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  #76  
Old 03-18-2017, 05:33 AM
lareinemoi_3 lareinemoi_3 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fbopnomore View Post
Prison discipline is usually administered in a kangaroo court, so fairness to the inmates is rarely a consideration. I think Jim Croce was singing about prisons "don't spit into the wind or tug on Superman's cape."

In federal prisons, the inmates are marked as "complainers" in their administrative files, which never changes. Tell him to choose his battles carefully.
Thank you for the information I really appreciate it.
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  #77  
Old 03-18-2017, 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by lareinemoi_3 View Post
Hey kind of new here. Wanted to know what can i do in order to help my husband out of SHU being that hes in there for no real reason

I dont know much about that, but I think your best option is to google a lawyer who specializes in "in-prison" criminal law. Most lawyers will offer one free consultation. They will likely have a better idea of your options. Also if the first one you contact is a jerk, call another. I had to do this in a different situation, it sucks, but eventually you will find a decent human who will do their best to advise you on your options.
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  #78  
Old 03-18-2017, 11:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Abi View Post
I dont know much about that, but I think your best option is to google a lawyer who specializes in "in-prison" criminal law. Most lawyers will offer one free consultation. They will likely have a better idea of your options. Also if the first one you contact is a jerk, call another. I had to do this in a different situation, it sucks, but eventually you will find a decent human who will do their best to advise you on your options.
Thank you I will try that and see if someone can help
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  #79  
Old 03-19-2017, 05:20 PM
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I have been dealing with my LO in Seg , he been in there since December , I am just going to continue to battle with the officials , especially as he has paper work to say he is out of seg but waiting on bed space , this has been since Jan , so now its just plain torture. I have been on the phone to the prison and their head quarters for 2 months , each time I do get a lil further but still.....
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  #80  
Old 06-26-2017, 09:55 AM
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Alaska is investigating some reforms, keeping an eye on safety. One is to provide a room designed not to drive humans crazy.

http://www.ktuu.com/content/news/DOC...428538183.html

Here's an example of the kind of thing they might change:
Quote:
"How it is now," said Busby. "An inmate can request segregation, and rather than argue with them, we'll let them go and we won't talk to them again for 30 days. That's when they're due for their next hearing. So we're going to put more checks in the way during the 30 days to get them to come out."
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  #81  
Old 07-20-2017, 10:25 AM
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North Carolina will try shorter sentences to SHU, limiting it to severe and moderate offenses, and requiring mental health to be considered.

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/new...162331683.html

Quote:
Robert Webster, a former state prison captain, said that while he has not yet read the new disciplinary policy, it sounds like a “double-edged sword.”
He’s concerned that the policy may send inmates the message that they will face few consequence if they refuse to obey orders. But he’s pleased that prisoners who break the rules will spend less time in solitary.
“It’s a proven fact that the longer they spend in segregation, the worse they get,” Webster said.
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  #82  
Old 07-29-2017, 02:34 AM
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Well, it sounded like a good idea to let people out for seven hours a day but chained to a desk to keep them from attacking anyone else.

https://www.propublica.org/article/o...causes-trouble

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Young adults began moving into the Enhanced Supervision Housing units in September 2016. Over the following six months, they were involved in six slashings in the units. Nearly 40 percent of all unit inmates suffered some form of injury. Rikers officials have long sought to bring down the number of slashings, fistfights and other violent episodes that plague the facility near daily. Neither the board nor the department provided specific details on how inmates smuggled weapons into the units or broke free of their shackles to harm one another.
I wonder why Colorado had better results.

One conclusion jumps out. Solitary should be reserved for dangerous people and not wasted on people who phone a call-in show, write books, or help other inmates with grievances. I can put a name to each of those.
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  #83  
Old 08-01-2017, 11:08 PM
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https://www.vera.org/projects/reduci...ion/learn-more is an interesting read. It's from people who pass along lessons learned by prison administrators who've safely reduced the use of solitary confinement.

Another one that describes what different facilities have tried and what the results were is at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/11/us...nfinement.html.
Quote:
What was surprising was what happened next. Instead of tightening restrictions further, prison officials loosened them.
They allowed most inmates out of their cells for hours each day. They built a basketball court and a group dining area. They put rehabilitation programs in place and let prisoners work their way to greater privileges.
Continue reading the main story
In response, the inmates became better behaved. Violence went down.
There's more. What it adds up to is, God help the fool who lets a real-life Hannibal Lecter out of his cell without handcuffs, but for most cases prolonged solitary just makes people even harder to manage.
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  #84  
Old 09-02-2017, 02:05 AM
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Here's some more information about Colorado's experiments. The source is biased of course.

Quote:
Colorado has “reclassified” hundreds of individuals out of solitary and into general population, and placed hundreds more in its step-down program. It has also removed from Administrative Segregation people diagnosed with serious mental illness, who traditionally make up a disproportionate number of those in solitary, and placed them in Residential Treatment Programs in separate prisons or units.
Quote:
In our interview, Raemisch asserted that the explosion in the use of solitary reflects an essential error in judgment on the part of corrections departments. Prolonged isolation is “used – and overused – to run a more efficient institution,” he said. “You shut the door on someone who’s creating a problem – end of problem. Or at least that was the thinking at the time. But it didn’t solve the problem. At best it suspended it, and it probably multiplied it.”
He continued, “Running an efficient institution is a noble goal, but we’ve lost sight of our mission. Our mission is community safety – period. And to do that we’ve got to ensure that we’re not putting people out worse than they were when they came in.”
The philosophy remains one of imposing consequences and not just isolating dangerous people.
Quote:
Individuals held in RH Max spend at least 22 hours a day in their cells. They have extremely limited access to televisions, books, phone calls and visits, and are not allowed to purchase food off the canteen
It gets more complicated when the inmates turn down opportunities:
Quote:
In his interview, Raemisch volunteered that the RTPs had experienced significant numbers of prisoners who refused to come out of their cells for either therapy or recreation, especially in the units’ early years. They had the right to refuse and were never forced, he said, but staff worked hard to find ways to engage people and “entice them out of their cells,” including art and other activities tailored to their interests, and the use of therapy dogs.
This high refusal rate, however, has become the focus of criticism leveled by advocates. According to the ACLU, prisoners on the RTPs have reported that many groups “are so poorly run and of so little utility that many prisoners avoid them.” Average refusal rates have actually been worsening over time, exceeding 75 percent between February and April 2015 at San Carlos.
From a long article at https://www.prisonlegalnews.org/news.../opening-door/ based largely on something from a year ago.
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  #85  
Old 09-10-2017, 08:50 PM
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For a look inside the SHU at Maine State Prison SHU and what it does to people check out this youtube video. It's not dramatised like most TV series and is quite point of fact. It's originally from Frontline on PBS.

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  #86  
Old 09-11-2017, 02:41 PM
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That documentary helped me understand the correctional officers' perspective
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  #87  
Old 09-17-2017, 09:27 AM
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The correctional officers perspective is interesting, you're going to try to kill me, we're not gonna let you out. From a family members perspective its a design, eventually you break someone down so you can rebuild them. But even this doesn't happen sometime, sometimes people go mad instead of having their views changed and become more dangerous when you go about trying to put them back out on the street.

Given that the majority of felons will end up back on the street at some point it doesn't make good sense to make them even more dangerous than what they came into the system but it happens.

The recognition that it happens is a good start.
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  #88  
Old 09-20-2017, 06:24 PM
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Meantime some people are working to make solitary confinement more humane without waiting for any policy changes.

It's one of those simple but powerful ideas. They ask inmates what they would like to see in a picture, and take a professional-grade photo to match the inmate's order.

https://qz.com/1076513/photoville-ph...-in-isolation/

(Moderators, I'm not sure where this belongs).
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  #89  
Old 09-22-2017, 07:26 PM
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@Patchouli just linked to an interesting article in the Texas section. The state is (if I read right) abolishing disciplinary segregation. Security-related solitary will continue.
Quote:
Although tough-on-crime supporters of isolated confinement have long contended that it's necessary for prison safety, Lance Lowry, who heads the Texas Correctional Employees union in Huntsville, said the change doesn't pose any major security changes.
http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news...witter-premium
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  #90  
Old 09-24-2017, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by safran View Post
"How about instead of breaking up families and personal relationships, that they foster and encourage them?"


Just who do you think is breaking up families and personal relationships? I think it's the inmates doing this; committing crimes and going to prisons breaks entire lives up. Stop committing crimes. Stop getting arrested. Stop going to prison. Stop blaming others.
Well the reality of the situation is that people make mistakes, and have mental health issues, and engage in bad behavior. lots of people are dealt poor hands
in life and never had a shot or the resources to succeed in their community. Further, should someone suffer their whole life or for years because they made mistakes? Should addicts be locked up for years because they need treatment for addiction? Most of the inmates are not serial killers. Most are human beings, someones child, spouse, sibling.. that needed help on many levels and didn't receive it .. We have responsibility to our children and communities to see that these people receive help/treatment/resources to do better.
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  #91  
Old 09-24-2017, 10:42 PM
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Sometimes people from prison administration will suggest changes based on first-hand observation.

This is from a former associate commissioner who advocates continued use of segregation but knows that it can backfire.
Quote:
David Haley: I think you have to run a safe and secure prison system with all those procedural safeguards. I think you need to have programs including mental health counseling for individuals who are in segregation. If you're not giving them the opportunity to partake in educational programs or drug and alcohol programs or counseling services then you're doing that individual a disservice and we've seen historically what happens is, you open up the cell door and the inmate doesn't walk out — the inmate comes flying out, and he or she wants to hurt whoever happens to be standing on the other side of that door, particularly if they've been in solitary in segregation for a long period of time.
http://www.wbur.org/news/2017/09/11/...ry-confinement
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  #92  
Old 09-26-2017, 07:22 PM
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This is a video about the psychology of isolation and sensory deprivation. One eye-opening fact is that people will give themselves electrical shocks to fight boredom. Pain is easier to take than nothingness is. Wonder if that explains some of the self-harm that happens in solitary.



The closing section is about the narrator spending 72 hours in a white room with the light always on. Worse than segregation in some ways -- he didn't have the chance to exercise in a cage outside the room, for example.
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  #93  
Old 09-28-2017, 06:13 PM
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i stumbled on this thread- and read comments from the very beginning, and am shocked to see some of the responses. I really am.

The UN has stated " any period longer then 15 days straight in solitary confinement is "torture"
DR. Stuart Grassian, Psychiatrist, a DOJ expert on Solitary has agreed. This is not an opinion, this is plain fact.

The WI DOC has been successfully sued 2x over its use of both solitary and admin confinement. The 1st was a class action suit against a super-max that resulted in the supreme court ruling the use of the "supermax" was cruel and inhumane- the inmates were sent to state psych hospitals to decompress and learn to return to GP. That class action suit was filed by an Investigative Journalism Group.
Solitary is now supposed to be used for rule violations only, and the max time allowed per violation has been changed,( 2016) the inmates Mental Health status is required to be reviewed w/in 24 hours of the inmates placement in RH ( restrictive housing) and the psychology dept is supposed to provide input into the length of stay for inmates w the highest MH levels. A 2nd lawsuit was filed in early 2017, by a prison reform group as inmates werent told of the changes, and were accepting punishments that were longer then the max allowed. This lawsuit again was won, and now all inmates going to RH are given a copy of the max time allowed immediately. This doesnt count for the time of an investigation, or while waiting for their ticket. AC ( admin conf) is the solitary w an indefinite length of stay. There has not been any type of "step system" to get out of this. you do, or you dont. A 3rd lawsuit was just filed by a prison psychologist who witnessed prison officials changing inmates MH levels, so they could be placed in AC vs. RH. A 3rd prison reform group joined by local lawmakers has presented legislation regarding a true decrease of solitary time ( instead of what was put on paper and not really followed) -and they haul around a box that is 6foot2 wide and 12 feet long ( the size of a solitary cell in WI) to events, encouraging ppl to go inside, expeirence the typical noise, and have signs flashed that show what a person goes thru- from the panic, anxiety, depression, hopelessness, social atrophy and finally social death.
I am not here to argue that " they deserve it, they cant be w other people" - just making a point that sometimes, according to the researchers, being in solitary for even a minor amt of time, can lead someone to becoming more violent, socially inept and socially dead.
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Old 09-28-2017, 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Minor activist View Post
This is a video about the psychology of isolation and sensory deprivation. One eye-opening fact is that people will give themselves electrical shocks to fight boredom. Pain is easier to take than nothingness is. Wonder if that explains some of the self-harm that happens in solitary.



The closing section is about the narrator spending 72 hours in a white room with the light always on. Worse than segregation in some ways -- he didn't have the chance to exercise in a cage outside the room, for example.
Thanks for sharing this info.
There are so many suicide attempts and ppl develop serious MH issues , like self-mutilation, OCD, paranoia and hallucinations- therefore developing a dx of schizophrenia.
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  #95  
Old 10-13-2017, 11:31 PM
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Raemisch takes an attitude of looking at what actually happens. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/12/o...ison.html?_r=0
Quote:
Not everyone agreed with my new policy. But the corrections officers who had initially opposed it changed their minds after they began to see positive results.
He also mentions the issue of people being released direct to the street from solitary.
Quote:
My staff relayed stories to me that were simply unbelievable. I was told of instances where two corrections officers would remove an inmate from solitary after years of involuntary isolation. Then they would place him on a city bus, remove the cuffs and shackles from his arms and legs, and leave him on his own. How did we ever accept this as good practice? Would you want to live next to one of those former inmates? I surely wouldn’t.
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  #96  
Old 10-15-2017, 12:42 PM
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There is a lot going on in this area in Canada as well. The federal system has dramatically reduced seg, though still under pressure to do so even more. There are also a couple of court cases seeking to declare seg a violation of natural justice and Canadian's Charter rights (our equivalent to the US bill of rights). Tons of media about seg, virtually all of it negative. So some things are happening.
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  #97  
Old 10-19-2017, 08:52 PM
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New York mandates four hours a day outside the cell for inmates in segregation.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/poli...icle-1.3569679

I don't know how the logistics of that could work.

Quote:
Among the new rule changes, anyone locked up in solitary must be given at least four hours a day outside the cell unless there is a written determination doing so would jeopardize security.
Jails will also have to report to the state any decision where a prisoner is given solitary confinement for more than a month and also when someone under the age of 18 is placed in solitary.
The locally run jails must also report to the state within 24 hours any time “essential services” for an inmate are restricted or denied.
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  #98  
Old 10-20-2017, 04:24 PM
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MA lawmakers are thinking about new rules. https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/20...Q6I/story.html
Quote:
The Senate’s wide-ranging bill includes provisions that would mandate prisoners committed to that unit as punishment get a hearing every six months and be released to the general prison population unless they’re judged to still pose “an unacceptable risk” to other people. Currently, such reviews are not mandated by law and reassessments happen less frequently.
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Old 11-18-2017, 08:14 PM
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Here's an interesting one. One juvenile system greatly reduced the use of solitary while increasing accountability.

Quote:
That story revealed that, since 2016, Harrisburg staff have sought more criminal charges for youth assaulting staff than employees at the state’s four other juvenile facilities combined. The underlying incidents may have previously landed youths in solitary or earned them lesser discipline.
Instead, almost a dozen young men from Harrisburg are staring down adult prison sentences.
Prior to that, it was a long way from being about protecting staff and inmates from the worst of the worst:
Quote:
“I've spoken to youth who have been in confinement for 30 days, two months by themselves, for very, very trivial offenses,” Miller said. “It wasn’t just affecting a subset of youth. I can’t overstate the severity of what punitive solitary confinement was doing.”
https://www.propublica.org/article/i...ry-confinement
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