Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > U.S. REGIONAL FORUMS > FLORIDA > Florida General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Florida General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat Topics & Discussions relating to Prison & the Criminal Justice System in Florida that do not fit into any other Florida subforum category. Please feel free to also introduce yourself to other members in the state and talk about whatever topics come to mind that may not have anything to do with prison.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-27-2003, 05:36 PM
danielle's Avatar
danielle danielle is offline
The Specialist - Surf but be-ware!
 

Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 9,043
Thanks: 4
Thanked 101 Times in 33 Posts
Post Volunteers help felons try to regain civil rights

Volunteers help felons try to regain civil rights

By Sandra Mathers | Sentinel Staff Writer
Posted July 27, 2003


For years, George Rogers has dreamed of opening his own auto-repair shop. A mechanic for 30 years, he has saved enough money to make the dream a reality.

But under Florida law, Rogers, 46, is barred from starting a business.

He lost his civil rights -- including the ability to apply for a state license allowing him to repair cars -- when he was convicted of a felony in 1992.

"I was under the assumption my rights would be automatically restored after I served my sentence," said Rogers, who was sentenced to 11 years of probation for sexual battery in 1991. "That's not the case."

On Saturday, Rogers was among nearly 40 felons who showed up at the Hal Marston Center in Orlando for a workshop designed to help them navigate the arduous process of getting their civil rights back.

Currently, they are prohibited from voting, serving on a jury, holding public office -- and pursuing careers in more than 60 fields that require state licenses.

The free workshop -- sponsored by the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, an umbrella group of voting- and civil-rights organizations -- provided volunteers from the American Civil Liberties Union and the Florida Coalition on Black Civic Participation to help felons start the restoration process.

A half-dozen volunteers helped ex-offenders fill out one-page applications.

"We'll bundle them up and send them in bulk to the clemency board with a cover letter" for visibility, said Jim Brower, an ACLU volunteer.

At least two ex-offenders told volunteers they had applied for their civil rights several years ago and never got them, ACLU volunteer Stewart Bernstein said.

The workshop, one of two in Central Florida on Saturday, comes on the heels of a major voting-rights victory.

Last week, the state settled a lawsuit brought by the ACLU against the Department of Corrections for failing to help inmates apply for their rights before they are released, as required by law.

The settlement means about 30,000 ex-offenders released between 1992 and 2001 are likely to get their rights back soon.

That could mean good news for Jeffery Warren of Orlando, who attended the workshop. He was released from prison in 2000 after serving more than eight months for a verbal assault.

After months of being turned away by potential employers, Warren, 38, now works in his family's business recycling coat hangers.

"I threatened a guy with a knife, but I never cut him," he said. "But once they [employers] see 'felon' on your application, you're not going to get hired."

For others, the wait to regain civil rights could be a long one.

Rogers' crime is among a handful of convictions -- including DUI manslaughter, murder and drug trafficking -- that require appearance before the clemency board in Tallahassee to regain rights, according to state law. The board meets just four days a year.

Courtenay Strickland, director of the ACLU's voting-rights project, said Florida is one of just six states that does not automatically restore rights after sentences are served. She calls it a state "civil-rights crisis."

"It's pretty shocking," Strickland said in a phone interview. "The bottom line is Florida spends a lot of money and puts people through a lot of effort in a process most states find unnecessary."
__________________
Monica Danielle
***********
On September 22, 2003, my better half came home after 657 days in an Alabama prison!!!

And he's now forever free - passing away from this life and into the next - on January 9, 2010.

My Sweet Wayne
January 21, 1954 - January 9, 2010

I'll always love you.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-11-2004, 10:45 AM
flmom flmom is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Florida, USA
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default wow! other states?

Quote:
Originally Posted by danielle
Volunteers help felons try to regain civil rights

By Sandra Mathers | Sentinel Staff Writer
Posted July 27, 2003


For years, George Rogers has dreamed of opening his own auto-repair shop. A mechanic for 30 years, he has saved enough money to make the dream a reality.

But under Florida law, Rogers, 46, is barred from starting a business.

He lost his civil rights -- including the ability to apply for a state license allowing him to repair cars -- when he was convicted of a felony in 1992.

"I was under the assumption my rights would be automatically restored after I served my sentence," said Rogers, who was sentenced to 11 years of probation for sexual battery in 1991. "That's not the case."

On Saturday, Rogers was among nearly 40 felons who showed up at the Hal Marston Center in Orlando for a workshop designed to help them navigate the arduous process of getting their civil rights back.

Currently, they are prohibited from voting, serving on a jury, holding public office -- and pursuing careers in more than 60 fields that require state licenses.

The free workshop -- sponsored by the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, an umbrella group of voting- and civil-rights organizations -- provided volunteers from the American Civil Liberties Union and the Florida Coalition on Black Civic Participation to help felons start the restoration process.

A half-dozen volunteers helped ex-offenders fill out one-page applications.

"We'll bundle them up and send them in bulk to the clemency board with a cover letter" for visibility, said Jim Brower, an ACLU volunteer.

At least two ex-offenders told volunteers they had applied for their civil rights several years ago and never got them, ACLU volunteer Stewart Bernstein said.

The workshop, one of two in Central Florida on Saturday, comes on the heels of a major voting-rights victory.

Last week, the state settled a lawsuit brought by the ACLU against the Department of Corrections for failing to help inmates apply for their rights before they are released, as required by law.

The settlement means about 30,000 ex-offenders released between 1992 and 2001 are likely to get their rights back soon.

That could mean good news for Jeffery Warren of Orlando, who attended the workshop. He was released from prison in 2000 after serving more than eight months for a verbal assault.

After months of being turned away by potential employers, Warren, 38, now works in his family's business recycling coat hangers.

"I threatened a guy with a knife, but I never cut him," he said. "But once they [employers] see 'felon' on your application, you're not going to get hired."

For others, the wait to regain civil rights could be a long one.

Rogers' crime is among a handful of convictions -- including DUI manslaughter, murder and drug trafficking -- that require appearance before the clemency board in Tallahassee to regain rights, according to state law. The board meets just four days a year.

Courtenay Strickland, director of the ACLU's voting-rights project, said Florida is one of just six states that does not automatically restore rights after sentences are served. She calls it a state "civil-rights crisis."

"It's pretty shocking," Strickland said in a phone interview. "The bottom line is Florida spends a lot of money and puts people through a lot of effort in a process most states find unnecessary."
What are the other 5 states? I'm in Florida. Do you know of what states are best at letting someone get a frest start if they have a felony? thanks, sue
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-12-2004, 02:42 AM
dallaswife2b's Avatar
dallaswife2b dallaswife2b is offline
thug.lyf3_wife4lyf3
 

Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 589
Thanks: 33
Thanked 94 Times in 73 Posts
Default

That's really good to know it's a shame that convicted felons have served their time and paid their debts to society and are still not able to utilize their rights as Americans. Thank God for the volunteers trying to help people who are trying to help themselves
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Warner First In America In Restoring Felons' Rights Annette B. Virginia General Prison Talk, News, Introductions & Chit Chat 1 03-22-2013 02:37 AM
NYTimes:Suspect in '64 Civil Rights Killings Pleads Not Guilty titantoo World Prison News 0 01-07-2005 02:37 PM
Article: Easier restoration of felons' civil rights picking up steam Phil in Paris Florida News & Events 0 11-24-2004 08:57 PM
Governor Warner restoring rights to felons at quick pace FriscoLady Virginia General Prison Talk, News, Introductions & Chit Chat 7 05-18-2004 07:18 PM
Represented by Pro Bono Atty? JamesGirl Prison & Criminal Legal Help! 11 05-03-2004 07:39 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:54 AM.
Copyright © 2001- 2017 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics