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  #1  
Old 04-20-2017, 01:45 PM
Brandon Wright Brandon Wright is offline
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Default Mental health in prisons

There is not enough mental health services in the prison system. For a great documentary on the mentally ill leaving prison, watch "Released". A great documentary.
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Old 04-26-2017, 12:15 AM
Charmseyra Charmseyra is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Wright View Post
There is not enough mental health services in the prison system. For a great documentary on the mentally ill leaving prison, watch "Released". A great documentary.
You're right.. I hope your documentary is good!Where can we watch? at youtube? Looking forward to it,,
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Old 04-27-2017, 09:35 PM
onparoleinTO onparoleinTO is offline
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It's not just that there aren't enough mental health services in prison, though that's doubtless true. It's that prison is itself the largest mental health service in many countries - that is, there are more people with diagnosed (let alone undiagnosed) mental health issues in jail than there are in any other kind of facility or treatment, where we spend a lot more money on each of them and get worse results. This could itself well be termed insane behavior - but by the system, not by the prisoners!
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Old 09-10-2017, 08:45 AM
Roumelio Roumelio is offline
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In relation to the comment as directly above:

Unfortunately there was a time period where countries like the United Kingdom and the United States started shutting down their psych wards. This continued until the 1990s. Now we are wondering what to do with people see as below for my thoughts regarding institutionalisation in the prison system.

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Now, some people get sick (my own personal experience) they act on the impulses of their mental illness and do stupid things that put them in prison. I am a survivor of this whole endemic issue. Any time I feel my impulse control getting low because of my anxiety I ask a hospital to take duty of care of me. Some people particularly in the United States don't have that luxury. They can't afford to go to a hospital and even if they did go to a hospital the services would not be there any longer waiting for them.

This is what happens when you take the mental out of mental hospitals and have only left a hospital. People through their own failings do terrible things. I don't condone the crime, but the cracks started because we began a process I don't agree with 50 years ago of shutting down psychiatric institutions. The few that remain now are overloaded, and as a result certain people with certain failings and a proven history of having serious mental health issues as mitigating circumstances end up in the psych units in prisons rather than hospitals.

If anyone would like my opinion on the matter there it is. We need less prison beds and more hospital beds. I don't fail the prison system for trying to do a job in assisting people along the way to getting back to a state of "normalcy." I do fail the state that people with known mental health issues end up being locked up in prison rather than a psych ward before they commit a crime that sees them in prison.

Now the root of this problem was escalated by what happened under the Nixon and later Ronald Reagan over the period of the 1970s an 1980s. It got to a point where people were rapidly deinstitutionalised and where the process of deinstitutionalisation was thrust upon certain people leading to a point where people who should be institutionalised no longer are. The prevailing argument since has been "claimed" to be that the procedures and processes of "community care" services have been more cost effective. It is also claimed likewise that newer types of psychiatric medication have made it far more feasible to have these people released into the care of the community rather than the care of hospitals.

The consequences of the issue are that it is now far more difficult for people (such as myself) to access any sort of care from the state. Many of the people who would previously have been under state care end up as vagrants and in today's world among the treatments of prominence the most severely mentally ill end up incarcerated in correctional facilities. Meanwhile the costs of community treatment centres have been found to be roughly equated with the same costs of running state care institutions and psych wards anyhow. This even addresses the costs of the most poorly funded institutions.

Meanwhile the full issue of releasing people into the community for "better" care by community members has not been achieved. All be it that the instances of deinstiutionalisation have been positive for people suffering from mental health issues in getting them into the community there are significant groups of people, even those that cite it as a positive experience that remain in the community without the ability to work, without work, with limited social contact, and often with extremely sheltered lives.

Even where people are discharged within the community they are often discharged without adequate support leading to a revolving door of recidivism and they continue to be upgraded within the prison community sometimes under "three strike" policies to the point where they become life-long incarcerated due to what is an underlying health issue that should have been treated so in the first place.

This was not nearly what president John F. Kennedy had assumed nor wanted of community care, it is what it has become since however. Incarceration is at an all time high in the United States while access to inpatient psychiatric care is now at an all time low. While its good to be out in the community for those that cannot handle sometimes its not, and the stigmatizism leads to ghettoized communities, which in turn leads to a revolving circle of crime and punishment for people who were sick in the first place but then decided to do something heinous.




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Of course I must postface this comment in this thread by stating each persons actions are their own. I do not condone any persons actions, and this should not be seen as an act of giving support to those that commit heinous crimes. I simply understand in certain circumstances how people who were sick, end up being criminals.

Last edited by Roumelio; 09-10-2017 at 09:39 AM..
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Old 09-10-2017, 11:07 AM
Minor activist Minor activist is offline
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>Meanwhile the costs of community treatment centres have been found to be roughly equated with the same costs of running state care institutions and psych wards anyhow

That's if the community treatment centers even exist. Too often patients were released to community care that didn't even exist.

There's another way mentally ill people end up in prison. They self-medicate with illegal drugs. "Addiction and illegal activity are a package deal", one inmate wrote (Gina Panetta, horrible heartbreaking case).
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Old 09-10-2017, 11:34 AM
Roumelio Roumelio is offline
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Yes true, self medication is another one of many ways where the mentally ill end up incarcerated. It's a self fulfilling prophecy. Low availability to treatment leads to lack of treatment, lack of treatment and access to it leads to treatment being purchased from questionable sources, this further leads to purchasing illicit substances instead of drugs of care/need. In turn more people end up in jail.
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