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Death Row & Capital Punishment Discussions Discussions relating to inmates on Death Row / facing capital punishment in the United States and abroad that don't fit into any of the other forums

View Poll Results: Which do you think is a tougher penalty?
Life in prison 252 56.25%
Death penalty 196 43.75%
Voters: 448. You may not vote on this poll

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  #76  
Old 12-09-2008, 02:41 AM
Beachluver Beachluver is offline
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Originally Posted by crzyrussell View Post
I think that LWOP is far worse than a death sentence. When you are in death row you are the center of attention, web site, penpals, people sending money, etc. But if you are serving LWOP you are forgottem over time. I have read on numerous occasions about how as time goes on lifers loose contacts with family- their parents die, and for the most part people move on. So by the time they are in their later years they have nobody except maybe their cellie, if they have one.

That to me is a punishment far worse than leathal injection.
It's the same way with the victims..People forget as time goes on....Either punishment they aren't walking out alive. LWOP is just prolonging their lives. Living in prison is not living - they are co-existing.

It should be against the law to publish inmates contact info online for any reason.

Last edited by Beachluver; 12-09-2008 at 02:47 AM..
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  #77  
Old 12-09-2008, 04:34 PM
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In the bad old days, some one sentenced to death, sat in his cell that night unable to sleep because of the hammering noises of his gallows being built. Next morning at light it was all over. None of this torture for years and years with it hanging over the condemned heads. Of course thats rough as well, no chance of appeal and there must be a chance of redress, but endless court cases and stays must be almost unbearable. To think that some one would get to the chair then be told, 'not now, may be later at some date, well let you know', is just sick and to me it is torture. With so much talk in the States about 'water boarding' and other forms of illegal torture you'd think that this kind of sanctioned torture would be up for more discussion.
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  #78  
Old 01-07-2009, 05:41 PM
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The death penalty with out a doubt. The conditions in which someone on death row lives are diifferent....which of course differs from state to state. Some death row inmates get no contact visits...some don't even get phone calls...they have no opportunity for employment nor are they given access to an education. They are locked in their 6 by 4.5 foot cell 23 hours out of the day. And of course looms their impending execution. Sometimes that date will come multiple times...only to receive a stay a few minutes before it is supposed to happen....the stress that must create for them and their loved ones is most definately tremendous.

If you ask anyone with a friend, pen pal or loved one on death row they would say that they'd much rather that they have life without parole...I mean if the death penalty wasn't so bad...why even bother appealing ? Why fight for a reduction in your sentence at all?

I guess it boils down to a choice between...living your entire life behind bars until you die of old age....or living a short time and having to face the death chamber...I mean what kind of way to go is that? Imagine being strapped to that chair and being lethally injected...in front of a room full of strangers no less...and maybe even your loved ones...that they must watch the life leave your body....

That's not to say that life without parole is a cake walk...I am sure it is very difficult and has a whole other set of struggles.

Just my opinion
Actually the conditions on death row can be better at least in some ways and it depends on the state too. I remember there was white supremacist guy who demanded he be sent to death row just for the better conditions and he got his wish.

Some GP in state prisons can truly be living hell. Not an ounce of privacy. Of course staying alone in a cell can cause you to lose your mind but some DRs do have common area where inmates can gather.

Even so both are REALLY bad. One will drive you crazy due to the violence, noise, lack of privacy and other will drive you crazy because there's too much privacy. LOL!
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  #79  
Old 01-07-2009, 05:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crzyrussell View Post
I think that LWOP is far worse than a death sentence. When you are in death row you are the center of attention, web site, penpals, people sending money, etc. But if you are serving LWOP you are forgottem over time. I have read on numerous occasions about how as time goes on lifers loose contacts with family- their parents die, and for the most part people move on. So by the time they are in their later years they have nobody except maybe their cellie, if they have one.

That to me is a punishment far worse than leathal injection.
EXCELLENT post. Imagine what it would be like to have your family just go on without you and then you're family members slowly start dying off!! You have no remants from your life in the free world at all anymore! It's amazing that the poll on this is about the same as CNN.

It's true it's the same with DR but at least it comes to end while the torment is for your entire life with LWOP.

To those who keep mentioning god just remember that faith is not enough to show that any claims of god are real. Faith is one thing but REALITY can be something very different. Also remember there are THOUSANDS of gods that people claim to be and they ALL can't be real! LOL! Faith cannot show that ANY of them are anything outside of early man's mythic creations.
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  #80  
Old 01-09-2009, 05:14 AM
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Geez I really dont know to me I think they are both harsh. I mean imagine living on death row wondering when the day is going to come that they will execute you I couldnt imagine that. But on the other hand LWOP is also incredibly harsh as well because you have to live with the fact that you are going to die in prison and like others have said people tend to get forgotten after so many years have gone by so alot of people doing lWOP are doing it alone. I think its one of those things were if you have one you want the other instead meaning im sure there are people on death row who would rather have LWOP and there are people who have LWOP who wish they wouldve gotten the death penalty.
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  #81  
Old 01-09-2009, 02:21 PM
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The problem with this poll is that it does not allow for the question of which offenders would be subject to each--what criteria would be used in determining whether a particular sentence should be imposed? This raises the additional question of what the purpose of imprisonment should be. Is it to remove the offender from society/"protect society", to punish the offender, to attempt to rehabilitate the offender? Or something else entirely?

One possible problem in promoting LWOP is that the end result may be that it is imposed on many other offenders who would otherwise have received a lighter sentence. By way of example, I will cite Alcatraz, which was originally built to "house the worst of the worst", in no small part as a publicity stunt (the prison only held 300 inmates). By the time the place closed, due to crowding in the Federal prison system, men were being sent there who had stolen cars or robbed banks. Not exactly the original purpose of the facility.
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  #82  
Old 01-11-2009, 05:27 PM
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I guess I read it differently. I think it is harder on the convicted murderer to have life in prison rather then the death penalty, which is done and over once it is administered. I am in favor of the death penalty myself. Sometimes a crime is so heinous that it just needs punishment. Personally, I believe that the victim needs to come first and foremost in violent or sex crimes.
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  #83  
Old 01-11-2009, 05:57 PM
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The innocent need to come first. Victims are not always innocent and convicts are not always guilty. People have been executed for acting in defense of their own lives, and others have died for crimes they did not commit.

A man in, I believe, Africa was recently released from prison after it was determined that the man he had been convicted of murdering was still alive and well.
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  #84  
Old 01-14-2009, 03:33 AM
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I think that the worst is to be killed by State laws, I mean DP
Here in Europe the most time to be in prison is 30 years., nobody stays up to death. serial killers and pedophily crimes put the offenders in mental hospitals.
The important point is to know what is the prison for? to punish , or to try to recovery the offender and to put him again in society?
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  #85  
Old 01-15-2009, 04:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crzyrussell View Post
I think that LWOP is far worse than a death sentence. When you are in death row you are the center of attention, web site, penpals, people sending money, etc. But if you are serving LWOP you are forgottem over time. I have read on numerous occasions about how as time goes on lifers loose contacts with family- their parents die, and for the most part people move on. So by the time they are in their later years they have nobody except maybe their cellie, if they have one.

That to me is a punishment far worse than leathal injection.
well, thinking so, we must kill all people that lives on wheell-chairs, blinds, ills without hope... instead they want to live, they are usefull for family and society.
I think life is the most sacred thing in this world. nobody has the right to take it .
living in prison the whole life isn't a good thing, but to be executed is worse
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  #86  
Old 01-15-2009, 02:23 PM
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Don't for a moment believe that any government is above advocating euthanasia as a means of reducing its financial burden. Here in the United States, we can expect to see it begin as soon as Social Security starts to run short of money. In the Netherlands, it already exists, though no one will admit that that is the most likely reason.

Curiously (and on another subject entirely), to my knowledge, those who developed lethal injection for prisoners in this country never considered the combination of drugs used in the Netherlands, which are administered in such as way as to insure that the "patient" does not suffer any pain. No such certainty has ever been established for the "cocktail" used to execute prisoners.
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  #87  
Old 01-15-2009, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by DaveMoff View Post
Don't for a moment believe that any government is above advocating euthanasia as a means of reducing its financial burden. Here in the United States, we can expect to see it begin as soon as Social Security starts to run short of money. In the Netherlands, it already exists, though no one will admit that that is the most likely reason.
Hahaha! C'mon now....You are so fixated on the government "killing" people you have actually convinced yourself they'll be out to kill us all.
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  #88  
Old 01-16-2009, 12:41 AM
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Don't for a moment believe that any government is above advocating euthanasia as a means of reducing its financial burden. Here in the United States, we can expect to see it begin as soon as Social Security starts to run short of money. In the Netherlands, it already exists, though no one will admit that that is the most likely reason.

Curiously (and on another subject entirely), to my knowledge, those who developed lethal injection for prisoners in this country never considered the combination of drugs used in the Netherlands, which are administered in such as way as to insure that the "patient" does not suffer any pain. No such certainty has ever been established for the "cocktail" used to execute prisoners.
In Europe DP doesn't exist. isn't it enough? A state musn't kill its citizents to teach them that to kill is a crime. Did you read which countries have DP? China, Iran, Irak, Thailand... What does USA, the first country of the world, among them? Are you sure Neatherland is the Gomorrah you are thinking? if you talk about money, do you know how expensive is DP?
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  #89  
Old 01-16-2009, 12:51 AM
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I didn't say the Netherlands was Gomorrah, or make any conclusions at all on the subject. I merely stated a set of conditions which exist, nothing more.

Euthanasia has long been practiced covertly in the United States and I presume in virtually every other country. Dying people are often given overdoses of morphine to "insure that they do not suffer"....and in truth, I have no quarrel with that. However, active euthanasia can be a "slippery slope", and the United States has toyed with it on occasion. Until the early 1960s, for example, it was common practice to set Down Syndrome newborns on one side of hospital nurseries and ignore them until they died. My mother was an obstetric nurse and witnessed it many times. And how many of you know someone with Down Syndrome who is over 40? Anyone?

I do think some people have misread my original post and believe I was comparing apples and oranges. I was, more accurately, discussing two separate though related subjects in a single post. Furthermore, I was responding to the post immediately preceding mine. I do apologize for any misunderstanding but do ask that people read ALL of my post and afford it due consideration before launching personal attacks on me.
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  #90  
Old 01-16-2009, 01:13 AM
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I didn't say the Netherlands was Gomorrah, or make any conclusions at all on the subject. I merely stated a set of conditions which exist, nothing more.

Euthanasia has long been practiced covertly in the United States and I presume in virtually every other country. Dying people are often given overdoses of morphine to "insure that they do not suffer"....and in truth, I have no quarrel with that. However, active euthanasia can be a "slippery slope", and the United States has toyed with it on occasion. Until the early 1960s, for example, it was common practice to set Down Syndrome newborns on one side of hospital nurseries and ignore them until they died. My mother was an obstetric nurse and witnessed it many times. And how many of you know someone with Down Syndrome who is over 40? Anyone?

I do think some people have misread my original post and believe I was comparing apples and oranges. I was, more accurately, discussing two separate though related subjects in a single post. Furthermore, I was responding to the post immediately preceding mine. I do apologize for any misunderstanding but do ask that people read ALL of my post and afford it due consideration before launching personal attacks on me.
50 years ago people with down syndrome didn't arrive at 40, cause they had problems at heart. mostly died teenager. now they live more, I know some and they are more of 40.
Dear Dave, I don't want you get angry with me, I apologize. I love to talk and to share ideas and oppinions with everybody.
Euthanasia is the biggest problem of this time. all countries here are making new laws.because only in this time life can go on thanks to machines.the idea is that each person must write a will saying that if in the future, by means of an illness he must to live switched on a machine and to soffer, doctors must to switched off.
Of course , it isn't in all Europe, I live in Italy, and here people that is death brain from 20 years are still switched on the machine 'cause Vatican doesn't want any law.
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  #91  
Old 01-16-2009, 01:19 AM
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I entirely agree that it's a major problem--medicine has advanced to the point where we can keep someone's vital signs operating, long after they have ceased to be "alive" in the sense of consciousness.

However, I do think we've strayed very far from the original topic of this thread. And perhaps we had better return to it.
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  #92  
Old 01-16-2009, 01:32 AM
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I entirely agree that it's a major problem--medicine has advanced to the point where we can keep someone's vital signs operating, long after they have ceased to be "alive" in the sense of consciousness.

However, I do think we've strayed very far from the original topic of this thread. And perhaps we had better return to it.
I must apologize for my poor English (It isn't easy to understand me, I think)
The topic is DP. I work in two organisations here of human rights, that are against DP. and lately, I see a lot of movements in USA that are doing a lot to abolish it.
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Old 01-16-2009, 01:52 AM
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There is the practice of assisted suicide in the Netherlands, however it is strictly monitored and there are tight regulations concerning the practice. People have to be assessed as sound mind, they must have a condition that is terminal, and they must be able to take the medicine themselves, but they can be "assisted". The assistance takes the form, of another holding the cup, while the patient drinks the medicine. The entire operation is filmed for legal reasons, and a doctor MUST prescribe the medicine.

IMO assisted suicide is humane, and reasonable. Here in the UK we will not allow a suffering animal to continue to suffer, it would be euthanized, however we do not afford humans the same consideration!

This is straying from the topic, but as it had been brought up, I thought I would just add the limited knowledge I have to the pot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveMoff View Post
I didn't say the Netherlands was Gomorrah, or make any conclusions at all on the subject. I merely stated a set of conditions which exist, nothing more.

Euthanasia has long been practiced covertly in the United States and I presume in virtually every other country. Dying people are often given overdoses of morphine to "insure that they do not suffer"....and in truth, I have no quarrel with that. However, active euthanasia can be a "slippery slope", and the United States has toyed with it on occasion. Until the early 1960s, for example, it was common practice to set Down Syndrome newborns on one side of hospital nurseries and ignore them until they died. My mother was an obstetric nurse and witnessed it many times. And how many of you know someone with Down Syndrome who is over 40? Anyone?

I do think some people have misread my original post and believe I was comparing apples and oranges. I was, more accurately, discussing two separate though related subjects in a single post. Furthermore, I was responding to the post immediately preceding mine. I do apologize for any misunderstanding but do ask that people read ALL of my post and afford it due consideration before launching personal attacks on me.
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  #94  
Old 01-16-2009, 04:35 PM
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There is the practice of assisted suicide in the Netherlands, however it is strictly monitored and there are tight regulations concerning the practice. People have to be assessed as sound mind, they must have a condition that is terminal, and they must be able to take the medicine themselves, but they can be "assisted". The assistance takes the form, of another holding the cup, while the patient drinks the medicine. The entire operation is filmed for legal reasons, and a doctor MUST prescribe the medicine.

IMO assisted suicide is humane, and reasonable. Here in the UK we will not allow a suffering animal to continue to suffer, it would be euthanized, however we do not afford humans the same consideration!

This is straying from the topic, but as it had been brought up, I thought I would just add the limited knowledge I have to the pot.
Yeah, good points. People should not be forced to endure undue suffering if they don't want to.
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Old 01-18-2009, 06:10 AM
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I still read that 60 % think that is better to die, please, think again, There isn't any reason to think that is better to die, please think again! Mostly of you are christians, and you are against abortion . why do you think so ?
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Old 02-14-2009, 07:09 PM
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as a mother of a son doing life at the age of 25 .I think that life is harder , there is no way out , nothing but yrs of wasted life for hime and us . He feels that death atleast you know when you get out and can get your self ready. They both are to hard to live with. I keep thing when i'm gone he has noone!
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Old 03-14-2009, 02:06 PM
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I married a man on the row in 2005 and we fought to free him, because her killed no one. Still, the one option that he has never wanted attorneys to look to is life in prison. Those who tell themselves that life in a cell is preferable to death miss the concept of living being more than simply breathing air. They also do not realize exactly what life in prison without parole actually means. My husband knows too well after two decades waiting to be executed.

The person that spends endless decades locked away either spends long years in a seclusion cell where the demons of his own mind consume him or they end up alone as surrounded by the worst of our society. All are daily subject to torment instigated by inmates and staff alike and as they age even defending themselves from physical attack becomes less and less an option. They almost always grow old cut off from the world and forgotten by those that have meant the most to them even if those they love are still alive. The majority are abandoned within the first few years and left to suffer alone.

One of my greatest fears would be that my husband would grow old in a place where the elderly and extremely sick receive no better diet, healthcare or treatment mentally or physically than younger inmates. I know the very real but hidden horrors of free world nursing homes and can imagine the nightmare that a seventy-five year old inmate with no control of his bodily functions and no one to care what happens to him will suffer. The horrors do occur in our part of the world and they are certain to exist to a far greater degree in a prison geriatric unit where even if a loved has remained faithful for decades the inmate will be refused their comfort in his dying moments.

Death simply frightens mainstream America and we go to great degrees to extend our lives in every possible way. Yet, I am from a line of people who have faced death not with fear but with dignity as refusing to have surgeries that would have extended their earthly existence a few more years, but gave them not a single day of life. Mankind was created to need the natural world and other people. We are meant to use our minds in order to be useful in the world around us. Shut us off from the sunlight, deprive of us love and companionship and force us to exist helpless and hopeless and there is no longer life. We only breath air.

As for what is occurring in our country. We are selectively targeting the poor everyday and we have for many decades. Lack of health care, poor nutrition, inadequate heating and a long list of other needs plague those who have never committed any crime. It is a fact that at least 100,000 poor Americans who have committed no crime reside in prison cells along with over a million who committed nonviolent crimes. The vast majority of the over 2.5 million currently incarcerated share a couple of things in common. They were poor upon arrest and are now assured to never have more, because they are convicted felons.

The rates of incarceration have soared in recent decades with the nation ignoring the implications. As the economy worsens and the need for jobs rise, we build prisons. There are construction jobs, jobs for prison staff and all of those to whom the tasks of providing food, clothing, etc. fall to suddenly profit. Thus, by the so-called trickle down effect, many in the nation get some sort of financial boost. Now, consider that 80% of the prison populations are between 18 and 25 years of age or the ages that able bodied men and women would seek to begin a career that might see them through life. Not only does the economy get a shot in the arm by the new prison jobs and hundreds of thousands pulled from the workforce, but some politician gets to stand on a podium at a election time and declare unemployment has drastically dropped in his impoverished district.

It is just so coldhearted a game that we play. The latest psychological theories even ignore decades of research by renowned specialists and offer that rehab is a complete waste, because free will alone leads to a chaotic and criminal life. Prisons are no longer state institutions they are the holdings of major corporations who are one of the biggest contributors to campaign funds and who influence political policy and even the nation’s federal and state laws to a degree that should frighten us all to our wits. Locking away the poor is now big business and the cry to increase execution means the construction of more supermax units, more guards and more profit for many others, so it is heeded by those in control.

For those who feel that it sounds insane, they should consider that not until the 1800’s were black men freed and only after millions had been slaughtered for the sake of profit. Millions never survived the trip from their homeland amidst the most horrid of squalor and racked by starvation and disease. Those who landed in America were then declared less than human and faced horrid abuse and deprivation. Yet, this was not our first sin. Native Americans did not receive the right to be called citizens of the land that belonged to them to begin with until 1924, I believe the year was. Sadly, by the time that we stopped our slaughter, we had reduced many hundreds of nations whose population was estimated by lower figures to be three million but that was actually likely closer to eight or nine million to a mere handful of survivors.

White Americans of all classes once had the legal right to kill black and Native Americans freely if the so-called savage races disobeyed the laws laid down against them and most whites who saw the chance available to them took advantage of the privilege. We have targeted and committed atrocities against Irish Americans, German Americans, Japanese Americans, Muslim Americans and a long list of others. The land of the free has throughout its history had its chosen to persecute and today is no exception.

The financial boom of past decades is ended and will not return. We live in what is now called a “service society” that provides low-paying jobs which offer no security and no benefits. We are in a mess that many of the best economists have warned that we would come to for decades. And do not dare believe the president who assures you that all is well economically, because he is by law provided the explicit right to lie to the American public regarding the economy in order to avoid a public scare that could in an instant send the stock market plummeting.

The facts are clear. The middle-class is steadily declining and the rates of poverty increasing. Fewer and fewer new cars will be seen our highways, because Americans no longer manufacture automobiles which cost us hundreds of thousands of high paying jobs. Even feeding ourselves will become harder and harder, because Americans no longer produce the majority of our own food. We willingly allowed family farms to be lost to mega corporations, because we got a ten cent price cut on products while the events were taking place. However, there is now a price to pay with those farmers no longer making purchases that had kept some communities alive and their goods no longer hauled by our truckers who bought gas at local stations and ate at local diners. Feed and hardware stores that depended on them were lost and so were local grocery stores and a variety of other businesses that depended on the combined incomes of all.

Americans can no longer even buy Levi jeans that were made in Texas for a century. We wear clothes made in China or a third world country where major manufacturers exploit starving children. I have watched area communities die because the timber is gone and the logging industry along with it. Our lumber is now imported. Men who once kept a new truck in the yard now stay home, drive clunkers and get drunk, because they are too old to start over in another profession. Of course, the new welfare laws assure that there will be a multitude of the new American slaves to work menial jobs for pay that can by no means provide for even a single person and certainly not a family. The wealthier of us will get their Big Mac’s and super size fries or some poor mother's children will starve, because she would prefer to try to go to school and look for a better paying job.

The trickle down effect works in reverse and the rougher things get the more of the poor who will be locked away, starved and left to every ill that can possibly take them from society and provide opportunity for the rest. If anything supports my theory it is the sad fact that one of the only American industries left that has shown steady growth for the last three decades are prison corporations. Few people realize that as our government was cutting deeply into programs that help the poor, our illustrious congressman at the same time was sneaking in the bills that provided billions for corporate bailouts and which cut the tax rate for American corporations to such a degree that even some worth multibillions received tax rebates rather than paying in to the IRS. This includes prison conglomerates. And yes, this is the American way and it is every American with less than millions in the bank who are now at risk.

Recall, the American people ignored Hitler’s attempt to wipe out the Jewish race until the bombs threatened to land directly on our individual doorsteps. I assure you that we as a nation have grown no wiser since.
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  #98  
Old 03-14-2009, 02:34 PM
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I just don't know what to say - fantastic post!!!


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Originally Posted by Eldon's wife View Post
I married a man on the row in 2005 and we fought to free him, because her killed no one. Still, the one option that he has never wanted attorneys to look to is life in prison. Those who tell themselves that life in a cell is preferable to death miss the concept of living being more than simply breathing air. They also do not realize exactly what life in prison without parole actually means. My husband knows too well after two decades waiting to be executed.

The person that spends endless decades locked away either spends long years in a seclusion cell where the demons of his own mind consume him or they end up alone as surrounded by the worst of our society. All are daily subject to torment instigated by inmates and staff alike and as they age even defending themselves from physical attack becomes less and less an option. They almost always grow old cut off from the world and forgotten by those that have meant the most to them even if those they love are still alive. The majority are abandoned within the first few years and left to suffer alone.

One of my greatest fears would be that my husband would grow old in a place where the elderly and extremely sick receive no better diet, healthcare or treatment mentally or physically than younger inmates. I know the very real but hidden horrors of free world nursing homes and can imagine the nightmare that a seventy-five year old inmate with no control of his bodily functions and no one to care what happens to him will suffer. The horrors do occur in our part of the world and they are certain to exist to a far greater degree in a prison geriatric unit where even if a loved has remained faithful for decades the inmate will be refused their comfort in his dying moments.

Death simply frightens mainstream America and we go to great degrees to extend our lives in every possible way. Yet, I am from a line of people who have faced death not with fear but with dignity as refusing to have surgeries that would have extended their earthly existence a few more years, but gave them not a single day of life. Mankind was created to need the natural world and other people. We are meant to use our minds in order to be useful in the world around us. Shut us off from the sunlight, deprive of us love and companionship and force us to exist helpless and hopeless and there is no longer life. We only breath air.

As for what is occurring in our country. We are selectively targeting the poor everyday and we have for many decades. Lack of health care, poor nutrition, inadequate heating and a long list of other needs plague those who have never committed any crime. It is a fact that at least 100,000 poor Americans who have committed no crime reside in prison cells along with over a million who committed nonviolent crimes. The vast majority of the over 2.5 million currently incarcerated share a couple of things in common. They were poor upon arrest and are now assured to never have more, because they are convicted felons.

The rates of incarceration have soared in recent decades with the nation ignoring the implications. As the economy worsens and the need for jobs rise, we build prisons. There are construction jobs, jobs for prison staff and all of those to whom the tasks of providing food, clothing, etc. fall to suddenly profit. Thus, by the so-called trickle down effect, many in the nation get some sort of financial boost. Now, consider that 80% of the prison populations are between 18 and 25 years of age or the ages that able bodied men and women would seek to begin a career that might see them through life. Not only does the economy get a shot in the arm by the new prison jobs and hundreds of thousands pulled from the workforce, but some politician gets to stand on a podium at a election time and declare unemployment has drastically dropped in his impoverished district.

It is just so coldhearted a game that we play. The latest psychological theories even ignore decades of research by renowned specialists and offer that rehab is a complete waste, because free will alone leads to a chaotic and criminal life. Prisons are no longer state institutions they are the holdings of major corporations who are one of the biggest contributors to campaign funds and who influence political policy and even the nation’s federal and state laws to a degree that should frighten us all to our wits. Locking away the poor is now big business and the cry to increase execution means the construction of more supermax units, more guards and more profit for many others, so it is heeded by those in control.

For those who feel that it sounds insane, they should consider that not until the 1800’s were black men freed and only after millions had been slaughtered for the sake of profit. Millions never survived the trip from their homeland amidst the most horrid of squalor and racked by starvation and disease. Those who landed in America were then declared less than human and faced horrid abuse and deprivation. Yet, this was not our first sin. Native Americans did not receive the right to be called citizens of the land that belonged to them to begin with until 1924, I believe the year was. Sadly, by the time that we stopped our slaughter, we had reduced many hundreds of nations whose population was estimated by lower figures to be three million but that was actually likely closer to eight or nine million to a mere handful of survivors.

White Americans of all classes once had the legal right to kill black and Native Americans freely if the so-called savage races disobeyed the laws laid down against them and most whites who saw the chance available to them took advantage of the privilege. We have targeted and committed atrocities against Irish Americans, German Americans, Japanese Americans, Muslim Americans and a long list of others. The land of the free has throughout its history had its chosen to persecute and today is no exception.

The financial boom of past decades is ended and will not return. We live in what is now called a “service society” that provides low-paying jobs which offer no security and no benefits. We are in a mess that many of the best economists have warned that we would come to for decades. And do not dare believe the president who assures you that all is well economically, because he is by law provided the explicit right to lie to the American public regarding the economy in order to avoid a public scare that could in an instant send the stock market plummeting.

The facts are clear. The middle-class is steadily declining and the rates of poverty increasing. Fewer and fewer new cars will be seen our highways, because Americans no longer manufacture automobiles which cost us hundreds of thousands of high paying jobs. Even feeding ourselves will become harder and harder, because Americans no longer produce the majority of our own food. We willingly allowed family farms to be lost to mega corporations, because we got a ten cent price cut on products while the events were taking place. However, there is now a price to pay with those farmers no longer making purchases that had kept some communities alive and their goods no longer hauled by our truckers who bought gas at local stations and ate at local diners. Feed and hardware stores that depended on them were lost and so were local grocery stores and a variety of other businesses that depended on the combined incomes of all.

Americans can no longer even buy Levi jeans that were made in Texas for a century. We wear clothes made in China or a third world country where major manufacturers exploit starving children. I have watched area communities die because the timber is gone and the logging industry along with it. Our lumber is now imported. Men who once kept a new truck in the yard now stay home, drive clunkers and get drunk, because they are too old to start over in another profession. Of course, the new welfare laws assure that there will be a multitude of the new American slaves to work menial jobs for pay that can by no means provide for even a single person and certainly not a family. The wealthier of us will get their Big Mac’s and super size fries or some poor mother's children will starve, because she would prefer to try to go to school and look for a better paying job.

The trickle down effect works in reverse and the rougher things get the more of the poor who will be locked away, starved and left to every ill that can possibly take them from society and provide opportunity for the rest. If anything supports my theory it is the sad fact that one of the only American industries left that has shown steady growth for the last three decades are prison corporations. Few people realize that as our government was cutting deeply into programs that help the poor, our illustrious congressman at the same time was sneaking in the bills that provided billions for corporate bailouts and which cut the tax rate for American corporations to such a degree that even some worth multibillions received tax rebates rather than paying in to the IRS. This includes prison conglomerates. And yes, this is the American way and it is every American with less than millions in the bank who are now at risk.

Recall, the American people ignored Hitler’s attempt to wipe out the Jewish race until the bombs threatened to land directly on our individual doorsteps. I assure you that we as a nation have grown no wiser since.
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Do not worry if you have built your castles in the air. They are where they should be. Now put the foundations under them. ~ Henry David Thoreau

America - land of the free, home of the incarcerated.

The USA has 5% of the worlds population and 25% of the the worlds prisoners.
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  #99  
Old 03-15-2009, 02:02 AM
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Life is always being alive, even when you have to spend this life in prison. You have the chance to find a sense in it.
You get a chance.
Why do people think its a release even for the inmates family to have them executed? Because then you can go on in life?
How stupid is that?
Show me how to go on in life when you have to look in your loved ones eyes when they kill him? When that will be the last time you see him alive? Strepped on a guerney, killed in front of you?
How will you ever go on in life after watching that? Tell me!
Yes, I know that alot of guys are looking for death when they had to spend years on death row, especially in Polunsky. They feel it must be alot better than a life inthere.
Because its no life. It says alot about the treatment, the situation inthere. We should LISTEN.
Yes
they think like that because all the justic does is burying them alive in these prisons.
All alot of families do is leaving them alone!
Thats where we are asked for to do something, to give them back a life, even when it will be behind bars forever.
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  #100  
Old 03-21-2009, 06:51 AM
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Maybe I'm confused about something, but why wasn't the original CNN poll conducted among DR inmates??? Wouldn't that provide more insightful information????

Why would CNN ask a group of (mostly) uninformed people about their preference between two horrible choices (?). Isn't this uncomfortably like "Sophie's Choice" (your son or your daughter...???)

How could any of us truly understand, unless we faced execution ourselves?????

My friends on DR are fighting with all their strength, for every minute of life. They have NOT given up.

I've noticed that there is a lot of discussion in the media ABOUT the death penalty and DR inmates, but very little communication WITH them.

Doesn't that seem strange??????

I don't know about you all, but the more I get to know a person, the harder it is to despise them.

I can't help but wonder whether that might be part of the reason that most of the general population has so little personal knowledge about death row inmates. They are hidden away. They are hard to reach. Visitation is VERY restricted.

Perhaps that kind of collective ignorance is what makes this issue "easier" on the consciences of all those (including myself) whose tax dollars support executions.

Last edited by saracmc; 03-21-2009 at 07:20 AM..
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