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The War on Drugs - and the results of it A war against drugs, or against families?

View Poll Results: people who get drug and or related cases should get sentenced to?
some kind of rehab to overcome addiction 503 94.37%
go straight to jail - "I have no sympathy for DOPERS!" 30 5.63%
Voters: 533. You may not vote on this poll

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  #51  
Old 02-14-2005, 08:04 AM
pam112856 pam112856 is offline
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Sorry But I Have To Say That All Rehab Does Is Teach Them How To Pass Drug Test And Fool More People . Nine Times Out Of Ten The Ocassinal User ,starts Selling To Support His Own Habit , Then They Start Making The Stuff , The Money Is So Easy They Forget What It Can Be Like To Be The One Who Doesnt Have The Money To Buy . Some Start Stealing To Suport Their Habit . I Believe In Tough Love Programs . Maybe Real Prison For Some Of These Guys Is Not The Answer But They Need More Than Just A 6 Months Stay At A Hospital.
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  #52  
Old 02-20-2005, 06:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toi_ama
Well, I've been in recovery for over 18 years and I've seen a lot. While rehab sounds like a great idea, it's really not all that great. A person facing prison is going to choose rehab, insist they want it, and complain they don't get it, of course, but it's not very effective in the long run. What you end up with is an educated alcoholic/addict who still drinks and/or uses. That's why they don't institute rehab instead of prison or jail. It's a waste of money. I'm sorry to sound so harsh, but I'm just speaking the truth. If a person doesn't desperately want to stop drinking and/or using, they're not going to no matter what. You have to hit bottom. People who go to prison are doing a version of what every drunk does when they're puking their guts up------"Oh please God, if you make this stop, I swear I'll never do it again". And then as soon as we know we'll live, we're off and running for the next one. Same with every addict who OD's and survives or has a bad trip and survives. As soon as it's over, the disease tells us that it really wasn't so bad and that we can drink and use and control it so we won't screw up the next time.

If someone truly wants to get into recovery, every prison I know of allows the 12 step programs to come in, and it's the 12 step programs that are proven to be the one most effective means of getting into recovery and successfully staying in recovery. Therefore, there IS the best kind of help already available to them and for free----nobody pays to get it and the taxpayers don't pay for it. Therefore, I have to say that I'm not for mandated rehab. The best rehab there is is hitting a bottom so darned hard that you'll do anything to stop living like that. I've seen people go through things that I think absolutely MUST be their bottom, only to see them go back out. But for a lot of people, prison can be what saves their lives.
OK..... But what about when they give you 20-life when you have been clean for 3 years! Maybe you havent been affected the way some of us have been. Staying clean isnt an option for me. And my brother wasnt given the chance. Narrow mindedness will get you nowhere. Congrats on your clean time sorry it seems to be such a problem for you. Good luck and thank your God you are free and able to talk like that.
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  #53  
Old 02-21-2005, 06:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pam112856
Sorry But I Have To Say That All Rehab Does Is Teach Them How To Pass Drug Test And Fool More People . Nine Times Out Of Ten The Ocassinal User ,starts Selling To Support His Own Habit , Then They Start Making The Stuff , The Money Is So Easy They Forget What It Can Be Like To Be The One Who Doesnt Have The Money To Buy . Some Start Stealing To Suport Their Habit . I Believe In Tough Love Programs . Maybe Real Prison For Some Of These Guys Is Not The Answer But They Need More Than Just A 6 Months Stay At A Hospital.
Just wondering have you ever actually been to rehab?

Christophers' Mom
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  #54  
Old 02-21-2005, 07:00 PM
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I wish they would change the laws in Georgia, mine has to serve 40 months on a 10 year sentence.
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  #55  
Old 02-21-2005, 07:33 PM
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Intense drug rehab. Not at the local state run facility!
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HE'S HOME!!!!!!!!!
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  #56  
Old 06-07-2005, 07:08 PM
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I believe in drug courts -- meaning -- I believe that circumstances should be considered for possession of drugs, not just a 2-20 or some such sentence randomly thrown out there.
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  #57  
Old 06-09-2005, 07:00 PM
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  #58  
Old 08-21-2005, 01:58 PM
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Default what is safety valve??

I am not sure if this will post at the right place, but I keep reading posts about a safety valve. What is it, and how does one qualify??/
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  #59  
Old 10-07-2005, 09:56 PM
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From what I understand the 'The Safety Valve' is as follows:

The safety valve is a clause of the Crime Bill that will allow certain first-time, non-violent drug offenders to be exempted from the 5 or 10 year mandatory minimum sentences that would normally apply to them and be sentenced instead under the federal sentencing guidelines for periods as short as two years.
Hope that helps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beverlywu
I am not sure if this will post at the right place, but I keep reading posts about a safety valve. What is it, and how does one qualify??/
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  #60  
Old 10-08-2005, 07:44 PM
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My Ray got 6 years on his first offence, drugs, arghhhhh i hate them. he had 2 years probation and slipped one time, went into detox and intensive out paitent counsling. a month later his new probation officer saw the failed urine test, violated him and sent him back. The probation officer stood in court, demanded the judge give my husband 3.5 years. Fortunatly the judge listened to my husbands lawyer, and my statement. My husband still was sentanced to 6 months
With time served awaiting his hearing, and the 85% rule here in Va. he should be home in Feb . of 06.
Does jail work for stopping drug use? NO. Its gonna happen only if the addict wants it, AND if the support they receive includes their spouse and family.. Lisa
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  #61  
Old 10-09-2005, 08:16 PM
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Default My son was tricked

I know it sounds like amade up story but it,s not. My son was at his girlfriends house and got a phone call from an aquitance and was asked to go pick up drugs, was given the money and the driver was an undercover. So he got served with a secret indictment. He,s serving a 2 year sentence.
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  #62  
Old 10-10-2005, 10:32 AM
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I am studying criminology right now and I just finished doing a paper on the "crack crisis" of the late 1980s. I will paste it here if you sre interested:

“The thing I fear most for America’s youth is crack. Crack will be the downfall of most of our teenagers and will turn many of our teenagers into criminals. Only a national-level war on drugs will stamp out the problems caused by this evil drug.”

This statement, typical of the “crack crisis” of the late 1980s, is indicative of the problems drug scares cause in society. From a criminologist’s standpoint, this political statement not only deviates greatly from statistical evidence, but also diverts attention away from crucial social problems that underlie abuse, forming incorrect public perceptions.
Official data painted a much different picture of crack use than the politicians and media. In fact, “there were no prevalence statistics at all on crack; and no evidence of any sort showing that smoking crack had come to be even the preferred mode of cocaine use, much less of drug use” (Crime, 50). When looking at official evidence, a statement that crack “will be the downfall of most of our teenagers” seems puzzling. Unfortunately, the average consumer does not have or pursue access to statistical evidence, so statements like this are instrumental in forming their perceptions about the prevalence of drug use.
This trend in drug war discourse to distort the frequency of usage has been termed by criminologists as “routinization of caricature – worst cases framed as typical cases, the episodic recrafted into the epidemic” (Crime, 49). So although the evidence shows otherwise, there is a purposeful misrepresentation of frequency of drug use.
What could be the purpose of this distortion? Why would media and politicians want to misinform the public? With the media, the answer seems to be in the “appeal [of drug scares] to important groups within American society” (Crime, 51). A desire for ratings means a desire for alarming drug abuse stories. For politicians, the answer is more complex. “(T)he new chemical bogeyman afforded politicians across the ideological spectrum both an explanation for pressing public problems and an excuse for not doing much about them” (Crime, 51). In other words, politicians could avoid complex social problems that require equally complex attention and funding by blaming an “evil drug”, thus liberating themselves from any obligation from those problems.
Consequently, the result of this avoidance of underlying social problems means that the core issues like unemployment, poverty and homelessness remain basically untouched (Crime, 51). Drug scares shift the focus from social problems to the individual and their personal morality, and “they divert attention and resources from those larger problems” (Crime, 51). As a result, a perpetual downward spiral of sorts emerges – increased policing is used to control the “epidemic”, while the deeper problems remain untouched, and the urban poor, suffering from that lack of attention, turn to crime and hard drugs as a means to escape their despair and deprivation (Crime, 51). In essence, it can be said that in this way drug scares actually work counterproductively with regards to actual drug use, and their only effectiveness lies in the rewards they offer to the media and politicians who generate them.
Another contemporary example of crime that has been distorted to play on public fear is serial murder. Attention given to serial murder “continues to focus on the individual offender” (Crime, 45), even though “(i)t appears that social, legal and environmental factors play a major role in determining the prevalence of this crime” (Crime, 45). In this way, serial murder is handled in a similar way as crack, where individual morality is the main focus, and the underlying social issues are largely ignored, which can act counterproductively in preventing this type of crime.
Routinization of caricature seems to be somewhat of a factor in serial murder as well, especially in popular culture. Enter any video store and one will encounter entire sections devoted to serial murder. The average consumer can surely name at least a handful of serial murderers and perhaps even their methods. The sensationalist nature of serial murder is very attractive to the media for it’s ability to draw viewers, and thus receives more attention than is proportionate to it’s actual prevalence in relation to other crimes.
In conclusion, the motives of the media and politicians are a direct factor in the formation of public perceptions about crime. When those motives deviate from statistical evidence, the results can be seriously detrimental for society – serious social issues don’t receive the attention and funding they deserve, and the crimes that are in question may actually be perpetuated further.
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  #63  
Old 10-16-2005, 09:43 PM
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Statistics show that on the federal level first time drug offenders get an average of six years. Now granted, you don't serve all of that what with RDAP and all, but that's still a significant chunk of time. I think the drug war is rotten, myself, although my ex-husband probably never would have quit without having done a year. A year was plenty. Five, ten, 20 for dealers is pretty sick. Most dealers I know, and I have known more than my share, got into it because they are addicts. I am an addict with 2 years clean and I see it as a mental illness, an obsession, more than anything else. Thank god I'm free of it, now.
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  #64  
Old 10-18-2005, 07:13 AM
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Exclamation Twisted System

My husband got 25 years on his first offense. He was out and about doing cocain when a friend asked him to drop off some "goods" to another "friend". The goods were packed in the trunk, and when my husband got there, the house was already staked out by the FBI. My husband got 25 years for Dealing and Distribution.

After being in Prison for 5 years, the ruling was overturned by an appellate court. Ronnie was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

I agree that he shouldn't have been doing drugs, and that time serving this offense was necessary. Unfortunately, the system is so out of whack that it's easier to get drugs on the inside, than out on the streets.
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  #65  
Old 10-18-2005, 10:01 AM
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Well I never thought that I would say this but going to prison has helped my son. From a young age he started doing every drug he could. Finally he became a herion addict. Well he went through every program and mental health program that we could find. I was always running in to save my son from jail or trouble. I always prayed that a light would go off in his head and he would wake up. I have been through hell with this boy and back. I can't believe that someone who could go very far in life has chose to do this. Well last year he got sentence to 10 years and must do 5, for drugs and VOP.Before he went in it was always someone elses fault for his choices. What a change he has made. I can't believe I'm talking to the same person. He knows like I do that this is the only thing that could stop him. While on the outside he did'nt want to stop because he LIKED IT. I miss him like crazy and when I write or talk about him I cry. Drug abusers don't stop or change until they are ready. Believe me when I say I have no love for the prison system or how our love ones are treated. I know in my heart this was a good thing for my son or he would be dead. My daugther decided to join her brother with drugs and has been in a program for 5 months. She to was in and out, and I have custody of my grandson who my husband and I have raised. We have spent thousands fighting the father who have nothing to do with the child. This choice that people make to do drugs, they have no idea how they will hurt everyone around them. Please notice how I say choice because it is a choice. Its all up to a person and what you decide to do.
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  #66  
Old 02-17-2006, 03:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pam112856
Sorry But I Have To Say That All Rehab Does Is Teach Them How To Pass Drug Test And Fool More People . Nine Times Out Of Ten The Ocassinal User ,starts Selling To Support His Own Habit , Then They Start Making The Stuff , The Money Is So Easy They Forget What It Can Be Like To Be The One Who Doesnt Have The Money To Buy . Some Start Stealing To Suport Their Habit . I Believe In Tough Love Programs . Maybe Real Prison For Some Of These Guys Is Not The Answer But They Need More Than Just A 6 Months Stay At A Hospital.
Ny name is Sherrie and I'm a greatful recovering addict. I just got out of rehab in Jan. Have you been there? Let me tell you what I learned. I learned how to deal with life. I was taught by some of the most caring and loving people i've ever encountered in my life. I learned nothing about fooling tests or people. I learned how not to fool myself. I thank God everyday for Pearson Hall. Its true alot of people come out and go right back to the streets. Those folks aren't hungry for recovery. Jail is the answer for some ppl. But not all. You want someone to learn dope smarts? Send them to prison. Some come out with a worse drug problem then when they went in.
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  #67  
Old 02-17-2006, 11:41 PM
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Welcome BabyJo and thank you for posting such a positive story. You are very right that you get what you put into it though I will say that not every rehab is right for every person. It would be wonderful if everyone's story was as positive as yours and if every addict was prepared to put the effort in that you did. Congratulations and keep up the good work !!!
You should check out the addiction forum if you like, and perhaps spread some of that positive spirit you have there too. http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=202
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  #68  
Old 03-02-2006, 12:02 PM
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I too, am a recovered drug abuser like a lot of you posting replies. While I have not been to rehab or prison (or have anything against my record for that matter) I definately have realized though experience from many years of using that it's a choice to want to quit and not something that you can be forced into doing. Sure, people can help you and be supportive, but it's YOU and only YOU that can decide when you want to stop. Since drugs are so prevalent in prison albeit expensive, even if you get your a** beat down for owing big amounts to dealers while in, you'll go to any length to get your next fix. Prison may not be a place where you decide to want to quit, but a place where depending upon your intake outside of prison beforehand (esp. narcotics) your hell going through withdraw constantly isn't worth the effort of keeping up your drug habit. Rehab is basically a joke because you still have access to the street prices and you meet new aquaintances that are also court appointed and thus this makes new contacts. Drug addiction is a disease of the mind just like any other mental disorder and either people don't accept this or don't realize it. It is my opinion that within the system, it should be treated as just that and special steps should be made to understand the user and fix their abuse. Individuals with drug related charges should not be put in with people that have other convictions, period. (If drug abuse was the reason for their crimes ie: murder, this is a different story. Robbery - rehab first, prison later) They should be in a medium security prison with a medical staff and psychiatrists. Weaning them slowly off of their drug (like methadone injections for heroin users) or a full body flush with fluids while sedated could get them clean then continue with their rehabilitation while locked down with no access to availability from the outside world with even tougher checks from visitors and CO's from bringing stuff in. Expensive, yes..but the system should think about it. Go through a lesser sentence while being locked up in a prison rehab or live off the state for years and years? Have you ever seen a full blown addict? They would be eaten alive in prison and couldn't stand up for themselves because the withdraw has you so weak you can barely move. If you don't rehabilitate the mental disease, they will go right back to it when they get out. There are people in prison that were kids when they went in for drug charges and are still there and are now grown men. What have they learned now? Not to want to go back into prison? They didn't want to go in the first place. Sure, they may have become drug free in prison and won't ever do them again, but at what emotional cost to themselves and loved ones? People have sympathy for the mentally retarded because they were "born" that way. Why no sympathy for drug abusers? They weren't saying as a child, I want to grow up some day to be a crack head or a junkie, ruin my life and smash all of my hopes and dreams. I don't even want to get started about people that are in for pot charges. A good majority of prison related cases are from drug related charges or doing a crime from being on drugs. Although prison may not be a good answer for a lot of these cases, it's an answer and it will probably always stay this way. Drug abuse starts with a mental affliction that is either placed upon the offender such as a bad childhood or genetic inheritance. If you're depressed, why not stay happy all the time?

"serious social issues don’t receive the attention and funding they deserve, and the crimes that are in question may actually be perpetuated further."

Amen to that. Will any of this ever change about prison sentences? Probably not. Inadequate funding, no sympathy and ignornace will keep it from happening. I don't condone drug use and see it as an excuse for a lot of people's problems, but I still sympathize. There comes a day when you look in the mirror, you truly see yourself and realize you've had enough. I am so thankful for those who stood by me with all of my crap that I placed upon their shoulders and whose hearts I broke. If I didn't have their support I'd be turning tricks or stealing to get my next fix. There is a certain level of support that is needed, but if you know and love an abuser..be careful because they will put you down and out before they give it up even if they don't want to do what they're doing to you. Make a firm line that shouldn't be crossed and stick by it. For three years I was bangin it while pretending to live life. There is no real life. There is only a hollowed out shell of a being that has nowhere to turn to except your dealer, a spoon and a lighter and some dark corner where nobody will bother you. I have regrets, but thank GOD I was smart enough to never share needles and was lucky enough to not end up in prison. Well, there's my 30 cents. It takes experience to understand these situations, until then people judge and are misguided by what they perceive and hear. If I wasn't an abuser I would probably be yellin like the rest to send em on in to jail. If you can't beat it, let heartache beat it for you.
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  #69  
Old 03-27-2006, 02:28 PM
J.R. Davis J.R. Davis is offline
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I guess you could say I have some strong feelings on how drug cases should be handled. As we all know, there are a number of different circumstances involved. In particular, there are those who are only busted for their use and or possession of drugs. Then there are the others who thruough their addiction, commit other offenses, but are basically related to the drug addiction. Some of the other offenses are petty in nature, where there is no use of force or violence, but then there are those who use violence as an end result of their addiction.
There is also another factor involved in all of this, the individuals background... mental or physcial abuse, or a combination there of. When you couple mental and physcial abuse with addiction, you have a person who is sick... no two ways about it. As long as they have not used violence they should not be punished, but rather given the help they need, as is the same for the addict who was just busted for possession, or the one's who may have bounced a bad check to buy their dope. They need the help. Those who have used violence need help also, but they might need far more than is available.
Of course, I do not condone violence in any form. I also do not stand behind the dealers, they are the one's that need the jail time, they need to pay just for being who they are! But those are just my views.

God Bless you all, pray for our loved one's who are addicted!

JR
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Old 03-27-2006, 06:01 PM
Sandra Bouchard Sandra Bouchard is offline
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Default When did we become so nosey?

Just to remind you--America has gone into the wastelands of God's Kingdom with all of their man made laws and spiritual poverty. What other people do in their own homes is their own business. I don't do drugs, or smoke cigarettes and I rarely drink alcohol but I have no right to impose my life choices on anyone else. What we eat, smoke or drink is our business. Christ told us "what goes into the mouth is not sin...what comes out of the mouth (i.e., lying, false witnessing, accusing others) is a sin." (Matthew 15:16-20) Since you would rather believe in man's propaganda, you will be judged for accusing others. If you don't forgive others, neither will Our Father forgive us. (Matt. 6:15, Matt. 18:35, Mark 11:26) Christ said he does not accuse others but someone here does. (John 5:45) The Roman Emporer thought he was a king of kings but was not. We don't do as the Roman's do if we don't live in Rome. We need to have true liberty, true freedom of choice. Christ said to Zaccheus who sat in the tree watching the sinners go by to get down from that tree because Christ was going to live in his house. If Christ lives in your house, don't watch the sins of other people. Clean off your own stoop, first. (Matt. 7:1-5) There is one lawmaker who can save and destroy. Who are you to criticize others?(James 4:12) We do not have a Christian nation nor do we have a Christian President. He is a fake and our draconian lawmakers are fakes. Woe to them! (Matthew 23:13-39, Luke 11:46-52) I feel sorry for you if you follow the wolves in sheep's clothing. All of you Americans who are brainwashed have fallen and you aren't as smart as you think you are. Wake up America. Stop this madness today! Sandy
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Old 03-28-2006, 11:58 AM
J.R. Davis J.R. Davis is offline
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Default Prison is not the answer

Having read some of the posts on this topic, I realize that there are different circumstances that are involved here. My feeling is somewhat a simple one. Non-violent offenders who are addicted to drugs and or alcohol should be given a chance to fight their addiction, and prison is not the place to do that. You have to take into consideration each individual. What was their life like before they started using? If you really look at it, you will find that many have had serious traumatic issues before they started using. And some of those people, did not have the education or resources to seek help once they got involved in using. I have been through the 12 Step program and am still very involved in AA. But I have seen first hand those people who just did not know what to do or who to turn to. They may have mental problems as well as addiction problems. And if they have mental health issues before they started using, well their addiction was an easy thing to see coming to others but not to the individual themselves. So many people I have seen in the program, do not have the educational background or mental capacity to fully understand that they need help, therefore, they don't search for it or get it. Many people I know who have went through this, including my own wife, know they want to get off of it, they do sometimes reach out for help, but noone is there... or at least noone they know is there to recognize what is going on. If you think you know what addiction is, then you know it is an illness. You don't send people to prison just because they have cancer! Study the causes and effects of drug/alcohol use and the physical and mental handicaps that these people suffer through and you will see that it is in fact a grave and serious illness. Yes, they need help, they need love, they need support and yes they need God. But someone has to tell them about it, someone has to offer the help.

I heard a professed alcoholic make a statement just the other day, he don't like drug users being in AA meeting. His statement had to do with this very topic. He stated that "dope users who steal shit ought to be busted and put in jail". So I asked him, "what is the difference between an addict who may steal a lawnmower, compaired to an alcoholic who drives home drunk" They are both commiting a crime, but chances are the addict did not hurt anyone, but the alcoholic is taking his life and others forgranted by driving. His response to the situation I presented was; "I ain't never had an accident" and my response was; "you haven't yet".

Come on lets get real here. These folks do need help. If they are in jail, then they have hit bottom in most cases, so now is the time to educate them, offer them the help, and to me that is the bottom line.

Thanks for listening to my rant. God bless you all.

JR
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  #72  
Old 03-28-2006, 02:53 PM
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Default Addiction: A Condition not Conviction!

I wish I had a "Quick Solution" to the problem. But most of us Addicts look for a Quick Fix. I believe Addiction should be handled as a Condition, not a Conviction. Addiction should be handled with a Treatment not a Punishment. Especially since the prisons are not immune to the presence of Drugs. The System thinks by taking away their freedom they'll just quit and think twice before they use again.

WRONG! If they really looked into the problem they (C.D.C. system) would see that the Addict doesn't have The Freedom to be taken away, anyway. So they don't see it as a consiquence. The Drug takes their freedom. We as Addicts arn't going to think twice about something that helps get rid of all those "think twice issues", (temporarely of course) but it starts the cycle, that is a viscious circle.

When were locked up, it removes all Lifes issues we should be dealing with, that the prisons now control for us. Leaving us with the only problem we want to deal with and that is where to get our next fix, and we find it in their prisons. We need to be shown how to deal with Life's issues. A treatment center with the focus being on who we are as a person living in this society, what are responsibilities are, and how to handle them effectively, a Rebuilding of Self Program. NOT a focus on how to JUST STOP USING DRUGS, Obviously we JUST Can't. We need to focus on the things that we can actually use to Live Life. NOT!! How to Avoid Drugs, NOT, How to learn what the triggers are to Avoid Drugs, NOT, HOw to stay away from the people who are Using Drugs, (when thats the majority of the people we know and love) and Now they want us to Bond with complete strangers who are trying to avoid drugs and the People who use them. Based on the mere fact that we all want the same thing "To Be Drug Free".

Well I want more than that, and if I focus on "Being Drug Free", thats exactly what I will strive for "MY DRUGS FOR FREE". & thats when I exchange my Freedom to do Drugs.

In a "Nut-Cell", We need to focus on Living with Ourselves, Living with Others. Learn the skills we needed to learn as children so we grow up into responsible adults. As it stands now were adults with child like skills.
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Old 03-28-2006, 04:43 PM
witchlinblue witchlinblue is offline
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First off, welcome to PTO !!!!

I agree with much of what you say, however the last part I have a problem with. Most addicts have issues usually from childhood or early teen periods that have caused trauma of some sort that was never dealt with. Or many addicts have a pre-existing mental condition or disease that has been left untreated and they are self-medicating themselves. So long as this is ignored, an addict will never be able to over come their addiction.
As well as this, as far as the maturity part; most addicts remain at the level of maturity that they were when their addiction first started and they do not mature beyond that until they can obtain a substancial period of time clean.
You are very right about the fact that they have it all wrong, taking away their freedom as a punishment for having a health condition/disease is not the answer and you are also right, it does make it easier to focus on what their condition/disease needs. Drugs are very available in prisons. That is certainly not a secret.
Just my few cents....


Quote:
Originally Posted by SandalousNSLO
In a "Nut-Cell", We need to focus on Living with Ourselves, Living with Others. Learn the skills we needed to learn as children so we grow up into responsible adults. As it stands now were adults with child like skills.
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Old 03-28-2006, 06:38 PM
Yoosgirl Yoosgirl is offline
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Even though I have read some positive post on how jail has turned some around, that has not been my experience.
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Old 03-31-2006, 04:08 PM
LI`L SIS LI`L SIS is offline
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I have to say that prison is not the answer! I think they should be sentenced to 2 to 4 years rehab. and while they`re there they have to work to pay their way. Prison won`t keep them clean either if they really want to get the stuff. no matter what, the entire rehabilitation system needs to be fixed pronto!! Most of the councilors at my brothers facility were ex-users, which is fine, but three of them fell off the wagon and one is now doing time again. The whole thing needs alot of work. I think they throw people out way to soon. My brother was given the boot after nine weeks because they needed his bed. He went back as an out patient but ended up doing yard work (free of course) and not getting the counciling he needed. Chores are a good thing but that was bad.

LI`L SIS.
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