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The War on Drugs - and the results of it A war against drugs, or against families?

View Poll Results: people who get drug and or related cases should get sentenced to?
some kind of rehab to overcome addiction 512 94.29%
go straight to jail - "I have no sympathy for DOPERS!" 31 5.71%
Voters: 543. You may not vote on this poll

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  #101  
Old 09-11-2010, 11:05 PM
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I think prison is often time appropriate, but there should be drug/alcohol/criminal thinking classes incorporated into their sentence!

Even though my loved one is in for alcohol/drugs, I know in my heart that rehab would have been like a slap on the wrist for him, and incarceration is what he needed for a wake up call!
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  #102  
Old 09-17-2010, 09:28 PM
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I DISAGREE WITH THE POLL PRESENTED. I feel like, at the very worst, it should be decided exactly how assigning a jury is supposed to be ran as well. At the worst, the sentencing should be decided from our peers. Honestly, if not, how the fuck can anybody else know you enough to be able to appropriately judge you?


If you want my honest opinion though, I think all drug cases should be thrown out if they didn't result in theft, physical injury, or anything outside of just the simple fact of having drugs.
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  #103  
Old 01-06-2011, 08:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scd123 View Post
I think prison is often time appropriate, but there should be drug/alcohol/criminal thinking classes incorporated into their sentence!

Even though my loved one is in for alcohol/drugs, I know in my heart that rehab would have been like a slap on the wrist for him, and incarceration is what he needed for a wake up call!
I agree with you, My husband is currently waiting his sentence..Of course I wish he could get home tomorrow but I know if he didnt do some kind of incarceration he would go back to it..This is his first time being in trouble but they waited long enough to pick him up so they could pin some serious charges on him, which really stinks ..I wish they would have just picked him up when it was small so he could just get a year time and learn from it, but thats how it happens, when they warn someone so much and they dont listen they will just keep building the case.. I do think that rehab programs should be more available but some incarceration is needed. The amount of time for drug offenses, esp the drug he is being charged with is just crazy though.
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  #104  
Old 04-13-2011, 09:38 PM
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I really think there are other options that should be explored.
If you have no sympathy you've obviously never accepted that addiction is a disease and that's ok for you.
If you commit crime, you should do the time. There does have to be something to help those who want to get help. And some how I think it should be much harder to get drugs inside than it is.
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  #105  
Old 05-11-2011, 05:11 PM
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I don't believe that addicts belong with murderers, rapists, etc. I feel an addiction should be treated as an illness, not a crime.
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  #106  
Old 05-11-2011, 06:02 PM
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What do you do with the person who deals to make money...no habit, doesn't use any drugs? Set up by informant to help him get off the streets ( or so the story went ) made a whopping 100.00 and gave the rest to the informant to find a place to stay and pay a phone bill....well to make a long story short my son is in prison and the informant never served a day......
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  #107  
Old 05-11-2011, 06:06 PM
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I DISAGREE WITH THE POLL PRESENTED. I feel like, at the very worst, it should be decided exactly how assigning a jury is supposed to be ran as well. At the worst, the sentencing should be decided from our peers. Honestly, if not, how the fuck can anybody else know you enough to be able to appropriately judge you?


If you want my honest opinion though, I think all drug cases should be thrown out if they didn't result in theft, physical injury, or anything outside of just the simple fact of having drugs.
YOU Are right!!!!!
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  #108  
Old 06-02-2011, 08:39 AM
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I think prison first then porale to drug program. People who are addicted and being forced into a drug rehab arentgonna do sh*t but fake it till you make it. I think even if they say they are ready deep down they will be scared. I feel if your forcedinto rehab they will do they time and relapse when they get out. Some clean time in prison will give them enough of a vaca from drugs that when they are released from prison and paroled into a rehab they may have a more positive outlook and their game face on to beat their disease which will increase their chances of being successful
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  #109  
Old 06-02-2011, 11:49 AM
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I know several addicts who have spent time in prison. All of whom agree that there are just as many drugs available in prison as on the outside. Some prisons do have sobriety programs, no question of that and that is as it should be. I do know of facilities that do not have so much as a copy of the AA book in the prison library. Those books cost $7.50 apiece, and AA will send them anywhere someone might want to try to start a group. If there's an excuse for not having even 12-Step programs available to inmates (since they cost absolutely nothing), I'd like to know what it is.

I don't think anyone is talking about "assigning juries". A number of states have "drug courts" for non-violent offenders which generally offer treatment or probation with required sobriety to first-time or small-time offenders. I know a number of "graduates" and all in all, they seem to be doing well.

Quite agree that no one should be locked up for "possession". As long as someone is not intruding on someone else's life, it's really no one's business. The moment someone commits a crime to support a habit or while under the influence--that's an entirely different matter. For a common example: I don't care what someone smokes, drinks, or what have you at home, but the moment they get behind the wheel of a car, they become a potential threat to everyone else on the road.
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  #110  
Old 06-02-2011, 02:41 PM
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This has become A HOT TOPIC ON msnbc. Some really good conversations are taking place on the fact that there are just too many non-violent inmates locked up and these people should be in programs or some other options instead of doing time. An interesting point brought up was that most budgets for prisons far exceed the budgets for schools. I am going to continue to watch and see what is going to be done with the pending legislation in Washington.
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  #111  
Old 06-02-2011, 03:05 PM
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That's an excellent point--I wonder how the "lock 'em up and throw away the key" people feel about PAYING for it? We have far too many non-violent offenders in prison now....the only justification for prison that I can see is to protect society from violence. That does not apply to the majority of drug offenders.

There was a judge in my former home town who was fond of "creative sentencing" in some cases. Among other things, he sentenced a drunk driver to pick up litter along roadsides until he had collected (I think) 50 pounds of beer cans. He also put a guy who was caught growing marijuana to work tending the gardens in a city park. It cost nothing, benefited the community, and saved the cost of keeping I know not how many people in the county jail.
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  #112  
Old 06-02-2011, 07:47 PM
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I think they should go to jail, but receive treatment while there. They broke the law, so I still think they need to serve some time. Plus, rehab doesn't work unless the person wants it. Most people will just take advantage of rehab so they can avoid jail.
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  #113  
Old 06-02-2011, 08:08 PM
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Forgive the sarcasm, but can anyone here say they have never broken the law without lying? At every moment of every day, every American is subject to more than 6,000 laws. Do you know you are obeying them? Do you even know what they are?

The best response I know of to any "they broke the law" argument is Stanley Milgram's "Obedience To Authority" experiment. Highly recommended even if you only have time for the Wikipedia.
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  #114  
Old 06-02-2011, 08:12 PM
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Forgive the sarcasm, but can anyone here say they have never broken the law without lying? At every moment of every day, every American is subject to more than 6,000 laws. Do you know you are obeying them? Do you even know what they are?

The best response I know of to any "they broke the law" argument is Stanley Milgram's "Obedience To Authority" experiment. Highly recommended even if you only have time for the Wikipedia.
If you're referring to my post, I wasn't trying to offend anyone. It's just my opinion.
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  #115  
Old 06-02-2011, 09:24 PM
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To which you are entitled, as is everyone. I would recommend, mind, that you consider at least briefly how you developed it. Indeed, everyone should.
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  #116  
Old 06-03-2011, 10:14 AM
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To which you are entitled, as is everyone. I would recommend, mind, that you consider at least briefly how you developed it. Indeed, everyone should.
No, I think my opinion is fine. Thanks for your concern though.
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  #117  
Old 06-03-2011, 04:10 PM
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I'm not sure how detailed my explanation of drug courts may have been, nor do I know how many states have them. Drug courts are, as a rule, made available only to first-time offenders or to those facing comparatively minor charges. A conviction in drug court is a criminal conviction like any other. The principal difference is that the presumptive jail sentence is generally stayed pending completion of treatment, a period of probation with sobriety as a condition and random drug testing, attending sobriety meetings, etc., along with whatever other conditions the court may see fit to impose. Should the person successfully meet all of the court's conditions, any jail/prison sentence is suspended (in some cases, any fine is suspended as well). If the person fails to meet ANY of the court's conditions (and as a rule no second chances are given), they go to jail or to prison. No one "gets off easy" and the role of the court alters from "be good and I won't hit you" to "behave yourself and you will be rewarded". It does work, and for every person that does not pull a stint in jail, the state saves some cash.

Somewhat off the topic but at least in a similar vein, a similar approach is used in some non-violent offenses (usually property crimes) in that offenders can be sent to a "diversionary program". Again, this usually involves a term of probation, during which the offender is to make full restitution to the victim. If restitution and other terms of probation are met, the case is settled and often, the offender does not even have a criminal record. Once again, if the terms of probation are not met, the usual sentence is imposed.

Some undoubtedly have mixed feelings about this sort of thing, but speaking only for myself, if someone breaks my window or steals my car, I'd like my window fixed or my car back. Knowing that someone paid a fine or spent some time in jail (or more likely, doing community service) really doesn't fix the original problem, does it?
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  #118  
Old 06-03-2011, 05:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveMoff View Post
That's an excellent point--I wonder how the "lock 'em up and throw away the key" people feel about PAYING for it? We have far too many non-violent offenders in prison now....the only justification for prison that I can see is to protect society from violence. That does not apply to the majority of drug offenders.

