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  #1  
Old 03-06-2017, 06:31 PM
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Default Food for thought: Prison food is a public health problem

Food for thought: Prison food is a public health problem


"This past fall, a new report from Prison Voice Washington detailed the decline in food quality served in the state’s correctional facilities. While incarcerated people often voice complaints about (very real) quality-of-life issues related to food service, there is a broader public health concern here: the long-term health consequences of forcing incarcerated people to consume unhealthy food."

https://www.prisonpolicy.org/blog/20...3/prison-food/
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Old 03-07-2017, 10:51 AM
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I didn't read the entire article but I will say my son has been in the system for 9+ years with a little less than 3 years to go. "PTL" All these years I look at the CRAP that he has had to eat and it literally breaks my heart. The prison he is at rarely gives out fresh fruit. Everything is heavily processed and canned. I am so thankful that my son is as health conscious as he can be ... considering where he is at. Medical and dental is also a bunch of bunk!!!!
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Old 03-07-2017, 11:20 AM
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Public health is a real issue. What happens when the inmates get out? Nobody wins by adding sick people to the free world population.

That angle might be a political loser. Here's something else to think about.

Prison Voice Washington if I understand right has been pushing it from another angle. It's an angle that might get attention in the Carolinas.

If you've run into the word "locavore" already, you already know what this is going to be about.

Every bit of food in a can from a central depot is something that a local farmer did not get to sell to the prison.

The prisons are in rural areas that could really use the economic boost of some government purchases. The neighbors will understand the difference between tax money going to an out of state corporation and tax money going to Farmer Johnson's vegetable farm.

A Buy Locally law could get fresh vegetables to the inmates.
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Old 02-20-2018, 05:17 AM
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nice article it was good and informative
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Old 03-13-2018, 12:32 PM
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Thank you for posting the article. I personally have quite strong (and perhaps controversial) thoughts on the low standard of food served in our prisons and believe it had a very negative effect on my daughters health when she was incarcerated for 14 months.

My daughter suffers from Bipolar disorder (manic-depression), and unfortunately one of her many symptoms manifests in eating disorders. During her time in state jail I regularly raised my concerns that she lost a dangerous amount of weight due to the fact the she was refusing to eat because she had strong reservations about the quality of food she was being given. I was always simply told that they could not give her special treatment, even though I wasn’t asking for her to be given special treatment. In the end my daughter fainted while in jail (I actually wrote about it here in a panic when it happened), and had to be treated in hospital. The worst part is that she concussed herself when she fainted and also split her head open, which are both bad injuries.

When my daughter was finally released she was in terrible physical health and was extremely skinny. It took a big effort on my part of help her regain a regular and healthy eating pattern and regain most of the weight she had lost during her imprisonment. I am convinced that the poor quality of the food in her institution lead to her fainting, and I have read similar articles about the detrimental health effects it has on inmates in prisons here. Thanks again for posting the link.
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Old 03-13-2018, 12:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minor activist View Post
Public health is a real issue. What happens when the inmates get out? Nobody wins by adding sick people to the free world population.

That angle might be a political loser. Here's something else to think about.
Policymakers don't seem to value the health of free people and inmates are viewed as less deserving than that.

I love the idea of creating a financial incentive to using local. The only caveat is we're then tying yet another livelihood to the profitability of mass incarceration. But they have to eat, so why not explore it. Perhaps with regs in place to keep complete dependency on the prison contract from happening.

I live in an ag community with a prison, I don't know how much goes to the facility. But my husband is housed in an ag community in another state and he rarely sees fresh produce. I haven't specifically read up on locavore, but if it's anything like using the 100 mile rule of thumb, it's a reasonable goal for a good portion of our country.

Sidenote: my mom was watching an older documentary on San Quentin in California (2003?) and in the same breath they said "...the prison holds an average of 6,000 inmates [...] ...the three kitchens are responsible for producing an average of 9,000 meals a day".
6,000 inmates...9,000 meals a day. That math doesn't add up unless the bulk are eating only once a day.

Last edited by miamac; 03-13-2018 at 12:47 PM..
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Old 03-14-2018, 05:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minor activist View Post
Public health is a real issue. What happens when the inmates get out? Nobody wins by adding sick people to the free world population.

That angle might be a political loser. Here's something else to think about.

Prison Voice Washington if I understand right has been pushing it from another angle. It's an angle that might get attention in the Carolinas.

If you've run into the word "locavore" already, you already know what this is going to be about.

Every bit of food in a can from a central depot is something that a local farmer did not get to sell to the prison.

The prisons are in rural areas that could really use the economic boost of some government purchases. The neighbors will understand the difference between tax money going to an out of state corporation and tax money going to Farmer Johnson's vegetable farm.

A Buy Locally law could get fresh vegetables to the inmates.
The top 1% who is profiting off of such poor food quality may still end up winning.
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