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  #1  
Old 09-17-2015, 07:47 AM
xojennyxo xojennyxo is offline
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Default Any suggestions on How to Educate my PO about my mental illness?

I met with my therapist (and meet with her weekly) and she feels that my PO shouldn't be concerned with my mental health problems in the way she is. My therapist thinks she's overstepping her boundaries since my mental illness and relapse of self injury isn't breaking the law and I'm doing everything I need to - going to therapy weekly, taking my medications daily, meeting with other providers and groups..

My therapist said that relapses happen and what matters is that I am back on track and that I made it over a year without a relapse is huge she says. It's the 2nd longest time I made it without a relapse in a long time since I was basically in a slump for 3 years or so.. I was charged in May of 2012 and then I tried to end my life 5 times.. was in residential treatment 3 times (voluntarily) - 12 months total, the hospital several times, etc.

My therapist says that my PO is not an expert at mental health and I should educate her and tell her that my self injury isn't what she feels. My PO stated she thinks my self injury relapse was for attention.. I did self injure in the past for attention but where I self injured this time wasn't for attention and it never was.. It has to do with past sexual abuse trauma which is something I am working on in therapy.

I want to educate my probation officer and tell her how I feel.. My therapist thinks she's over stepping her boundaries by trying to tell me how to handle mental health and what I should and shouldn't do.. What bothered me is that she thought that 60 weeks of therapy should have done something for me.. that I should "know better".. I have been in therapy since I was 12. Living with mental illness is a life long struggle for me and I probably will always live with it. I mean, I was awarded SSI/SSDI.. I'm not proud to say I get help from the government but I'm not able to work full time or else I'd be neglecting my mental health and wouldn't be able to go to appointments and groups.. so I am self employed.. I pet sit/house sit for partial income.

Anyways, any suggestions as to what I can do/say to my probation officer without feeling like I'm undermining her authority? I don't want to get sent away for offending her. My therapist said I'm not breaking the law by what I did and I have a right to advocate for myself. She feels this situation is something I can learn from - how to stand up for myself..

I got along pretty well with my probation officer and I guess now I feel she views me in a different light because I slipped.. I have never done drugs and I don't drink. I know my PO works with all types of people but she even told me that I'm not the typical person she works with and that she can't wrap her head around my felonies since I don't fit what she read.. I made a mistake and to be honest I needed to hit rock bottom to where I am today.. The legal charges led to me losing my job... a serious suicide attempt which caused me to get treatment which is something I needed all along..

Now I'm living day to day and doing better than I have in a long time.. I found a place to live where my roommate doesn't care that I'm a felon.. I live in a nice middle class neighborhood.. I do community service at the humane society and at NAMI every week.. The judge only gave me 7 days in jail and 28 days of house arrest (7 days per month.. my last month is in October) and I guess most people with what I have.. 5 felonies.. would have gotten prison time or long term jail. I didn't get prison and only got a short time in jail (was long enough for me.. being isolated for 16 hours a day was torture.. being alone with my thoughts was awful.)

anyways.. Thanks for reading if you got this far. any suggestions/advice would be appreciated.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:20 AM
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Conflicts with POs often turn out badly for the people being supervised. You could consider telling your PO that your MH Therapist has a different opinion about your behavior, and suggest that the two of them discuss it.

My opinion is that your PO will not be happy to be accused of "overstepping", by anyone who is not a PO, so that might make your situation worse, not better. As long as you are being supervised, your PO makes the rules, and enforces them, so if you can accept the current conditions, it might be better if you go along with them.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:53 AM
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Thanks for the input.. I probably won't say anything..

my therapist will be upset. she already was yesterday when I said I didn't want to advocate for myself because my po is an authority figure and she wouldn't like me trying to undermine her.. she said I should still do it because I have a right to advocate for myself. :/ kind of frustrating when my therapist is encouraging me to do one thing and I'm "going against" her advice..
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:59 AM
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your PO may not be an expert on your particular mental illness (but trust me, s/he has plenty of experience with Cluster B personality disorders, including BPD).

Your therapist is not an expert on parole or probation.

You have specific obligations for parole/probation that include how to handle relapses. you failed to keep up your end of the bargain. You need to understand this - it's a matter of you meeting the conditions of your parole/probation.

Here's a related example you might be able to understand: An alcoholic busted for DUI has as a probation condition "no drinking or alcohol use". We all know that alcoholics take 8-9 attempts to get sober - relapse is common among alcoholics. The alcoholic then drinks, pops positive on his/her UA. You bet that the PO is going to seriously consider revocation for that relapse, just like your PO is hot and bothered about your SI.

Now, if the alcoholic called his PO BEFORE he drank and said, "PO, I'm having a hard time with my cravings. I need help. AA is not doing it for me, I need rehab." The PO in that case would have been very impressed with this alcoholic and helped the alcoholic find a rehab. Similarly, you could have called your PO before you engaged in SI, when you were having trouble with the impulses (a month, month and a half ago, when you were here, complaining that you were having these difficulties, and everybody was advising you get your ass to a hospital? when you disregarded that advice and decided to SI instead - yeah, that would be the time) and dealt with those impulses differently. You didn't. Like the alcoholic, you engaged in behavior based on the relapse that you agreed you wouldn't engage in. You demonstrated that you're still not identifying the problematic thoughts and the problematic actions that will lead to further offenses, just as drinking is a precursor to an alcoholic committing other offenses - DUI, public intox, domestic violence, etc, etc.

You need to realize your therapist's job is very different from your PO's job. Yes, your therapist can turn you in to your PO for failing to engage in treatment (your question a month/month and a half ago). Your PO can revoke you based on your CONDUCT resulting from your relapse, and how you handle your relapse.

YOU need to realize the difference between their jobs, why you're in trouble with the PO, that this trouble is very valid, that your therapist's interpretation is irrelevant when it comes to anything outside of therapy, and that you really need to work on mending your relationship with your PO.

You won't bother. You'll be here next week, complaining about the same thing. In a few weeks, your PO will be back to where s/he was at your first post - absolutely fabulous, with your therapist as the big meany.

You've got a long way to go.
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Old 09-18-2015, 06:06 AM
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if I did violate probation wouldn't my probation officer of told me that and tell me if I'm going to prison?

I'm on my last week of house arrest in October and she gave me permission to go to a mental health conference via NAMI on October 2nd..
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Old 09-18-2015, 11:26 AM
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you really think that POs are so black and white that they violate every single person for every single thing?

You are pushing your PO towards violation. The more you push, the sooner you violate.

Ah, you get to leave the jurisdiction. Obviously, the PO is now becoming a "good guy". Bet I'm taking the role of the "bad guy" as you're still pretty "rah-rah" about your therapist atm (until she again tells you that she can send you to prison, or whatever your original complaint about her was).

You have a long way to go until you're no longer a danger to society because of your mental illness.
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Old 09-18-2015, 11:34 AM
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I'm sorry you think I'm a danger to society. I'm not a danger to society. What I was convicted of happened over 6 years ago. I just was charged and convicted a few years later..

But, I guess there's no use in trying to prove myself.. People will think what they do. I'm a good person and if I was really a danger to society wouldn't I have gotten jail time instead of house arrest.. I'm also trusted in people's homes with their animals.. They also give me the keys to their homes to hold on to.. I also was accepted into the home of a really nice lady who knows about my felonies and is a good judge of character. I rent her lower level.

I guess it hurts when people make the assumption I'm a danger to society.. I suppose if professionals and the law thought I was they would take action but they know I'm not. Sorry you feel differently..
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Old 09-18-2015, 01:01 PM
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Look, at this point, if the PO was going to violate you, I think she would have violated you by now. In spite of your therapist telling you to advocate for yourself with the PO, personally, I think you should just toe the line right now and do what you need to do to keep under the radar of the PO. It's really just that simple. I think that by trying to explain your illness to the PO would only aggravate the situation and annoy the PO.

You don't have to prove yourself to anybody. I know that you think "yourself" is being harsh on you, but she is really only trying to get you to think. Just keep doing what you need to do to take care of you and your parole obligations, and you should be all right.
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Old 09-18-2015, 01:19 PM
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I not only agree with Life, but I basically have already told you the same thing. Right now, as important as your mental health is, following the instructions of the PO are very important too.

I think the PO and the therapist do have your best interest at heart, but as I've said - I don't think the therapist grasps just how vital it is you follow the rules, keep doing all you can to not cause any harm to anybody and to not rock the legal boat.

As you're portraying things - the therapist seems to feel that your mental health woes gives you some leeway when obeying probation. It does not. You might have mental health problems, but you're not incompetent and therefore are expected to, and you're capable of - following probation rules EXACTLY like you need to.

The PO isn't the bad guy. Yourself isn't the bad guy. In fact, as you've related things there are NO bad guys.
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Old 09-18-2015, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xojennyxo View Post
I'm sorry you think I'm a danger to society. I'm not a danger to society. What I was convicted of happened over 6 years ago. I just was charged and convicted a few years later..

But, I guess there's no use in trying to prove myself.. People will think what they do. I'm a good person and if I was really a danger to society wouldn't I have gotten jail time instead of house arrest.. I'm also trusted in people's homes with their animals.. They also give me the keys to their homes to hold on to.. I also was accepted into the home of a really nice lady who knows about my felonies and is a good judge of character. I rent her lower level.

I guess it hurts when people make the assumption I'm a danger to society.. I suppose if professionals and the law thought I was they would take action but they know I'm not. Sorry you feel differently..
You're like an alcoholic who's all pissed off that your PO's threatening to violate you for pissing hot on a UA - your mental illness does not excuse your behavior. Your behavior is what caused you to obtain so many felonies and the mental health components of your probation/parole requirements. Until you recognize that you actually need to do something different, even when relapsing, you are a danger as you are actively walking down the path towards the same type of offenses that got you into your current position.

Until you understand this, you're not going to understand the differences between your obligations to your PO, and why your PO would be concerned with your behaviors, and your therapist.

In the criminal justice system, nobody really gives a shit that you're a Cluster B at this point. What they care about is how you behave. If you cannot contain and control your behavior and expect to be "excused" for acting on your behavior, you can expect to be locked up. Maybe not this time, but you're far closer to being revoked now than before you engaged in knowing and willful SI. Same as an alcoholic who chooses to drink while on probation/parole - it's a direct violation of your conditions demonstrating your unwillingness to control and contain your behaviors. In other words, you're not effectively dealing with your mental illness and choosing to break your probation/parole conditions, just like an alcoholic who finds him/herself in the same position.

Quit expecting your behavior to be excused - you agreed to contain and control your behavior. If you can't do it, the criminal justice system will do it for you. Next time you feel like cutting, go to a hospital. Demonstrate your ability and maturity to deal with your response to your mental illness.
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Old 09-20-2015, 08:04 PM
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As a therapist who has sometimes worked with clients who were on probation, I know that we therapists must tread lightly when advocating for our client. I don't think it is appropriate, as others have said, for you to try to "educate" your P.O., even though I can understand why your therapist may not see your SI (cutting?) the same as your P.O. does. We therapists do need to respect the P.O.'s authority over our clients. Sometimes, it has been useful for me to talk with a P.O. to find out how open he or she is, when I want to advocate for a client. But that would be the therapist's job, not yours. I agree with everyone here that your main concern should be following whatever your P.O. is asking you to do. If your therapist has a different point of view, I believe she could call the P.O. to express her point of view. Good luck!
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Old 09-23-2015, 01:59 PM
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Firstly congratulations on making it so long without a relapse! Iím sure it is a big achievement, and something that you a rightly proud of and happy with.

Iím not going to try and give you advice about how best to deal with you Probation Officer. The other people posting here know far more about the justice system and being on parole than I do, and you should follow their advice. It is not worth risking offending your PO when you are so close to the end of your house arrest and doing so well.

However, you say yourself that youíre worried that youíll risk getting jail time if you offend her. I understand this is tough for you and you are handling yourself well, but you need to think long and hard about the consequences of violating your probation. You say that 7 days in jail was torture, so imagine what it would be like if you ended up having to stay there for months or even a year. Similarly to you, my daughter also lives with mental health problems (she was diagnosed with Bipolar disorder as a teen). She was recently charged and found guilty of a crime while having a manic episode and is currently serving a year in jail for her actions. Trust me Ė she is utterly miserable and hates her situation. She gets very little treatment for her illness, and has to cope the best she can. Jail does not sound like a fun place to be regardless of your mental health, and you do not want to go back. Iím sure you donít need me to tell you that.

Honey, I know it sucks that you feel you are being punished for having a mental illness, but the most important thing is to concentrate on dealing with your situation the best you can (I know you are trying), staying healthy, and staying out of trouble. Wishing you the best, and let us know how things turn out. Please ask if you have any more questions.
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Old 03-11-2017, 08:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xojennyxo View Post
Thanks for the input.. I probably won't say anything..

my therapist will be upset. she already was yesterday when I said I didn't want to advocate for myself because my po is an authority figure and she wouldn't like me trying to undermine her.. she said I should still do it because I have a right to advocate for myself. :/ kind of frustrating when my therapist is encouraging me to do one thing and I'm "going against" her advice..
Your therapist has good intentions but doesn't seem to understand the pervasive power PO 's have over people. And PO certainly aren't mental health professionals. Probably the least you have to divulge to PO and be honest is the best route. Their ignorance will only hurt you and being totally transparent with them sometimes is not in your own best interest. Learning boundaries with what you divulge is as important as advocating for yourself, too. The person to be transparent with is your therapist who should be helping you, not placing you in a position to further incriminate yourself with people with limited insight and knowledge into mental health issues and risk to society.

Last edited by saviornomore; 03-11-2017 at 09:04 PM..
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Old 03-11-2017, 08:57 PM
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you really think that POs are so black and white that they violate every single person for every single thing?

You are pushing your PO towards violation. The more you push, the sooner you violate.

Ah, you get to leave the jurisdiction. Obviously, the PO is now becoming a "good guy". Bet I'm taking the role of the "bad guy" as you're still pretty "rah-rah" about your therapist atm (until she again tells you that she can send you to prison, or whatever your original complaint about her was).

You have a long way to go until you're no longer a danger to society because of your mental illness.
You my friend have an ignorant and uninformed view of mental health issues and their danger to society. In fact, most of the violent crimes are not committed by people with mental health issues. The biggest risk of people with mental health issues is harm to themselves - not others. It is people like you that promulgate the ignorance and scorn of people with mental health issues bring to society. Educate yourself before you make uninformed statements such as this or stay off of this forum, please. Those types of comments only show your lack of insight and further stigmatize people.
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Old 03-11-2017, 09:01 PM
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Quote:
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You're like an alcoholic who's all pissed off that your PO's threatening to violate you for pissing hot on a UA - your mental illness does not excuse your behavior. Your behavior is what caused you to obtain so many felonies and the mental health components of your probation/parole requirements. Until you recognize that you actually need to do something different, even when relapsing, you are a danger as you are actively walking down the path towards the same type of offenses that got you into your current position.

Until you understand this, you're not going to understand the differences between your obligations to your PO, and why your PO would be concerned with your behaviors, and your therapist.

In the criminal justice system, nobody really gives a shit that you're a Cluster B at this point. What they care about is how you behave. If you cannot contain and control your behavior and expect to be "excused" for acting on your behavior, you can expect to be locked up. Maybe not this time, but you're far closer to being revoked now than before you engaged in knowing and willful SI. Same as an alcoholic who chooses to drink while on probation/parole - it's a direct violation of your conditions demonstrating your unwillingness to control and contain your behaviors. In other words, you're not effectively dealing with your mental illness and choosing to break your probation/parole conditions, just like an alcoholic who finds him/herself in the same position.

Quit expecting your behavior to be excused - you agreed to contain and control your behavior. If you can't do it, the criminal justice system will do it for you. Next time you feel like cutting, go to a hospital. Demonstrate your ability and maturity to deal with your response to your mental illness.
Cutting is not a violation of the law in any state of this land. Inform yourself before you show your lack of understanding. No injury is perpetrated on others by this behavior. Please just stay off with your inflammatory and rude comments.
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Old 03-11-2017, 09:14 PM
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"Cutting is not a violation of the law in any state of this land."

Perhaps not, but it is a violation of her probation.
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Old 03-11-2017, 09:20 PM
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Default update.

Wow. This post is old! Just saw that I got a reply.

I am doing very well now. I got a new therapist after that last one.. Then she left. Then another one and she also left and I started with a new one recently.

I got a new po over a year ago too. My old one went to parole cases..

I will be going to the lowest level of probation and considering my crime was in 2009 I may get off probation early. For community service I volunteer at the humane society, NAMI and I work with three older women who have mental illness. I am fortunate they took me despite my felonies. When I finish my hours the work with the three women will be something I am paid for.

I got jaw surgery a year ago which changed my life completely.

I hope to one day get my felonies expunged so I can get a job as a mental health worker.
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Old 03-11-2017, 09:22 PM
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I also have a successful pet sitting business. I pet and house sit for people. Life is good!
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Old 03-11-2017, 09:29 PM
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Very glad to hear you're doing well and I hope things will work out that you can continue into the career of your choice.

Keep up the good work!
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Old 03-12-2017, 08:20 AM
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Cutting is not a violation of the law in any state of this land. Inform yourself before you show your lack of understanding. No injury is perpetrated on others by this behavior. Please just stay off with your inflammatory and rude comments.
thread is from 2015. If you want to know about the author of that thread, you should look up the other threads she started. You want to know about me, look up all the threads I've started and the responses I've made (there are more than 10K). I'm fairly well respected here. I'm also very well respected in several courts that deal with mental health issues.

Fwiw, cutting as it's related to BPD is frequently treated as an addiction issue, at least until the behavior can get under control. Marsha Linehan, MD (or however she spells her name) may have created a substitution method for cutting that is quite effective, but it still treats the actual act of cutting as akin to addiction (mostly based on the endorphins released by injury, though there are other addiction based hypotheses out there that may or may not fit particular needs). I am well within the literature to assert cutting as akin to addiction.

You really need to check yourself, especially when you don't understand the context of what was written.

OP - so nice to hear from you again. I'm glad everything is going well for you. Are you sure you need to get expunged to become a mental health worker? Most licensing boards are a lot more flexible than that - get the education credentials, make a statement that shows that you've left your bad ways behind, that you've learned from those bad ways, and that as a result, you are better able to connect with those in crisis, and you can usually get a license (unless, of course, you're talking an MD as that usually requires getting a DEA number which is very problematic for felons). Talk with a MN lawyer specializing in licensing - a consult shouldn't be cost prohibitive - and find out whether it's easier to go for an expungement first, or a license. You could treat one as a warm-up for the other. Again, glad everything is going well for you.
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Old 03-14-2017, 11:41 PM
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thread is from 2015. If you want to know about the author of that thread, you should look up the other threads she started. You want to know about me, look up all the threads I've started and the responses I've made (there are more than 10K). I'm fairly well respected here. I'm also very well respected in several courts that deal with mental health issues.

Fwiw, cutting as it's related to BPD is frequently treated as an addiction issue, at least until the behavior can get under control. Marsha Linehan, MD (or however she spells her name) may have created a substitution method for cutting that is quite effective, but it still treats the actual act of cutting as akin to addiction (mostly based on the endorphins released by injury, though there are other addiction based hypotheses out there that may or may not fit particular needs). I am well within the literature to assert cutting as akin to addiction.

You really need to check yourself, especially when you don't understand the context of what was written.

OP - so nice to hear from you again. I'm glad everything is going well for you. Are you sure you need to get expunged to become a mental health worker? Most licensing boards are a lot more flexible than that - get the education credentials, make a statement that shows that you've left your bad ways behind, that you've learned from those bad ways, and that as a result, you are better able to connect with those in crisis, and you can usually get a license (unless, of course, you're talking an MD as that usually requires getting a DEA number which is very problematic for felons). Talk with a MN lawyer specializing in licensing - a consult shouldn't be cost prohibitive - and find out whether it's easier to go for an expungement first, or a license. You could treat one as a warm-up for the other. Again, glad everything is going well for you.
After I posted I realized it was 2015 and probably shouldn't have said anything. Being in the medical field, however, I think making generalized statements about people with psychiatric disorders as a threat to the public is very inflammatory as was addressed at the last American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry that was held in 2016. If cutting can be seen as a parole violation because it is an addictive process, this can be a very slippery slope. Overeating is an addiction - will this be interpreted as a relapse into a substance abuse disorder and then be called a parole violation? Since you seem very learned in this issue as far as addiction and legal issues go, you can understand my reasoning. Overeating doesn't cause any harm to anyone else and neither does cutting.

I just came to this website to get some information to help navigate my autistic son through the prison system in Texas. I have attended many years of annual meetings of psychiatric conferences and everything I have ever read shows that people with mental illness aren't inherently more dangerous to the public, however, this view still exists and obviously our public policy and judicial system is based on an alternate view. I don't have to know the background of anyone to dispute their erroneous views or check myself.
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Old 03-15-2017, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by saviornomore View Post
After I posted I realized it was 2015 and probably shouldn't have said anything. Being in the medical field, however, I think making generalized statements about people with psychiatric disorders as a threat to the public is very inflammatory as was addressed at the last American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry that was held in 2016. If cutting can be seen as a parole violation because it is an addictive process, this can be a very slippery slope. Overeating is an addiction - will this be interpreted as a relapse into a substance abuse disorder and then be called a parole violation? Since you seem very learned in this issue as far as addiction and legal issues go, you can understand my reasoning. Overeating doesn't cause any harm to anyone else and neither does cutting.

I just came to this website to get some information to help navigate my autistic son through the prison system in Texas. I have attended many years of annual meetings of psychiatric conferences and everything I have ever read shows that people with mental illness aren't inherently more dangerous to the public, however, this view still exists and obviously our public policy and judicial system is based on an alternate view. I don't have to know the background of anyone to dispute their erroneous views or check myself.
I understand now - cutting and self harm, while the neon light that jumps shrinks to the BPD dx for women is also found in people with autism. It is a completely different beast in people with autism.

What you are failing to understand with this thread is that the cycle of offense that led to the OP's crime included cutting. As a result, cutting was determined to be a PV as it was an integral part of her not utilizing the resources around her when she was on her way to crisis and stopping the crisis without committing fairly serious crimes.

Most autistic people do not commit crimes because they are autistic (well, with the exception of simple assault, usually a misdemeanor that gets thrown out when there's a prove-up of the dx - people who can't stand being touched can act a bit violent when some idiot insists on touching them, for some autistic people). Autism may be a contributing factor, but it's not the cause - as opposed to say a florid schizophrenic who murders his neighbor because god told him to - that's mental illness as cause for crime. BPDs, as Axis II mental disorders, are not seen in the same way by the courts as Axis I disorders. The subtlety of the causal relationship between the personality disorder and crime is not very well understood, even among mental health professionals. They are seen as quite capable of choosing their conduct, even if it is colored by the mental illness.

Marsha comes into play with cutting and self harm behaviors (burning, hitting, etc) with the exact same substitution method that AA uses with maladaptive behaviors. Note, outside the realm of Cluster B's, SI may be anything other but maladaptive - so people with PTSD and the like may be engaging in SI to avoid suicide, making it adaptive. Marsha uses rubber band snapping and line drawing on skin as substitutes for the action, and contact with therapists and increased sessions (kinda like going to meetings) to avert crisis.

What you are not getting in this instant case is that the OP committed some fairly serious crimes while ignoring all medical advice about her mental illness. This wasn't her first time. As a result, those indices that her mental illness was not under control became PVs the same way, "no alcohol" becomes a PV for somebody who beat the shit out of his spouse while inebriated - drinking may be legal, but not for somebody on parole whose crime involved drinking. Same with legal, adult porn for sex offenders - they can be restricted from viewing, possessing, or even using a computer. Heck, with sex offenders, parole can restrict dating, living with children (a universal restriction even when the criminal conduct did not involve children and involved geese instead)

Now, assuming you haven't had the luxury of having a LO on parole, or dealt with the parole system (as is obvious when you think that a person on parole can do anything that any other legal adult can do), you will find out that parole is not freedom. Freedom occurs the day you get off parole - that is the day you're not accountable to anybody but yourself and the same laws of the land as any other free adult. Parole means you are living under the auspices of the criminal justice system outside of prison. Parole can tell you where to live (halfway house, can't live too close to your victim, whatever), who you can live with (no gang members, no other offenders, cannot live with your victim or victim's family even if that family is also yours, etc), what you must do (get a job within x number of days, enroll in school, therapy, group therapy all of which you pay for, etc), what you cannot do (drink, use drugs, be around those who do, use a computer, drive a car, etc) - basically, what they told you to do in prison they can tell you to do or not do out of prison. Mom might be able to feed her offender and give him sheets that don't scratch, but she can't serve him wine with dinner as if he drinks it, he will be in violation of the conditions of his parole.

Now, what you also need to realize is that parole is there to help offenders successfully make it through parole. They aren't looking to send everybody back the moment that they can. They also have a lot of leeway in adding conditions to parole specific to the parolee. That is what happened in the OP's case. Cutting is specific to her cycle of offending. As a result, cutting became a PV.

Quote:
Being in the medical field, however, I think making generalized statements about people with psychiatric disorders as a threat to the public is very inflammatory as was addressed at the last American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry that was held in 2016.
If you haven't noticed, this site is about people who have committed crimes. Crimes are actions by the individual or group of individuals antithetical to the community as a whole. Frequently, they include acts of violence. Now, you might want to get off your high horse and realize that mental health where it intersects with the criminal justice system is largely about those individuals who, because of their mental illness, commit crimes. It is true in the OP's case, or did you bother to read any of her other threads? The OP isn't a child or adolescent, and wasn't at the time of her crime - BPD is not an illness of children or adolescence (though it can be diagnosed in late adolescence), involved a victim who experienced very disruptive actions on the part of the OP over a period of time (stalking and threats I believe, maybe property damage. But I haven't looked at the OP's previous posts lately - this is just memory. Apologies, OP, if I'm wrong). In short, these are not generalized statements about mental illness - this is shit that is aimed specifically at the OP after I, and others on PRISON Talk Online had been dealing with her in something growing towards crisis for a few weeks.

And, let me ask you - as a medical professional, and since you want to destigmatize mental illness, would you tell such a person to go ahead and cut? Isn't that just the stupidest thing you can do knowing that it's a PV? "Oh, honey, cutting is your right, ignore your parole conditions, ignore your cycle of violence, and go ahead an cut" - wow.

Yes, the vast majority of people with mental illness will never offend. However, you can't deal with the Jared Loughners of the world without knowing that mental illness does in fact play a huge role in the crimes of some with mental illness. This is not stigma - it's simple fact.

And, when you can find me a case (not the Twinkie case from the '70's - everybody knows that's a joke) where overeating resulted in criminal charges, we can equate addictive overeating with cutting as an integral part of an offender's cycle of violence.
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Old 03-15-2017, 11:27 AM
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I usually frown a bit when old threads get accidentally bumped back to life, but in this case, I'm very glad to see it! Thanks for coming back and giving us an update. It sounds like you are really on track. Congrats to you!!

And on the topic of bumping old threads... Soon we'll have a feature added that will state when threads are over a year or two of age, and if a member wants to reply, they'll have to tick a box that they realize it is an old thread before submitting their reply. I realize it is easy to miss the date, and once one person bumps it, most don't look further up to see.

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I am doing very well now. I got a new therapist after that last one.. Then she left. Then another one and she also left and I started with a new one recently.

I got a new po over a year ago too. My old one went to parole cases..

I will be going to the lowest level of probation and considering my crime was in 2009 I may get off probation early. For community service I volunteer at the humane society, NAMI and I work with three older women who have mental illness. I am fortunate they took me despite my felonies. When I finish my hours the work with the three women will be something I am paid for.

I got jaw surgery a year ago which changed my life completely.

I hope to one day get my felonies expunged so I can get a job as a mental health worker.
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