Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > AROUND THE WORLD > Canadian Prison & Criminal Justice Topics > Canada Parole, Probation & Legal Information
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-16-2017, 12:08 PM
mrs.k042314 mrs.k042314 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: California
Posts: 9
Thanks: 2
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default Need info about parole process in Alberta

Hello all,

My husband is currently serving a 3-year sentence in a low security facility in California but has been approved for a transfer back to Canada. His was a drug offense, no prior record and has had many great things going for him in regards to getting a very light sentence (he was initially facing a minimum of 10 yrs), family support, a job waiting for him, etc.

According to paperwork he received from Corrections Canada, he is eligible for full parole on March 9, 2017, which is 1/3 of his sentence. Has anyone been through the parole process recently and can provide some info on how long it takes for one to actually get a hearing and then granted parole after the eligibility date? Is it a few days, weeks or months? And, say he gets granted full parole, does he walk out same day and get to come home? Or do they take another few days to let him out and require him to stay elsewhere like a halfway house?

We are clueless on this whole thing and there really isn't much info online on the little details. Wish they were better about that because it's stressful for families! We just want our loved ones home and to be able to prepare for it!

Thanks so much!
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-16-2017, 04:40 PM
onparoleinTO onparoleinTO is offline
OnparoleinTO
 

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 594
Thanks: 551
Thanked 664 Times in 327 Posts
Default

Hi Mrs K
I'm currently on parole in Toronto, having just completed day parole; I was released about 5 months ago. Here are some intro comments; you can message me for more details.
Normally he would get a parole hearing about the time of his full parole eligibility, in March. However it takes 4-5 months usually to schedule a hearing once all the paperwork is done, and it's possible that won't be done until he gets back to Canada. His parole officer at the institution will make a recommendation on whether he should be paroled and if so with what conditions, but the Board does not have to follow this recommendation.
At the hearing he will face 2 members of the parole board who will ask questions (and generally try to make him feel bad). You and other family members can attend that hearing if you wish. He can also have a lawyer or other assistant at the hearing if he wishes. They will ask him about his crime, look for remorse, etc.
The board can grant him either full parole, in which case he goes directly home, or day parole, in which case he has to live at a halfway house for, typically, 6 months. The board can also set conditions that he then has to observe while on parole. If he gets full parole he's released the next day usually; if day parole he has to wait for a space in a halfway house, which can take several weeks, and sometimes even longer.
That's the story in brief; feel free to ask if you want to know more, either here or with a private message.
Do you know what institution he'll be sent to in Canada?
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to onparoleinTO For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (01-22-2017), IKARUS1984 (01-26-2017), mrs.k042314 (01-22-2017)
  #3  
Old 01-22-2017, 10:10 AM
mrs.k042314 mrs.k042314 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: California
Posts: 9
Thanks: 2
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Hi there,

Thanks so much for your response! There's just not a lot of information out there for families who have never been through this before, so this forum has been a life-saver! I'll keep the conversation going here, in case there is anyone else in the same situation and also looking for answers. My husband is from Alberta, so he will likely be sent to Bowden or Drumheller. He is currently in a low-security facility here, but I'm really uneasy about what type of place he will end up in once he arrives in Canada. I hope they take into account where he was here in the US and house him in a place with a similar security rating. He is a first-time offender and has a lot of positives going for him that I think will help in getting full parole.

How likely do you think it happens where a hearing is scheduled within weeks after arriving to Canada? I'm glad to hear they release people immediately after granting full parole, as opposed to taking another few months to do whatever paperwork is necessary for that. The reason I ask this is because I am planning to relocate to Canada immediately after his release. Thankfully, we had applied and was approved for my Canadian permanent residence before his arrest. Otherwise, that'd be another big problem for us.

Does the parole board also ask questions directed towards the family members, or do they only take into consideration the answers of the inmate? What type of conditions do they impose on parolees?

Also, as someone who is currently on parole, have you found it difficult to reintegrate back into the workforce because of your record? My husband had a great job prior to his arrest (his charge stems from years ago and the US govt decided to arrest him suddenly when he traveled to Vegas for a conference--this was already after he'd been traveling to the US with me and for business for a couple years) and we are concerned he will have a hard time getting work after he is released.

Also, how was your experience with your parole officer? I have read some threads where people have said parole officers will discourage inmates from requesting parole hearings, or even intentionally hold paperwork up.

Thanks again, so much, for your insight! You've already been so helpful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by onparoleinTO View Post
Hi Mrs K
I'm currently on parole in Toronto, having just completed day parole; I was released about 5 months ago. Here are some intro comments; you can message me for more details.
Normally he would get a parole hearing about the time of his full parole eligibility, in March. However it takes 4-5 months usually to schedule a hearing once all the paperwork is done, and it's possible that won't be done until he gets back to Canada. His parole officer at the institution will make a recommendation on whether he should be paroled and if so with what conditions, but the Board does not have to follow this recommendation.
At the hearing he will face 2 members of the parole board who will ask questions (and generally try to make him feel bad). You and other family members can attend that hearing if you wish. He can also have a lawyer or other assistant at the hearing if he wishes. They will ask him about his crime, look for remorse, etc.
The board can grant him either full parole, in which case he goes directly home, or day parole, in which case he has to live at a halfway house for, typically, 6 months. The board can also set conditions that he then has to observe while on parole. If he gets full parole he's released the next day usually; if day parole he has to wait for a space in a halfway house, which can take several weeks, and sometimes even longer.
That's the story in brief; feel free to ask if you want to know more, either here or with a private message.
Do you know what institution he'll be sent to in Canada?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-27-2017, 01:50 PM
onparoleinTO onparoleinTO is offline
OnparoleinTO
 

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 594
Thanks: 551
Thanked 664 Times in 327 Posts
Default

Sorry for slow responses - I've not been on the site for a few days. Glad my comments are helpful - that's why I'm on this site so don't hesitate to ask.
I really don't know what they do with transfers from the US; I didn't meet anyone in that situation. Worst case they will send him to an assessment unit for 2-3 months to figure out a placement. I don't know where the assessment unit is in Alberta, but if he ends up in assessment can explain to you how all that works.
Again, I'm afraid I don't know how soon he would have a parole hearing once he gets hear, but my guess would be it would take a few months, because the paperwork for a parole hearing normally takes 4-5 months to create. I would think it very unlikely (but I could be wrong) that it would happen faster than that. One thing about the system here, they are never in a hurry to do something that prisoners want....
The parole hearing: The two (usually) parole board members ask questions only to the prisoner. However he has the right to have an 'assistant' with him - which can be a friend, family member, or lawyer, and that person can speak, though cannot answer questions for the prisoner. (I had a lawyer as my assistant; my wife was at the hearing as an observer. The lawyer did make some useful comments. But most prisoners did not use a lawyer; I did because of features peculiar to my situation.)
Conditions - they can impose any conditions they want, such as a curfew, or not having any drugs or alcohol, or getting treatment of some kind, or going to school, etc. There are some standard conditions for everyone on parole, including having to report to police once a month, having to report any change of address, and staying within a certain geographical area (in my case, City of Toronto, so I have to get permission in advance from my parole officer even to go to the airport to pick up or drop off family members).
Parole officers - the community parole officers, who supervise you when you're released, seem generally to be pretty good - reasonable and helpful. That's quite different from the POs in the jails, who can be a real problem. What you've heard about delays, etc is absolutely consistent with my experience. But my PO here in Toronto is very easy to work with; no complaint there at all. I see here only about once a month now, though it was more at the start.
Work - this is definitely a big problem for many guys. Having a criminal record is a huge barrier to many kinds of work. I'm retired and don't have to work, luckily, so that's one worry I haven't had to deal with, but I've been in several support groups where it has definitely been an issue. A lot depends on what kind of work he did and what kind of crime he committed - and you may not want to talk about that in this forum. the guys who've had the most success are those who can be self-employed/run their own business, or who are in certain technical fields where their crimes aren't likely to be a factor. If you committed fraud, you won't get a job with a bank... but if you're, say, an IT person who committed a drug offense, your chances are better. As with jobs generally, much depends on your network, your skills, etc.
Again, hope this helps and feel free to ask again.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-15-2017, 09:45 PM
Boardchick10 Boardchick10 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Alberta Canada
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Hi there
My fiancee is in Bowden. He is eligible for day parole in August and full parole in October. Generally inmates will not go into full parole from what I understand. They will more than likely go into day parole which is a half way house. And then after a certain amount of time they will go for full parole. My fiancee P.O. has mentioned to him he was to have a hearing in September which is after his day parole eligibility..but he actually going to be assigned a new p.o. which means he's going to talk to them about having the hearing in July . Everything in prison is a slow process...dont expect his hearing to be schedule within days. Highly doubt that will happen . Since he is coming from the states they will probably put him into intake first. .meaning he will be observed and watched for 90 days. Your visits will be behind glass and he will be assigned an intake p.o.. after his intake is over they will decide where they want to transfer him..meaning he may be transferred to a different prison or a different unit or even the minimum security part of the prison. Everyone goes into gen pop (medium security) when they get there..miniumum is a recommendation by a p.o. not everyone gets there..but in your husband's case sounds like he'd be a candidate. Once he gets to Alberta send your visiting application in asap and make sure he memorizes your phone number so he can request to get you on his calling card asap. That coupd be a 2 -4 week process on its own..once he gets here they will probably allow one 5 min phone call to you and after that you may wait a bit to hear from him again until your approved..everything always takes so long ugghh. But make sure he talks about parole to his p.o. right away and get him to apply right away ..will make things speedier for you..
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-16-2017, 08:36 PM
onparoleinTO onparoleinTO is offline
OnparoleinTO
 

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 594
Thanks: 551
Thanked 664 Times in 327 Posts
Default

Further to Boardchick - Until recently, hardly anyone was getting full parole (vs day parole) but that is starting to change, I understand. If you are on day parole you are in a halfway house for 6 months or until your community parole officer is willing to recommend full parole - which can be earlier or later. Many parole officers in the prisons are still in the old mode of delay everything, but in fact they cannot stop you from applying in relation to your eligibility dates, whatever they say. So the earlier advice is right on - get going on a parole application as soon as he can. It's actually worth reading the CCRA (the legislation that governs the prison and parole systems, available in prison libraries) so that you understand what is or isn't legal, because you can't always believe what the staff tell you, in my experience.

It typically takes 4 months from application to get a day parole hearing; your full parole hearing should happen automatically right around the eligibility date unless the prisoner has agreed to waive or defer - which many do on advice of their PO without understanding what it means.

I don't know if they send trasnferees to assessment first; if he already has a security level in the US they might just use that - but I really don't know. In Canada bout 20% of federal prisoners are in minimum, about 20% in max and about 60% in medium, but it also matters which particular prison you are in, as they seem to have (from what I've heard) quite distinct personalities. If you have 3 years or less there's a much higher chance of being in minimum, which is generally much superior in terms of doing your time.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-16-2017, 08:53 PM
Boardchick10 Boardchick10 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Alberta Canada
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

So much great info here!! Just on the different federal prisons in Alberta. Bowden, drumheller, and Edmonton. Edmonton is a maximum security prison and is the only one like that in Alberta. Bowden and drumheller are the same. They are classified as medium security but do a have a minimum component to them. They call the minimum the annex. Minimum is given to inmates on certain criteria and are basically put on a lost once their p.o. have recommended them to go. It's basically a matter of when they have room available. I had a family member as well serve in Bowden..he spent his intake (90 days) in gen pop and then moved to the annex. Same with my finacee. He's been approved and is now just waiting. Bybthe time he's moved it will probably be a total of a month or so for him to get there..again everything is slow. With the info from the other fellow commenting here and our own personal experiences and my other family members experience this is how it's kinda played out for us so far..good luck to you and your man !!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-25-2017, 12:30 PM
mrs.k042314 mrs.k042314 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: California
Posts: 9
Thanks: 2
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Sorry for the late response--I just saw the last two responses on here from May 16th. It's been a while since I last posted and my husband's transfer has actually progressed a lot since January. He began the transfer in late February and was moved from Taft CI in California to Nevada Southern Detention Center in Pahrump, NV. He was there a few weeks, then was moved to SeaTac in Seattle, WA. A few more weeks there, then he was on to Abbotsford, BC where he stayed for over a month as he underwent the initial assessment and intake to determine what facility he'd be sent to in the Prairies (because his family lives in Edmonton, AB). It seems the Canadian system is ANCIENT compared to the US system. He had email while he was at Taft and was able to call any number (landline or cell) as their phone systems worked on kind of like a calling card system, where you're able to load money on to his phone account and that's where the money would be deducted per minute for his phone calls. When he got to Abbotsford, he wasn't able to call because they were only able to call collect on landlines. Seriously, who the hell still has a home phone number?!? So, we were only able to speak one time in the month and a half that he was at Abbotsford, which was when they granted him one 5-minute phone call to let me know he was there (prisons in Canada won't confirm that an inmate is there, even if you're next of kin, so if they can't call you cause you have a cell, you won't even know where they are).

After his assessment at Abbotsford they determined they'd send him to Bowden, which is where he's been for the last couple of weeks. Same phone situation there. I've since moved to Edmonton from California, so I made it a point to have a home phone number so I can talk to my husband. It takes about a week for them to approve your phone number, so I'm still waiting to talk to him. He underwent another intake as soon as he got to Bowden, this time with his intake parole officer. From what I understand, they were trying to determine his security level and his final pen placement. It took about 2 weeks, and a few days ago my husband was able to call his best friend's office landline and let us know that he will be transferring to Grierson Center in downtown Edmonton, which is a minimum security facility that has a capacity of about 30. When he got to Bowden he applied for parole right away, since his full parole eligibility date was March 9 and throughout that whole time he was in transit, so Bowden was his first chance to get anything moving from there.

We don't know what will come out of his stay at Grierson Centre or how long he will be there, but my hope is that he gets some kind of day parole from there, and then full parole after. He says that he's been told Grierson is "easy to parole out of" because it's minimum and to be transferred there, one has to prove they have had a good behavioral record and are not at risk of reoffending.

Any more news on your fiancee, Boardchick10? OnparoleinTO, how long did it take for you to get a parole hearing after application?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-25-2017, 06:04 PM
onparoleinTO onparoleinTO is offline
OnparoleinTO
 

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 594
Thanks: 551
Thanked 664 Times in 327 Posts
Default

Hey Mrs K - that sounds great! The phone call problem was probably because he was moved to a provincial jail; they only have a collect call system and yes, it's a real problem for anyone without a landline. Federal prisons in Canada work on phone cards and approved numbers, and I believe Bowden is federal, so I don't know why he didn't get a card soon after getting there. It's normal that you would almost immediately after getting to an assessment unit. On the other hand, it took me 6 weeks to get approval to call anyone on my card... so perhaps that's what has been going on with him. That should improve once he gets out of assessment. (I

It's great that he's in minimum; definitely makes life easier. I don't know anything about Grierson It's a bit weird to have a minimum security in a city - but he'll let you know how it works.

Parole - Normally a prisoner would have a parole hearing automatically, without application, around their full parole eligibility date - which clearly didn't happen with him. A hearing usually happens about 4 months after an application, but it could be quicker for him because he's past his full parole eligibility date. Not sure how this works for an international transfer. Then it could take several more weeks after a hearing if he's waiting for a space in a halfway house, depending on how clogged the system is in Edmonton. I waited nearly 4 weeks from hearing to actual release.

Hope that helps.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-11-2017, 08:14 PM
Edmonton00 Edmonton00 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 16
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Hi everyone, I have a question. My fiancé is serving an 8 year (7 with time served pre trial) in Bowden (transferred from Drum recently). He has ETAS and we have PFVs. He's been in for 2.5 years and his full parole is August.. next month. He didn't go up for Day parole on his day parole date but he's going for both full and Day on his full parole date. He hasn't gotten into any serious trouble. His po just told him she isn't supporting him for parole. What are his chances now that she isn't supporting? I'm really worried. Feel Free to ask me any questions if needed. She also made errors on his paper work stating that he got sent back to medium from minimum and is now in minimum again which isn't true... he's never been sent back to medium. Any insight is helpful.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-11-2017, 08:58 PM
onparoleinTO onparoleinTO is offline
OnparoleinTO
 

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 594
Thanks: 551
Thanked 664 Times in 327 Posts
Default

Edmonton - I'm combining responses to both your posts. Support of the institutional parole officer is not that important; support from the community parole group is more important. However I do know of cases where parole was generated without either internal or community support. He should definitely try to correct errors in his paperwork; if his PO won't do it, he can and should write directly to the parole board pointing out why the report on him is wrong or misleading. He can also say this at the hearing but it's better to put it in writing ahead of time. If he has written confirmation of job offers, he can also send those in to the Board in advance. Also it may be helpful for him to have an 'assistant' at the hearing - which can be a lawyer or a personal friend - just to help keep him composed and make useful comments to the Board.

Hope that helps and good luck. Ask if you want more... or PM.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to onparoleinTO For This Useful Post:
gvalliant (07-14-2017)
  #12  
Old 07-12-2017, 08:41 PM
Edmonton00 Edmonton00 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 16
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Thank you for your prompt response. I read I think yesterday but wanted to let my fiancé know before responding. It's so nerve wracking. Do you know how often/the next time he can go up for parole should he be denied this time? He's thinking about waiting 3-6 months and applying then but I don't think that will make a difference, I think he should go up now. But I'm also not in there so I don't know what's best or what isn't. Is it true it's about another 1.5 years to go up for parole again?

His stat is 2020. Thank you!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-12-2017, 08:43 PM
Edmonton00 Edmonton00 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 16
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Default

To clarify, I meant is it true it takes another 1.5 years to be able to go up again should he be denied.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-13-2017, 08:10 PM
onparoleinTO onparoleinTO is offline
OnparoleinTO
 

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 594
Thanks: 551
Thanked 664 Times in 327 Posts
Default

If he's denied he normally has to wait a year before reapplying, but the parole board can say otherwise at the hearing - for example they might specify certain conditions to meet after which he can reapply.

I'm inclined to agree with you that waiting 3 months won't help much. The key thing is for him to have a good and well supported plan of where he will live, what he will do for income, and what he will do to stay out of trouble.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to onparoleinTO For This Useful Post:
gvalliant (07-14-2017)
  #15  
Old 07-14-2017, 10:20 AM
Edmonton00 Edmonton00 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 16
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by onparoleinTO View Post
If he's denied he normally has to wait a year before reapplying, but the parole board can say otherwise at the hearing - for example they might specify certain conditions to meet after which he can reapply.

I'm inclined to agree with you that waiting 3 months won't help much. The key thing is for him to have a good and well supported plan of where he will live, what he will do for income, and what he will do to stay out of trouble.

Thanks again! If I knew how to "thank" on here I would do it but I don't see an option. So he pushed it to October, his po said she'll support hi if he continues to be good and that she'll review in October but in October he may need to push it to January based on her support or not. She told him by January he'll have more time in too (almost 3 years) and it will be almost half of his sentence and she may support him then contingent on the fact that he stays out of trouble. Also in October she said if he does well she'll give him work release until January when he'll be going up. Or October, but sounds like January. Let me know your thoughts. I should be PMing you this but I hope it's helpful for others to see as it's hard to get info and I'm so glad you are providing some insight.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 07-15-2017, 11:10 AM
onparoleinTO onparoleinTO is offline
OnparoleinTO
 

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 594
Thanks: 551
Thanked 664 Times in 327 Posts
Default

There is a 'thanks' option that you can tick on any post that you like - a box at the bottom right.
This story about PO support is a familiar one - they seem to want to keep people in jail longer. As I said earlier, her support is not that important, but community support is. He should think about whether there's anything he could say to the community review group that might make them say yes, then he could largely ignore his internal PO. I don't really see why 3 more months would get her support as opposed to now, since he's been in 3 years already. Don't forget that if he applies in Oct, it could take 3-4 more months to actually have a hearing. I assume he was deferred his original full parole eligibility date?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
canada, canadian, corrections canada, parole

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Alberta Prisons ..Need info lost_in_canada Canada Prisons & Jails Visitation, Phones, Packages & mail 5 02-04-2011 11:06 PM
mel+mike Needs Info on Parole Packets and Process Info mel+mike Texas Parole, Probation, Work Release & Community Service 2 05-31-2010 09:06 PM
anyone from alberta ? need info bella79 Prison & Jail Wedding Information Central 3 09-15-2008 07:35 PM
Need Info: about Alberta holdingon2 Georgia Prison and Jail Specific Discussions 2 01-26-2007 05:42 PM
Need info about the parole process... JJH06 Georgia Parole, Probation, Work Release & Community Service 9 10-06-2006 11:59 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:12 PM.
Copyright © 2001- 2017 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics