2004 10:57 PM
TDCJ SLANG BillysAngel Texas General Prison Talk 12 04-19-2003 11:46 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:36 AM.
Copyright © 2001- 2019 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics