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Federal General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat Topics & Discussions relating to the Federal Prison & the Criminal Justice System that do not fit into any other Federal sub-forum category. Please feel free to also introduce yourself to other members in the state and talk about whatever topics come to mind that may not have anything to do with prison.

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Old 10-30-2017, 06:26 PM
worldwide worldwide is offline
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Default My Journey

After three years of waiting, negotiations, etc.I was sentenced last week. I received probation.. I plead guilty to a white collar crime about six months ago. The amount of fraud I was charged with was close to $400,000.

Initially the Govt. wanted to charge me with a number closer to a million dollars but through careful negotiations and some reasoning we reduced the number.

I understand many people have gotten tougher than normal AUSA's. Or have been treated unfairly by the agents, Judges, people in govt, pre trial probation officers etc. I mean no disrespect but, everyone who had anything to do with my case was extremely fair. I received some breaks and a great PSI report from Probation. I had an understanding aJudge who actually took the time to look into my case, read my letters of support, and came to the conclusion I am an overall good guy who made a very bad mistake. Of course my Journey is not over. I am on probation for a few years but, I wanted to take time out to thank this board as so much knowledge about the Federal system can be gained by reading posts. For anyone who has a sentencing hearing coming up and has incredible anxiety like I had I wanted to share a few tips.
Make every effort to educate yourself and prepare all along the way. Learn how the system works. Get quality letters of support. Letters that will make you stand out or show that you have done some sort of charitable work or exceptional act. Have unbiased people speak on your behalf if possible. Prepare an articulate speech to the Judge. When dealing with Probation who writes your PSI make sure to present yourself well. Sir/Maam, please/thank you and so on....If you are dealing with a difficult or an "out to get you" AUSA or Probation officer go out of your way and make it hard from them to hate you or be vengeful. Be so nice and respectful they are forced even through their hard exterior to like you. Anyway, I just wanted to give back a little and encourage those who may be feeling down or stressed there is hope.
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:03 PM
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I'm sorry but this post feels very naive. Did you have private counsel? Are you a person of color? Are you poor with no one who can help you financially? Are you college educated? Did you grow up poor? Did you grow up with only one or less parents? If you had parents, did either have a drug or drink issue? Did you witness abuse, death, drug dealing, etc as a way of life as a child?

This post really peeves me, sorry. You appear to be coming from a place of privilege whereas most of our LO's have not.


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Originally Posted by worldwide View Post
After three years of waiting, negotiations, etc.I was sentenced last week. I received probation.. I plead guilty to a white collar crime about six months ago. The amount of fraud I was charged with was close to $400,000.

Initially the Govt. wanted to charge me with a number closer to a million dollars but through careful negotiations and some reasoning we reduced the number.

I understand many people have gotten tougher than normal AUSA's. Or have been treated unfairly by the agents, Judges, people in govt, pre trial probation officers etc. I mean no disrespect but, everyone who had anything to do with my case was extremely fair. I received some breaks and a great PSI report from Probation. I had an understanding aJudge who actually took the time to look into my case, read my letters of support, and came to the conclusion I am an overall good guy who made a very bad mistake. Of course my Journey is not over. I am on probation for a few years but, I wanted to take time out to thank this board as so much knowledge about the Federal system can be gained by reading posts. For anyone who has a sentencing hearing coming up and has incredible anxiety like I had I wanted to share a few tips.
Make every effort to educate yourself and prepare all along the way. Learn how the system works. Get quality letters of support. Letters that will make you stand out or show that you have done some sort of charitable work or exceptional act. Have unbiased people speak on your behalf if possible. Prepare an articulate speech to the Judge. When dealing with Probation who writes your PSI make sure to present yourself well. Sir/Maam, please/thank you and so on....If you are dealing with a difficult or an "out to get you" AUSA or Probation officer go out of your way and make it hard from them to hate you or be vengeful. Be so nice and respectful they are forced even through their hard exterior to like you. Anyway, I just wanted to give back a little and encourage those who may be feeling down or stressed there is hope.
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Old 10-30-2017, 09:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InLuvWithALifer View Post
I'm sorry but this post feels very naive. Did you have private counsel? Are you a person of color? Are you poor with no one who can help you financially? Are you college educated? Did you grow up poor? Did you grow up with only one or less parents? If you had parents, did either have a drug or drink issue? Did you witness abuse, death, drug dealing, etc as a way of life as a child?

