Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > U.S. REGIONAL FORUMS > FEDERAL PRISON SYSTEM > Federal Prison Self Surrendering Information
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Federal Prison Self Surrendering Information Information about Federal Prisons and Self-Surrendering to the BOP.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-15-2018, 02:28 PM
cglive22 cglive22 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: California
Posts: 17
Thanks: 47
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default It's Official, heading to Lompoc camp June 29th: What is surrendering like?

Today I found out my designation and will be self surrendering to Lompoc Federal Prison Camp in 2 week, June 29th. I have done a lot of research but it offically seems more real than it has before. The main information about the prison I have found useful but can anybody give me more insight about the prison camp itself? I read the thread on PTO but it incorporates the Medium and Low facilities and is hard to separate.

Also, what is surrendering like? My wife and kids will be taking me there but Can anybody give me more insight how the process works? What I should expect? And any tips?

Feeling real sad today. I only have 30 months but I have a family I don't want to be away from and know i will miss out on so much.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-15-2018, 03:27 PM
rockchalk1 rockchalk1 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Chicago
Posts: 971
Thanks: 18
Thanked 1,130 Times in 568 Posts
Default

I don't know what Lompoc is like, but when I dropped my husband off it was surreal. He is at a free standing camp, not connected to any LOW ofr other facility, so nothing scary looking about it at all. I pulled up and hit some buzzer and a dinky parking gate when up and they told me where to drive and pull up. It was in front of a small building. A bunch of guys walking around in green clothes we could see. Took us a bit to realize they were inmates because they were just walking around freely alone or in pairs, but all dressed in these heavy winter coats (this was December in upper Minnesota). It looked like a small college campus. We just waited in front of this admin building and then a CO came out, my husband got out of the car and the guy had my husband give him the stuff he wanted to bring in and he quickly perused it, it was empty medicine bottles, vitamin bottles, his cash, had him empty his pockets, etc. Pretty harmless. A big ziploc of stuff that he told my husband what he could bring in and couldn't, what he couldn't he had my husband put back in the car for me and he let us say a quick goodbye and that was it. I then pulled away and drove the 4 mins (couldn't believe it was only 4 mins lol) to the airport.

The scariest part was not hearing from him for 2 days because that's how long it took before the email and phone was set up. The key was finding a spouse on here who's husband was at the same place, and only because of that, did I find out that night he was ok because she had her husband seek out my husband. Another white collar guy so that was a huge help, and then my husband the next day was able to email me through that guy via his wife, also helped. My first visit which wasn't until almost 6 weeks there was a ton to talk about because he was put with some crazy roommates, drug addicts, contraband sellers, you name it, it was like he was being tested. Get out of a bad room if you find yourself in one because they will give you a shot if anyone in your room is caught with that crap. Fortunately, my husband is now with white collar dudes only and no drama.

It'll be hard for your wife esp at first, the sense of loss and loneliness. Not sure how old your kids are. I was previously divorced with 4 kids, so I knew what to expect in terms of being alone and how to be busy. That is the key. It helps if she finds some things of her own to do to keep herself occupied, and she needs to reach out to friends to make herself busy, as a single, they often just don't think of you. It's not because of you being in prison. She will just be an afterthought, not part of a couple. Tell her not to take it personally.

Remember, 30 months is NOT 30 months. And after you're there about 4 weeks, if your wife keeps checking the inmate locator, it will give your good time release date, which is way less than 30 months, and you will get a letter which will also give your date of eligibility for home confinement or hwh, which is even earlier than the date on the inmate locator.

One other bit of advice..there is a lot of drama in the camps, even between men. A lot of pettiness as well, when you have visits, when someone gets released, etc. Try not to get caught up in it, be happy for others, don't get too excited when you have a visit, etc. But most importantly, there is so much gossip that people talk about re the prison reform stuff. Everyone gets ahead of themselves. The latest my husband has told me is that everyone thinks Trump will be pardoning them. I literally LOL at that. But, many of these guys with long term sentences, only have that to hope for, so it is what it is. But a lot of guys will be talking about the First Step Act etc and it is easy to get caught up in it too. Don't drive yourself or your wife crazy about it. Be hopeful, but don't count on it, and when/if something changes, then take it as a pleasant surprise. She can sign up for email updates for the bill which is helpful. I seem to be the information spouse for my husband and his little friends so I'm constantly the one stuck looking up everything.

Feel free to pm me if you'd like with any questions, or as I think I've offered before, your wife is more than welcome as well.

Otherwise, good luck and hang in there.

Oh one other thing which really goes a long way..pre-arrange for your wife to have flowers or something sent to her for her birthday, mother's day, valentine's day, your anniversay and just because. Trust me, it will go a long way!!
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to rockchalk1 For This Useful Post:
cglive22 (06-15-2018), fbopnomore (06-15-2018), Minor activist (06-15-2018), Nickel Timer (06-15-2018), Willstickbyher (07-01-2018)
  #3  
Old 06-15-2018, 05:11 PM
fbopnomore fbopnomore is offline
Site Moderator

PTO Site Moderator Staff Superstar Winner 

Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 27,125
Thanks: 41,553
Thanked 20,132 Times in 11,754 Posts
Default

Do not believe anything you hear or read from the inmate grapevine until it actually happens. Stories about imminent early releases have been around forever. There was also an official looking memorandum circulating about all of the wonderful programs available to newly released prisoners. If any of it were true, release would result in an instant retirement, with plenty of money, but it was just clever BS.

You will earn 107 days of good time at 47 days off for each 12 months of your 30 month sentence. If the pending bill in Congress passes and becomes law, 47 days will increase to 54, but that will only add another 2 1/2 weeks of good time.

The existing law allows the bop to send everyone to 12 months in a half way house, or 6 months in home confinement for the last portion of their prison sentence, but they don't. His unit team case manager will decide how much, if any, "community corrections" time they will allow him. He will still be in bop custody, just not living in a prison.

Self surrendering to a minimum security camp is the best possible situation for any federal prisoner. Many campers are not willing to chance catching conduct violations, which often result in a quick transfer to a real prison. But some guys don't care about anything, so stay away from anyone who exhibits risky behavior.
__________________
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to fbopnomore For This Useful Post:
David (06-15-2018)
  #4  
Old 06-15-2018, 05:58 PM
rockchalk1 rockchalk1 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Chicago
Posts: 971
Thanks: 18
Thanked 1,130 Times in 568 Posts
Default

fbopnomore said it correctly, do not listen to the bs you will hear inside about the stuff going on, although this is the first time there is actually some real progress as there is an actual bill that has passed the house and in the senate AND has bi-partisan support. The problem is that the Senators do not feel it goes far enough. Of course, you have to start small and what they don't realize is that some prison reform is better than none. There are things in there that lower the age of the "elderly" from 65 to 60, so that a lot of low risk felons will get out immediately. Some other things as well.

I think the law now is that you can only go to a HWH/HC for up to 10% of your sentence. So in your case, the max you will be able to go is 3 months. It's better than nothing and if you're a low risk, white collar, chances are you will be going. Where my husband is, the white collar have not been held up and have been getting released on the dates as expected. It's the other felons that have had their dates pushed back due to the cuts in HWH.

Your unit case manager makes the recommendation for HC or HWH, but the warden is who ultimately approves it. The other thing is that everything there moves as slow as molasses. My husband met with this case manager fairly quick after he SS in December and was told he would see his unit manager again this month (June). He got a call out in March instead and the guy said he was ahead on paper work so he was recommending my husband at that time directly to HC and he would know something in 1-2 months. Well, now it's June (3 months later) and he hasn't heard anything. But, he is on for a call out again next week (probably the original 6 month call out) so hopefully he'll hear something. We have also already had our pre-release home visit, which was a non-event. The guy came to our house, looked into each bedroom, checked out our basement, wanted to see all the bathrooms, etc. and told me the process of supervised release and said I'll see him when my husband is on HC to go over SR stuff and then after that he'll probably never see us again as my husband will probably just have to send him monthly reports, then put in to be released off SR after 6 months. I'm hoping because that'll be nice. Hoping this is one of the efficient dudes in the system, because NOTHING else is efficient. Typical bureaucracy.

A camp is best scenario for sure, but there are plenty of rule breakers there. You need to observe and after a couple weeks you will find your group and know who are the good ones and who are not. Some will genuinely help you, others will not be useful. People will be stealing all the time, lying, say they're innocent, smoking, doing drugs, have contraband, trying to sell you anything, etc. Just stay away, keep your head down, do your time, and get the hell out of there. There is also a lot of gambling. The only thing my husband has seen are guys that get beat up in the camp because they don't pay their gambling debts.

There are some things that you will find beyond stupid. You just have to go with the flow and suck it up. You'll be shaking your head wondering about those things, but it is what it is.

Also, try to find a job as soon as you can. My husband was willing to take any job (other than facilities because he's useless there) so he worked in the kitchen, then figured out who the right people were to move up and out into education and now is a tutor/teacher in the GED program and loving it. Took him about 2-3 months to fully learn the system and ropes. Has had no real issue other than a bag with his writing materials and a book he checked out from the local public library being stolen. If my husband, who is very naive and somewhat of a primadonna can do it, trust me, anyone can!
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to rockchalk1 For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (06-15-2018), Minor activist (06-15-2018)
  #5  
Old 06-15-2018, 09:32 PM
fbopnomore fbopnomore is offline
Site Moderator

PTO Site Moderator Staff Superstar Winner 

Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 27,125
Thanks: 41,553
Thanked 20,132 Times in 11,754 Posts
Default

Here's what Families Against Mandatory Minimums, FAMM, says about the Second Chance Act which became law in 2005. Everyone is eligible for up to 12 months in a HWH, but the bop gets to decide the actual amount.
http://www.doc.ri.gov/documents/reen...ance%20Act.pdf

Does the Second Chance Act help people only when they get out of prison?

With few exceptions, yes. The bill is designed to provide programs that help people leaving prison reenter their communities, so that they do not reoffend. Only three parts of the bill may be able to affect how long a person stays in prison.

These three parts only affect people in federal prison.

The first lengthens the outer limits of the time an individual is guaranteed consideration for prerelease community corrections (halfway house) from six months to 12 months. However, there is no new requirement that the BOP give every person the full 12 months in a halfway house at the end of their sentence.

The BOP may place a prisoner in home confinement for the shorter of 10 percent of the term of imprisonment or six months.

The second creates a limited pilot program called the Elderly and Family Reunification for Certain Nonviolent Offenders provision. This provision will likely only take place in one facility and is unlikely to provide relief for many individuals.

Finally, the bill increases slightly the percentage of a federal sentence that can be served in home
confinement. There is no requirement that the BOP give prisoners any time in home confinement.
__________________

Last edited by fbopnomore; 06-15-2018 at 09:44 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-15-2018, 10:01 PM
David's Avatar
David David is offline
Fed-X is Back!

Staff Superstar Award 

Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Texas, USA
Posts: 20,837
Thanks: 3,302
Thanked 7,761 Times in 1,586 Posts
Default

Most likely, the hardest thing you are going to do is walk through 'the gates' into "R&D"...

I know that sounds trite considering your point of view at the moment, but I've been there.. I self-surrendered to a Medium, and everything leading up to even that was the worst part of it. Sure, there were instances that were uncomfortable, but the mental hell I went through before I hit the yard was the worst part. Of course, those results will always vary..

I wish I could share more with you re: surrendering to a camp.. And, I never had a wife and children to worry about when I was inside. Some with longer time will say 30 months isn't anything; however, it is all relative. While you're inside keep your eyes on the exit and do whatever you can to better yourself, and your family if you are able, even if it's only mentally = stay strong for them.
__________________
"Too often ... people enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought" - Leapfrog
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to David For This Useful Post:
cglive22 (06-15-2018), fbopnomore (06-16-2018), Kajun48 (06-17-2018), MsFish (07-01-2018)
  #7  
Old 07-01-2018, 12:08 PM
MsFish MsFish is offline
Supportive Mom
 

Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18
Thanks: 101
Thanked 21 Times in 11 Posts
Default

Thank you for all of the above posts. We are in Oregon and will soon be driving my son to Terminal Island, CA, for self-surrender. It's been difficult to know what to expect, for both of our experiences, and know it is different for everyone.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MsFish For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (07-01-2018), Sarianna (07-02-2018)
  #8  
Old 07-19-2018, 10:42 PM
Patty58 Patty58 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California
Posts: 32
Thanks: 42
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
Default Lompoc Self Surrender

My son self surrendered last week for a probation violation to Lompoc.The questions I have is when he self surrendered he spent 6 days in the SHU, why is that if he is at a camp. The second question is when he surrendered they gave him the prison issued clothing. I asked him if they were shipping his clothes back to me. He said he heard from others there that the clothes/shoes he walked in with get donated to goodwill, any truth to that. Its pretty low of the BOP if they do.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-19-2018, 11:17 PM
rockchalk1 rockchalk1 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Chicago
Posts: 971
Thanks: 18
Thanked 1,130 Times in 568 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patty58 View Post
My son self surrendered last week for a probation violation to Lompoc.The questions I have is when he self surrendered he spent 6 days in the SHU, why is that if he is at a camp. The second question is when he surrendered they gave him the prison issued clothing. I asked him if they were shipping his clothes back to me. He said he heard from others there that the clothes/shoes he walked in with get donated to goodwill, any truth to that. It’s pretty low of the BOP if they do.
My husband went to a camp in December and they shipped his clothes back to me. I got them about 2 weeks later. My understanding is that they ask if you want the clothes shipped back or not. He was expecting to leave them there to be donated, so he wore crappy stuff, but then he wound up taking his jacket in because it was so cold the day he went and he wanted that coat back, so they sent everything out.

They have segregated housing units at camps. Normally they are used when an inmate commits a "violation" of some sort, if there is no room in a regular dorm room, or if it turns out there is another inmate that they find out is not supposed to be at the same facility as that person. In your son's case, perhaps because he had a parole violation, that is why he was sent to the SHU right away. The SHU at a camp, while crappy, is certainly nothing compared to a SHU at a higher level facility. At my husband's place, it is not solitary confinement. There are multiple guys in the same dorm room in the SHU.

Last edited by rockchalk1; 07-19-2018 at 11:19 PM..
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to rockchalk1 For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (07-20-2018), Patty58 (07-20-2018)
  #10  
Old 07-19-2018, 11:29 PM
Minor activist Minor activist is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: WA USA
Posts: 1,632
Thanks: 1,034
Thanked 1,454 Times in 797 Posts
Default

There are camps that don't even have their own SHU but instead contract with the local county jail.
__________________
I'm collecting Best of PTO posts and quotes in my blog here.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Minor activist For This Useful Post:
Patty58 (07-20-2018)
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
lompoc camp, self surrender

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Self-Surrendering to Lompoc Prison Camp soon... Questions, please help! pearlandtruth Headed to Prison 5 01-14-2015 11:30 AM
Surrendering to Lompoc Camp Thx1012 Headed to Prison 1 04-13-2012 10:24 PM
LOMPOC ON THE 29th FederalProp1987 Federal Prison Self Surrendering Information 2 08-03-2011 02:03 AM
It's official...reporting to Lompoc satelite camp.. motoman Federal General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat 1 11-30-2005 02:47 PM
Okay Everyone.......Its official..I will be Mrs. Marc on April 29th!!! marcsbaby Prison & Jail Wedding Information Central 37 04-24-2005 08:59 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:02 AM.
Copyright © 2001- 2017 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics