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  #1  
Old 09-26-2010, 07:46 PM
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Default New law changes criminal sentencing

I'm still trying to find out what I heard about 40 something percent...anyone know about that? I did find this.


New law changes criminal sentencing
BY YVONNE WENGER
The Post and Courier
Thursday, June 3, 2010



COLUMBIA -- South Carolina has a new way of dealing with criminals that judges, victims' advocates, crime and justice experts and Republicans and Democrats all have signed off on.

The comprehensive new law is intended to save money while diverting nonviolent offenders from prison to community-based programs so space is available in prison for violent criminals. Gov. Mark Sanford signed it into law Wednesday.

The new law was one year in the making. It is intended to:

--Make sure there is space for high-risk, violent offenders in prison while saving the state an estimated $350 million, the cost of building a new prison.

--Help inmates transition from prison life back to society and increase supervision of former inmates in the community.

--Provide incentives for probationers and parolees to stay drug- and crime-free in order to go from being tax burdens to taxpayers.

The lengthy new law also redefines 22 crimes as violent, providing longer sentences for some offenders. The new sentences would apply to people who commit crimes beginning on Wednesday.

It would not alter the sentences of people already serving time or those awaiting a trial, although it will allow for the early release of geriatric, terminally ill and physically disabled inmates.

Other parts of the new law will become effective over time. For example, the new standards for future probation and parole assessments will begin in January.

Lily Lenderman of Spartanburg said she has fought for some of the changes contained in the new law for seven years, after her 27-year-old grandsonwas killed in an accident involving a habitual offender.

The offender was sentenced to seven months, served four months and was arrested again for another crime 18 days after he was released from prison, Lenderman said.

"From a grandmother's heart, I couldn't understand that," she said. "My cause was to get justice for my grandson and to bring something good from his death, and through this I feel like my journey has been worth it."

The new law also increases maximum penalties for several crimes, such as harboring a fugitive.

It restructures sentences such as requiring a mandatory 30-year sentence for death caused by arson, creating a crime of attempted murder to help charge people appropriately, increasing the amount of victim restitution, and updating fines for theft for the first time in 20 years so values are more in line with present-day costs.

Other odds and ends in the bill include removing the disparity in sentencing between possession of crack cocaine and powder cocaine, establishing an oversight committee to follow the process of the bill's implementation and measure progress, and allowing people on probation and parole to earn good-time credit.

Overtime savings in the Department of Corrections will be shifted to the probation and parole system, which is currently overwhelmed with large and increasing case loads.

Sanford said the law was "smart on crime," a sentiment echoed by many Wednesday. The governor said it strikes the right balance and it's good for the taxpayers. Experts from the Public Safety Performance Project of the Pew Center on the States helped the state develop the new law.

The prison population 25 years ago stood at about 9,000 inmates and is today at 24,000. As the population grew, so did the cost of running the Corrections Department.

In the mid-1980s the prisons ran on $63 million a year. Today it costs $394 million, Sanford said. In another five years the cost is projected to increase by another $141 million, as the prison population grows by another 3,200 inmates.

"For the taxpayers, there is something fundamentally wrong with that system," Sanford said. "Unless we're going to build a bunch more jails, you have got to look at alternatives. This bill does that. I think it strikes the right balance and in the process saves the taxpayers over 400 million bucks."

South Carolina already spends less than $40 per day on each inmate, the second-lowest rate in the nation, Sanford said.

Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, called the legislation a massive undertaking. He was part of the group that spent the last year coming up with solutions to South Carolina's haphazard criminal justice system.

"We really made a difference with this bill," Campsen said. "It is going to change people's lives. It will help offenders get back on their feet and make sure victims get compensated."
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  #2  
Old 01-02-2011, 08:22 PM
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yes i am new to this site also and was wondering about this new bill passed,will it help the inmates that just got incarcerated in sept 2010,and only got 3yrs which is only 18months after the good time and all taken off? i have looked everywhere about this ,and also heard the gonna make parole easier this year,please let me no if you know if this is true for people sentenced after june 2 when it was passed please,thanks


New law changes criminal sentencing
BY YVONNE WENGER
The Post and Courier
Thursday, June 3, 2010



COLUMBIA -- South Carolina has a new way of dealing with criminals that judges, victims' advocates, crime and justice experts and Republicans and Democrats all have signed off on.

The comprehensive new law is intended to save money while diverting nonviolent offenders from prison to community-based programs so space is available in prison for violent criminals. Gov. Mark Sanford signed it into law Wednesday.

The new law was one year in the making. It is intended to:

--Make sure there is space for high-risk, violent offenders in prison while saving the state an estimated $350 million, the cost of building a new prison.

--Help inmates transition from prison life back to society and increase supervision of former inmates in the community.

--Provide incentives for probationers and parolees to stay drug- and crime-free in order to go from being tax burdens to taxpayers.

The lengthy new law also redefines 22 crimes as violent, providing longer sentences for some offenders. The new sentences would apply to people who commit crimes beginning on Wednesday.

It would not alter the sentences of people already serving time or those awaiting a trial, although it will allow for the early release of geriatric, terminally ill and physically disabled inmates.

Other parts of the new law will become effective over time. For example, the new standards for future probation and parole assessments will begin in January.

Lily Lenderman of Spartanburg said she has fought for some of the changes contained in the new law for seven years, after her 27-year-old grandsonwas killed in an accident involving a habitual offender.

The offender was sentenced to seven months, served four months and was arrested again for another crime 18 days after he was released from prison, Lenderman said.

"From a grandmother's heart, I couldn't understand that," she said. "My cause was to get justice for my grandson and to bring something good from his death, and through this I feel like my journey has been worth it."

The new law also increases maximum penalties for several crimes, such as harboring a fugitive.

It restructures sentences such as requiring a mandatory 30-year sentence for death caused by arson, creating a crime of attempted murder to help charge people appropriately, increasing the amount of victim restitution, and updating fines for theft for the first time in 20 years so values are more in line with present-day costs.

Other odds and ends in the bill include removing the disparity in sentencing between possession of crack cocaine and powder cocaine, establishing an oversight committee to follow the process of the bill's implementation and measure progress, and allowing people on probation and parole to earn good-time credit.

Overtime savings in the Department of Corrections will be shifted to the probation and parole system, which is currently overwhelmed with large and increasing case loads.

Sanford said the law was "smart on crime," a sentiment echoed by many Wednesday. The governor said it strikes the right balance and it's good for the taxpayers. Experts from the Public Safety Performance Project of the Pew Center on the States helped the state develop the new law.

The prison population 25 years ago stood at about 9,000 inmates and is today at 24,000. As the population grew, so did the cost of running the Corrections Department.

In the mid-1980s the prisons ran on $63 million a year. Today it costs $394 million, Sanford said. In another five years the cost is projected to increase by another $141 million, as the prison population grows by another 3,200 inmates.

"For the taxpayers, there is something fundamentally wrong with that system," Sanford said. "Unless we're going to build a bunch more jails, you have got to look at alternatives. This bill does that. I think it strikes the right balance and in the process saves the taxpayers over 400 million bucks."

South Carolina already spends less than $40 per day on each inmate, the second-lowest rate in the nation, Sanford said.

Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, called the legislation a massive undertaking. He was part of the group that spent the last year coming up with solutions to South Carolina's haphazard criminal justice system.

"We really made a difference with this bill," Campsen said. "It is going to change people's lives. It will help offenders get back on their feet and make sure victims get compensated."[/quote]
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  #3  
Old 01-22-2011, 04:28 PM
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Has anyone heard anything about violent offenders being able to receive some "goodtime" under this new law? I'm hoping and praying that this will be approved... They need to look at the violent offenders behavior,and if it's clear since the beginning of the incarceration, they should be allowed some goodtime, according to work credits earned... how many agree with me?
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Old 02-01-2011, 01:10 AM
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Default Please Help with any new information about the Early Release

Hello Everyone! I havent been on here in awhile. Hope everyone and their families and loved ones are doing well. I have a question about The SC bill # 725, Early Release Bill, for nonviolent offenders. Before the end of the year, I had seen a few articles and heard a few things about the possibility of early release and/or 6 months taken off the max out times for nonviolent offenders. This was suppose to happen, possibly as early as Jan. 1, 2011. I know nothing is definite and we hear alot of rumors sometimes. Does anyone have any new information about this early release bill ? Or new information as far as if is new SC Governor signing this bill? or if early release is a possibility for nonviloent offenders?
My Husband is a first time , nonviloent offender, at Kirkland He is there on a Breach of Trust charge . He has been in since 2008 and has done well and hasnt had any disicipline issues nor has he gotten into any trouble. So I was so hoping that the information about Early Release I had been hearing before the new year may be true. If anyone can offer me any new information or tell me where I can find any new information, I would be so very grateful. With only seven months to go until he comes home, I want everyone to know how much comfort and help the people on this site have been to me. We all have a common bond and the best thing you find here is a sense of belonging in knowing that you are not alone.
MUCH LOVE AND MANY THANKS!! If anyone has any help or information about this Early Release thing please drop me a line. Thank you all. My best to all of you..... God Bless!! Blessings to all...
Love, Magnolia 17
Feb. 1, 2011
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