There was a judge in my former home town who was fond of "creative sentencing" in some cases. Among other things, he sentenced a drunk driver to pick up litter along roadsides until he had collected (I think) 50 pounds of beer cans. He also put a guy who was caught growing marijuana to work tending the gardens in a city park. It cost nothing, benefited the community, and saved the cost of keeping I know not how many people in the county jail.
Now those are creative ideas. Most drug offenders really need counseling and they aren't getting it in prisons. Its time to get more programs and more rehabs. AA and NA don't cost anything so I ask why aren't there more meetings in prison available?
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Old 06-03-2011, 06:06 PM
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Quote:
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I'm not sure how detailed my explanation of drug courts may have been, nor do I know how many states have them. Drug courts are, as a rule, made available only to first-time offenders or to those facing comparatively minor charges. A conviction in drug court is a criminal conviction like any other. The principal difference is that the presumptive jail sentence is generally stayed pending completion of treatment, a period of probation with sobriety as a condition and random drug testing, attending sobriety meetings, etc., along with whatever other conditions the court may see fit to impose. Should the person successfully meet all of the court's conditions, any jail/prison sentence is suspended (in some cases, any fine is suspended as well). If the person fails to meet ANY of the court's conditions (and as a rule no second chances are given), they go to jail or to prison. No one "gets off easy" and the role of the court alters from "be good and I won't hit you" to "behave yourself and you will be rewarded". It does work, and for every person that does not pull a stint in jail, the state saves some cash.

Somewhat off the topic but at least in a similar vein, a similar approach is used in some non-violent offenses (usually property crimes) in that offenders can be sent to a "diversionary program". Again, this usually involves a term of probation, during which the offender is to make full restitution to the victim. If restitution and other terms of probation are met, the case is settled and often, the offender does not even have a criminal record. Once again, if the terms of probation are not met, the usual sentence is imposed.

Some undoubtedly have mixed feelings about this sort of thing, but speaking only for myself, if someone breaks my window or steals my car, I'd like my window fixed or my car back. Knowing that someone paid a fine or spent some time in jail (or more likely, doing community service) really doesn't fix the original problem, does it?

Ok that great and thats your opinion, but I am NOT changing mine!
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  #120  
Old 06-04-2011, 06:17 AM
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Personally, I think that being in prison was a nice wake up call for my Boo. I would appreciate the "system" have a rehab program for them to attend in jail as well. Yes, there is as much dope in jail as there is on the streets. However, it's up to the addict whether they are going to accept and do their time or if they are gonig to stay caught up in their addiction.

Where he's at, they have AA and NA, but that's it. I do have to say this time that he has is the best thing that's happened for him and for us. I know there are people who will look at this adn say that I am being selfish, it's for real. He and I have both talked about it. While it sucks, it's what he needed to get his right mind together!
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  #121  
Old 06-04-2011, 12:51 PM
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I'm all for treatment programs for inmates and in fact work with one. I am astonished, however, at how many facilities not only have no programs, they do not so much as have an AA/NA book in the prison library. Obviously there are other programs which work for many....they have books and literature as well.

Those of us who have friends on the inside can help. Just ask your friend or penpal if there is any help available for people who want to stay sober in their particular facility. If there isn't, ask if they'd like a book or books, or if they'd be willing to donate them to the prison library. An AA book is less than $10 if I recall correctly--both they and Rational Recovery will send a packet of literature to an inmate at no charge (you might have to pay postage in some cases). If Alcoholics Victorious or Celebrate Recovery is more your style....they have material as well.

AA is not for everyone, but the nice thing about it is that anyone can start a meeting for practically no cost--if you know the basic principles, you can almost certainly get by without a book at least for a while. All you need is a meeting space. I've actually heard of a group of inmates who hold "meetings" from opposite sides of the tier without leaving their cells. Hey, whatever works....
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  #122  
Old 06-05-2011, 10:24 AM
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I don't believe that addicts belong with murderers, rapists, etc. I feel an addiction should be treated as an illness, not a crime.
And don't forget some of these 'murderers, rapists, etc...' might have a mother on this site for support...
My son is doing a manditory sentence for drugs. You have to hate those 20 year old drug laws that make no freakin sense at all.
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  #123  
Old 06-06-2011, 02:46 PM
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I don't believe that addicts belong with murderers, rapists, etc. I feel an addiction should be treated as an illness, not a crime.

I so agree w/u on this !!
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  #124  
Old 06-16-2011, 12:55 AM
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I agree. My fiancée is sitting on 3 class A felonies for cocaine charges ( 3 little tiny bags ) and they r trying to slam him with 20 do 10

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  #125  
Old 06-21-2011, 07:01 AM
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rediculously long sentences for drug offenses, non-violent offenders integrated with violent offenders, few or zero programs for those with addictions...a recipe for disaster!!! System is broken and we need to fight for reform!!! No matter what your opinion, there is always room for improvement! ALWAYS
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