This post really peeves me, sorry. You appear to be coming from a place of privilege whereas most of our LO's have not.
I was afraid/aware that someone here may read my post and feel the way you did. When composing the post I tried not to make it sound as If I was writing it from a privileged position or bragging. (which I wasnt)

However, and without getting into a war of words, I will address some of your questions. Yes to many of the questions you have above and, I can tell you that whether someone is privileged or not, Is poor or rich, Is a person of color or not makes no difference in what I said. Does one need to be a certain color or from a certain economic background to be polite, respectful, and knowledgeable about their case? Answering yes or no to any of your questions makes no difference. I can also tell you that I spoke with many people with money and from a position of so called privilege and they were treated far more harshly by the system.
I simply posted this to thank Prison talk, to share the experience I had over the last three years and, to offer some advice if someone else in the future may be looking for some. I am aware every case is different and every situation is different. This is just mine.

Last edited by worldwide; 10-30-2017 at 09:06 PM..
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Old 10-30-2017, 09:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InLuvWithALifer View Post
I'm sorry but this post feels very naive. Did you have private counsel? Are you a person of color? Are you poor with no one who can help you financially? Are you college educated? Did you grow up poor? Did you grow up with only one or less parents? If you had parents, did either have a drug or drink issue? Did you witness abuse, death, drug dealing, etc as a way of life as a child?

This post really peeves me, sorry. You appear to be coming from a place of privilege whereas most of our LO's have not.
The poster's experience is his experience. You can't ask that everyone have the same ones....and none of us do. This was the OP's, and it's a perfectly valid one for him/her.

Let it be.
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Old 10-30-2017, 10:11 PM
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What was your offense level?

@InLuv. I totally get where you're coming from and it's obvious to anyone reading that he had private counsel and one can deduce his background. However that does not take away the validity of his story. And I do I agree with him that being polite goes a very far way.

Good luck on probation OP. Don't fuck it up and make them reconsider why they gave you a second chance. If you violate, you will end up in prison for sure. Best of luck to you. It's easy once you're in it to start thinking "well I haven't seen my PO in a long while and I only see them in person every few months." Don't fall prey to that kind of negative thinking. Keep looking forward.
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Old 10-30-2017, 10:28 PM
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Level 15

Guidelines 18-24 months.

Appreciate the advice and, I will not fall into that trap.

Last edited by worldwide; 10-30-2017 at 11:09 PM..
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Old 10-31-2017, 04:43 AM
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Congratulations on receiving a great sentence, something I would have appreciated too. Now your job number one is to make it through supervised release without any problems.
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Old 10-31-2017, 05:49 AM
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Congratulations on being in the 20% who got a downward variance. And thanks for sharing. You are eligible to get off supervision after one year, but if you owe $ it could take longer. There are a wide variety of experiences here and all are welcome.
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Old 11-01-2017, 11:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InLuvWithALifer View Post
I'm sorry but this post feels very naive. Did you have private counsel? Are you a person of color? Are you poor with no one who can help you financially? Are you college educated? Did you grow up poor? Did you grow up with only one or less parents? If you had parents, did either have a drug or drink issue? Did you witness abuse, death, drug dealing, etc as a way of life as a child?

This post really peeves me, sorry. You appear to be coming from a place of privilege whereas most of our LO's have not.
I get your point but realistically white color criminals, from any background, are less likely to get harsh sentences than drug or violent offenders. My sons father came home in 2 w/ 3 years probation for mortgage fraud/identity theft totaling $175k. He is black, from a poor home, uneducated, and didnt have private counsel. My finance on the other hand got 14 years for a nonviolent role in a Rico/drug conspiracy case. Its fucked up. But it isn't the OP fault.
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Old 11-01-2017, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InLuvWithALifer View Post
I'm sorry but this post feels very naive. Did you have private counsel? Are you a person of color? Are you poor with no one who can help you financially? Are you college educated? Did you grow up poor? Did you grow up with only one or less parents? If you had parents, did either have a drug or drink issue? Did you witness abuse, death, drug dealing, etc as a way of life as a child?

This post really peeves me, sorry. You appear to be coming from a place of privilege whereas most of our LO's have not.
WTF is your problem??? No one should be asked any of what you did, maybe you need to spit out that bitter pill you seem to have swallowed!! I thought he or she had some great advice for others. I don't care what your socio-economic back ground is, there is no basis for your assumptions and your judgment. Some of us respect others for just sharing their experiences so it may help someone else.
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Old 11-02-2017, 10:54 AM
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I get your point but realistically white color criminals, from any background, are less likely to get harsh sentences than drug or violent offenders. My sons father came home in 2 w/ 3 years probation for mortgage fraud/identity theft totaling $175k. He is black, from a poor home, uneducated, and didnt have private counsel. My finance on the other hand got 14 years for a nonviolent role in a Rico/drug conspiracy case. Its fucked up. But it isn't the OP fault.
Thanks and, I agree.
Interestingly my Judge had a reputation for being tougher on White Collar crime and felt the guidelines for white collar were too low.
He was generally easier on Drug related offenses because he felt the majority of drug offenders did it out of desperation and the guidelines were way too high.
I got lucky and feel fortunate and grateful.
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Old 11-05-2017, 07:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by worldwide View Post
After three years of waiting, negotiations, etc.I was sentenced last week. I received probation.. I plead guilty to a white collar crime about six months ago. The amount of fraud I was charged with was close to $400,000.

Initially the Govt. wanted to charge me with a number closer to a million dollars but through careful negotiations and some reasoning we reduced the number.

I understand many people have gotten tougher than normal AUSA's. Or have been treated unfairly by the agents, Judges, people in govt, pre trial probation officers etc. I mean no disrespect but, everyone who had anything to do with my case was extremely fair. I received some breaks and a great PSI report from Probation. I had an understanding aJudge who actually took the time to look into my case, read my letters of support, and came to the conclusion I am an overall good guy who made a very bad mistake. Of course my Journey is not over. I am on probation for a few years but, I wanted to take time out to thank this board as so much knowledge about the Federal system can be gained by reading posts. For anyone who has a sentencing hearing coming up and has incredible anxiety like I had I wanted to share a few tips.
Make every effort to educate yourself and prepare all along the way. Learn how the system works. Get quality letters of support. Letters that will make you stand out or show that you have done some sort of charitable work or exceptional act. Have unbiased people speak on your behalf if possible. Prepare an articulate speech to the Judge. When dealing with Probation who writes your PSI make sure to present yourself well. Sir/Maam, please/thank you and so on....If you are dealing with a difficult or an "out to get you" AUSA or Probation officer go out of your way and make it hard from them to hate you or be vengeful. Be so nice and respectful they are forced even through their hard exterior to like you. Anyway, I just wanted to give back a little and encourage those who may be feeling down or stressed there is hope.
I cannot agree with this philosophy or experience more. I know you consider your sentence of probation to be a gift and will most likely not abuse that at all.

My husband was indicted just over 3 years ago, also for a white collar crime. There were many delays, some due to his attorney, but many due to the AUSA and probation officer and some even on the 80+ year old judge that we were always worried about would drop dead during the case. Once my husband decided to take a plea, (unfortunately he was not eligible for probation) I pushed him to change lawyers to one that specializes in sentencing. Boy was it a 180 from the first lawyer, completely different advice especially regarding restitution and character letters. Not that we had money to hide, but we certainly were not rushing to pay any restitution originally. The second lawyer said beg and/or get loans from anywhere we can to pay restitution because it will make the biggest difference. First lawyer said 3-5 character letters, second lawyer said more, but also said quality letters matter more than who the letters are from. In other words, don't ask someone to write a letter if they really didn't know my husband and would just "put in a good word for him". Judge wants to hear from the heart (as I posted recently in another thread).

My husband did everything his attorney suggested, and everything this post mentions, we educated ourselves on the entire process, researched and learned all about PSRs and how they work, updated all of his medical records, got letters from his Dr's related to his medical issues, my husband had always been someone who volunteered and he started to do it even more, it doesn't cost anything to help someone else, he had been and continued to see a therapist (you can also do this for free), he got a loan to pay his restitution, sent out many emails and letters requesting character letters because he really didn't know who would respond. You don't have to start reforming yourself after you go to prison, you can start now, you can take free classes, you can go to counseling, you can go to rehab, Better yourself before sentencing so a judge can see you're doing all of these things.

When my husband was indicted the guidelines if he went to trial were 10-12 years. I can't remember what they would have been at the time if he had taken a plea (I think 6-8 yrs)because the only good thing about there being a delay is that there was a small adjustment of the guidelines in 2015 before he took his plea (Sept 2016). After his plea the guidelines for him were 57-71 months. The AUSA asked for him to be sentenced within the guidelines and we believe the probation officer did as well. She refused to tell his attorney her recommendation and blew him off through the process when he wanted to speak with her. He got the impression that she was jealous (who knows of what?) and petty and very by the book. The first lawyer told my husband to expect 3-4 years and the current one said he hoped for 2-1/2 but emphasized that my husband did everything that he could to put himself in the best possible position.

My husband is deeply in debt, has fully repaid his restitution, but his sentencing was not a cakewalk. There were unexpected "vitcims" there, even though they weren't victims as laid out in the plea by the AUSA. The AUSA also suddenly wanted my husband to pay much more restitution than he had, even though he paid the number the AUSA had give us a year ago. The Judge obviously didn't buy this because not only was my husband not given any additional restitution, he wasn't even given a fine, which we had been told to expect of at least $10,000 but could've been in the millions (gag!)!

End of story, the judge wanted none of that. Also realized that while my husband made a mistake, that he also took his share of accountability without issue, but also realized and made mention that there were others at fault too and when he asked the AUSA if they were being prosecuted this shmuck lied right to the Judges face with an "I don't know!". I couldn't believe it because he did know that they were not going after these crooks. My husband unfortunately, was stupid, probably was a pansy, but did make a bad decision and owned up to it. The AUSA knew that, and everyone knows these others are scumbags, but they will get their just due as karma will hit them.

Regardless, the judge wasn't an idiot and like you say, do everything right and it makes a difference. We were shocked, thrilled and also given a gift as he was only sentenced to 18 months (clearly not the 3 years we were expecting or prepared for).

The point is, listen to your attorney and do right by yourself while you can instead of after. Do your research and ask a lot of questions!! That is what we are trying to do now on this site. Ask questions, so that we know what to expect and so there are no surprises. Obviously not everything can be planned out but people can always better themselves and their circumstances and you don't need to be rich to do these things (in reference to the inappropriate post someone else made in response to the OP).

Good luck in your future endeavors!

Last edited by rockchalk1; 11-05-2017 at 07:23 AM..
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Old 11-05-2017, 08:53 AM
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In my experience there are way more brutal federal judges than lenient ones. The sentencing guidelines were supposed to cure some overzealous sentences, but the Supreme Court took away the benefits when they ruled the guidelines (once mandatory) became merely advisory.

These judges are well known by both prosecutors and defense lawyers. I believe that my judge would have given his mother a maximum sentence too, but since she gave birth to him, she would probably deserve it.
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Old 11-06-2017, 01:19 PM
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I cannot agree with this philosophy or experience more. I know you consider your sentence of probation to be a gift and will most likely not abuse that at all.

My husband was indicted just over 3 years ago, also for a white collar crime. There were many delays, some due to his attorney, but many due to the AUSA and probation officer and some even on the 80+ year old judge that we were always worried about would drop dead during the case. Once my husband decided to take a plea, (unfortunately he was not eligible for probation) I pushed him to change lawyers to one that specializes in sentencing. Boy was it a 180 from the first lawyer, completely different advice especially regarding restitution and character letters. Not that we had money to hide, but we certainly were not rushing to pay any restitution originally. The second lawyer said beg and/or get loans from anywhere we can to pay restitution because it will make the biggest difference. First lawyer said 3-5 character letters, second lawyer said more, but also said quality letters matter more than who the letters are from. In other words, don't ask someone to write a letter if they really didn't know my husband and would just "put in a good word for him". Judge wants to hear from the heart (as I posted recently in another thread).

My husband did everything his attorney suggested, and everything this post mentions, we educated ourselves on the entire process, researched and learned all about PSRs and how they work, updated all of his medical records, got letters from his Dr's related to his medical issues, my husband had always been someone who volunteered and he started to do it even more, it doesn't cost anything to help someone else, he had been and continued to see a therapist (you can also do this for free), he got a loan to pay his restitution, sent out many emails and letters requesting character letters because he really didn't know who would respond. You don't have to start reforming yourself after you go to prison, you can start now, you can take free classes, you can go to counseling, you can go to rehab, Better yourself before sentencing so a judge can see you're doing all of these things.

When my husband was indicted the guidelines if he went to trial were 10-12 years. I can't remember what they would have been at the time if he had taken a plea (I think 6-8 yrs)because the only good thing about there being a delay is that there was a small adjustment of the guidelines in 2015 before he took his plea (Sept 2016). After his plea the guidelines for him were 57-71 months. The AUSA asked for him to be sentenced within the guidelines and we believe the probation officer did as well. She refused to tell his attorney her recommendation and blew him off through the process when he wanted to speak with her. He got the impression that she was jealous (who knows of what?) and petty and very by the book. The first lawyer told my husband to expect 3-4 years and the current one said he hoped for 2-1/2 but emphasized that my husband did everything that he could to put himself in the best possible position.

My husband is deeply in debt, has fully repaid his restitution, but his sentencing was not a cakewalk. There were unexpected "vitcims" there, even though they weren't victims as laid out in the plea by the AUSA. The AUSA also suddenly wanted my husband to pay much more restitution than he had, even though he paid the number the AUSA had give us a year ago. The Judge obviously didn't buy this because not only was my husband not given any additional restitution, he wasn't even given a fine, which we had been told to expect of at least $10,000 but could've been in the millions (gag!)!

End of story, the judge wanted none of that. Also realized that while my husband made a mistake, that he also took his share of accountability without issue, but also realized and made mention that there were others at fault too and when he asked the AUSA if they were being prosecuted this shmuck lied right to the Judges face with an "I don't know!". I couldn't believe it because he did know that they were not going after these crooks. My husband unfortunately, was stupid, probably was a pansy, but did make a bad decision and owned up to it. The AUSA knew that, and everyone knows these others are scumbags, but they will get their just due as karma will hit them.

Regardless, the judge wasn't an idiot and like you say, do everything right and it makes a difference. We were shocked, thrilled and also given a gift as he was only sentenced to 18 months (clearly not the 3 years we were expecting or prepared for).

The point is, listen to your attorney and do right by yourself while you can instead of after. Do your research and ask a lot of questions!! That is what we are trying to do now on this site. Ask questions, so that we know what to expect and so there are no surprises. Obviously not everything can be planned out but people can always better themselves and their circumstances and you don't need to be rich to do these things (in reference to the inappropriate post someone else made in response to the OP).

Good luck in your future endeavors!
Thank you, Although no one knows for sure what will happen at sentencing. If one does what you said above by preparing as much as possible, trying to make restitution and, showing the Judge you are doing the right thing. I think Judges will try to reward you. Not only for the obvious reason but, also to encourage others to do the same.
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Old 11-09-2017, 05:52 PM
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I have not posted here in quite a long time. But the things I learned here played a large part in my outcome...

Its not too often one hears of the fair treatment the OP eluded to. Way back I actually looked for that here.

Its weird, but I too experienced this. Back during my process I actually thanked the US Marshals when they were fingerprinting me and taking my pictures!! imagine...They were joking with me and keeping it light.

I appreciate the OP's insight and sharing it. That's what this Forum is all about. To put spin and qualifications on someones experience and good intent to help others, is not right.

I can also say that I'm not of Priviledge at all, Went into major debt to have an ok lawyer, and didn't have anyone to rely on other than myself.

I could tell from the beginning the situation was serious. I got serious by learning all I could, so I could speak intelligently for myself and make the most of my encounters with the government along the way.

The OP got a departure. I got one as well with probation. A lot of luck plays into it, Agreed. But I made it a huge point to be warm, honest, polite, presentable and articulate. Everyone from the Marshals, Pre-Trial Services, Probation, and later, the FLU was fair with me and at least treated me with respect.

Who knows really, it can be a crap shoot any given day. But certainly don't hinder yourself. That sort of stuff you can do for free. Take the OP's advice. Heck, it cant hurt right?

Last edited by mer191; 11-09-2017 at 06:03 PM..
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Old 11-09-2017, 06:20 PM
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I have not posted here in quite a long time. But the things I learned here played a large part in my outcome...

Its not too often one hears of the fair treatment the OP eluded to. Way back I actually looked for that here.

Its weird, but I too experienced this. Back during my process I actually thanked the US Marshals when they were fingerprinting me and taking my pictures!! imagine...They were joking with me and keeping it light.

I appreciate the OP's insight and sharing it. That's what this Forum is all about. To put spin and qualifications on someones experience and good intent to help others, is not right.

I can also say that I'm not of Priviledge at all, Went into major debt to have an ok lawyer, and didn't have anyone to rely on other than myself.

I could tell from the beginning the situation was serious. I got serious by learning all I could, so I could speak intelligently for myself and make the most of my encounters with the government along the way.

The OP got a departure. I got one as well with probation. A lot of luck plays into it, Agreed. But I made it a huge point to be warm, honest, polite, presentable and articulate. Everyone from the Marshals, Pre-Trial Services, Probation, and later, the FLU was fair with me and at least treated me with respect.

Who knows really, it can be a crap shoot any given day. But certainly don't hinder yourself. That sort of stuff you can do for free. Take the OP's advice. Heck, it cant hurt right?
It is definiteley worth taking advice from someone who has successfully done what they are saying!!!
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Old 11-09-2017, 07:11 PM
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It is definiteley worth taking advice from someone who has successfully done what they are saying!!!
Exactly. You certainly aren't going to be punished for being nice to someone. It usually goes a long way and sometimes it is better to bite your tongue and suck it up!

As my grandmother used to tell me when she was alive "kill them with kindness". It really does work!
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Old 11-09-2017, 10:16 PM
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Thanks for the positive feedback
I'll add one more piece of advice that I learned. Try and make your self stand out. In a good way. Show the AUSA, Probation and the Judge that, you deserve a break. Be it doing charity or volunteer work in the community during the months/years you are waiting for sentencing. Work hard or sell your assets to pay restitution. Any good deeds you have done in the past, find someone to speak on your behalf and tell the Judge what you did. If your not working, find a job, so you can show the Judge you haven't been just sitting around waiting to be sentenced. In the toughest of times for many of us try and muster a positive attitude. It will show and the Judge/PO/Agents ect will pick up on it and, see you are not the same person you were when you committed the offense.
My Judge was a senior judge and I am sure to him many cases are monotonous. Many Defendants and cases look the same. Try and do something exceptional to set yourself apart. This works in White Collar or any other case.
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Old 11-23-2017, 11:03 PM
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Please get over the privilege stuff here. The original poster is sharing his experience and his experience gives hope that others may find the same outcome in their cases as well.
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Old 12-04-2017, 04:37 PM
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Jeez I can't believe you got probation for stealing a million dollars and you only have to pay back 400k.

Sooooo, minus legal fees, which I'm guessing were about 150k, you probably got away with 450k plus all the money they don't know about.

Nice work.
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Old 12-04-2017, 04:45 PM
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I think you misunderstand. The government always over-estimates the financial gain, usually by several times over, because they connect everything they can glom on to the total. Any irregularities in the company's books, and estimates they can make, those get added in, too.
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Old 12-04-2017, 05:50 PM
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The IRS will take the exaggerated "loss" figures as gospel, so expect a battle if you try to pay income taxes on the actual amount of money you took rather than the inflated figures in the indictment.
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Old 12-04-2017, 08:02 PM
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Jeez I can't believe you got probation for stealing a million dollars and you only have to pay back 400k.

Sooooo, minus legal fees, which I'm guessing were about 150k, you probably got away with 450k plus all the money they don't know about.

Nice work.
Not sure how to take your comment. Pardon me if I am interpreting it wrong but, if seems you are either congratulating me for my crime and/or saying my endeavour was a profitable one. Or possibly you are being sarcastic. Again I don't really know.
First off the Govt initially inflated the numbers and were talking about it being a million dollar fraud. However, we proved to them it wasn't. So I didn't actually gain a million dollars. It was closer to $400K. Regardless of the amount be it a million or $400k I would never want to go through this process again and, I wouldn't wish this on anyone. This was three years of horrible anxiety and stress and, probably took years off my life. Again, I am grateful for the ultimate outcome but, believe me it was no bonanza.
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Old 12-06-2017, 12:29 PM
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Not sure how to take your comment. Pardon me if I am interpreting it wrong but, if seems you are either congratulating me for my crime and/or saying my endeavour was a profitable one. Or possibly you are being sarcastic. Again I don't really know.
First off the Govt initially inflated the numbers and were talking about it being a million dollar fraud. However, we proved to them it wasn't. So I didn't actually gain a million dollars. It was closer to $400K. Regardless of the amount be it a million or $400k I would never want to go through this process again and, I wouldn't wish this on anyone. This was three years of horrible anxiety and stress and, probably took years off my life. Again, I am grateful for the ultimate outcome but, believe me it was no bonanza.
You said you negotiated the amount down to $400k so I misinterpreted that to mean it was a deal.

I'm quite aware of the stressful process. I served 5 years in prison for stealing $30k and I won't be able to pay that back anytime soon, no matter how much I scrape, save and borrow. In addition, I have 5 years of probation.

But you're absolutely right about having good manners, and I'm so sure your slap on the wrist had nothing to do with your socio-economic status. I know it was a really hard slap and really really painful to someone of privilege.

I'm totally regretting my bad attitude.
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Old 12-06-2017, 08:58 PM
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You said you negotiated the amount down to $400k so I misinterpreted that to mean it was a deal.

I'm quite aware of the stressful process. I served 5 years in prison for stealing $30k and I won't be able to pay that back anytime soon, no matter how much I scrape, save and borrow. In addition, I have 5 years of probation.

But you're absolutely right about having good manners, and I'm so sure your slap on the wrist had nothing to do with your socio-economic status. I know it was a really hard slap and really really painful to someone of privilege.

I'm totally regretting my bad attitude.
Im not comparing my situation, stress or pain to anyone who has had to serve time. I have mentioned multiple times how grateful, fortunate and lucky I am.
I am only relaying my experience, personal thoughts, and some advice.
However,
You make me laugh and, that is really hard for " Someone of privilege" as you called me, to do. I am also totally regretting my socio-economic status. Hopefully one day I can change that.

Last edited by worldwide; 12-06-2017 at 09:16 PM..
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