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Oklahoma General Prison Talk, News, Introductions & Chit Chat Topics & Discussions relating to Prison & the Criminal Justice System in Oklahoma that do not fit into any other Oklahoma sub-forum category. Please feel free to also introduce yourself to other members in the state and talk about whatever topics come to mind that may not have anything to do with prison.

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  #1  
Old 01-13-2015, 06:34 PM
ForeverYourz ForeverYourz is offline
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Unhappy Help!!! Im breaking down- no more parole in Oklahoma??

Hi everyone i got a call from my hubby earlier all down cuz he said that his case person went to talk to them and told everybody that they were not gonna have anymore parole and they were gonna have to max out their sentence is this true.....im so upset because i thought that they cant do that can they
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  #2  
Old 01-13-2015, 09:31 PM
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As far as I can tell, yes there is still parole in Oklahoma:


a Eligibility

Offenders become eligible for parole at various stages of their incarceration depending upon the statute they were convicted under. See Title 57 O.S. Section 332.7 for more information on parole eligibility.
A. For a crime committed prior to July 1, 1998, any person in the custody of the Department of Corrections shall be eligible for consideration for parole at the earliest of the following dates: (see the link below)

B. For a crime committed on or after July 1, 1998, any person in the custody of the Department of Corrections shall be eligible for consideration for parole who has completed serving one-third (1/3) of the sentence; provided, however, no inmate serving a sentence of life imprisonment without parole shall be eligible to be considered for parole pursuant to this subsection.

http://www.ok.gov/ppb/Parole_Process...ity/index.html
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:46 AM
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Just hang in there, it seems the Gov. has promised LOL to do something about the prison's Lets all hope and PRAY this happens. DON'T Lose HOPE NOW! HOLD ON HONEY, it's always a wild ride, Loves and hugs to ya
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Old 01-14-2015, 07:03 AM
rewdiazepam rewdiazepam is offline
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I am from Oklahoma.

I am a guy who was in the Oklahoma prison system for almost a decade a few years back on a false conviction of rape of a minor. I know quite a bit about the DOC and the prison system in Oklahoma.

They are not going to abolish parole. I don't know what the case manager was referring to, but they still have parole in this state.

In the late 1990's the legislature enacted a form of "Truth in Sentencing" which made about 20 or so crimes---mostly violent---crimes in which an individual must serve 85% of his time before coming up for parole. The rest of the inmates are still under the old good days credit guidelines.

They have parole, but Mary Fallin does not have a good record for signing them, which she must do before an inmate actually is given parole. Oklahoma is one of the few states which require the governor's signature after the parole board has approved an inmate for parole before parole is given.

Supposedly, there is supposed to be corrections reform this legislative session, but don't hold your breath. You are in Oklahoma, a Conservative Bible Belt state that believes being "tough on crime" instead of "smart on crime" the road they want to take.

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Old 01-14-2015, 07:02 PM
CenTexLyn CenTexLyn is offline
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While there is no express right to a release to parole supervision, the reality is that there is a protected interest where it existed at the time of sentencing. Attempts to change release structures are rarely applied in a retroactive manner for precisely that reason which is also why there are, by example, people in federal prison who are still eligible for parole even though the BOP has effectively done away with parole.

So, even if a statutory change was made that did away with discretionary parole releases, it could not be applied retroactively without opening the floodgates of appellate activity seeking to overturn plea agreements.
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Old 01-14-2015, 07:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForeverYourz View Post
Hi everyone i got a call from my hubby earlier all down cuz he said that his case person went to talk to them and told everybody that they were not gonna have anymore parole and they were gonna have to max out their sentence is this true.....im so upset because i thought that they cant do that can they
I'm pretty sure they can't do that and why would they want to with the prisons being so overcrowded and the amount of money it takes to house just one inmate. Unless inmates are sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole, I'm sure it's a misunderstanding. Hang in there sweetie
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Old 01-14-2015, 09:44 PM
ForeverYourz ForeverYourz is offline
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Well he is not serving life he comes up for parole in 2021 he was tellin me that he will explain to me better when he gets the information because i know he has to do his 85% but they cant keep him any longer right
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Old 01-15-2015, 10:34 AM
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Right! Between good time and they'll probably come up with another name for the same thing but don't worry, he'll be home soon.
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Old 01-20-2015, 06:26 AM
mssirois2u mssirois2u is offline
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http://nationinside.org/campaign/okl...ison-crowding/

This just came out about our 85% guys and gals, we all need to help any way we can, I not sure where to start, but Im sure someone will come along and start tell me where to start at! To help push this!
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Old 08-18-2017, 07:29 PM
hankrearden2000 hankrearden2000 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rewdiazepam View Post
I am from Oklahoma.

I am a guy who was in the Oklahoma prison system for almost a decade a few years back on a false conviction of rape of a minor. I know quite a bit about the DOC and the prison system in Oklahoma.

They are not going to abolish parole. I don't know what the case manager was referring to, but they still have parole in this state.

In the late 1990's the legislature enacted a form of "Truth in Sentencing" which made about 20 or so crimes---mostly violent---crimes in which an individual must serve 85% of his time before coming up for parole. The rest of the inmates are still under the old good days credit guidelines.

They have parole, but Mary Fallin does not have a good record for signing them, which she must do before an inmate actually is given parole. Oklahoma is one of the few states which require the governor's signature after the parole board has approved an inmate for parole before parole is given.

Supposedly, there is supposed to be corrections reform this legislative session, but don't hold your breath. You are in Oklahoma, a Conservative Bible Belt state that believes being "tough on crime" instead of "smart on crime" the road they want to take.

rewdiazepam
In the early 1990s Oklahoma DOC had an early release mechanism that bypassed the Governor. It was called Pre-Parole Conditional Release... and functioned the same was as parole. Released inmates were supervised by the same probation & parole officers who supervised probationers & parolees. Essentially, it provided a safety valve without putting the Governor on the spot politically.

rewdiazepam, I have a question for you. Due to the nature of your conviction, how difficult was it to deal with the other inmates? I worked for 24 years in the federal prison system and child sex offenders had to lockup in protective custody or face assault once they were discovered. Later the BOP began to designate certain prisons to house sex offenders exclusively due to enough of them entering the system to make it possible. And, guess what happened. The sex offenders began to form gangs in their sex offender prisons and exploit each other just like the rest of the inmates did.
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Old 10-10-2017, 01:52 AM
rewdiazepam rewdiazepam is offline
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Hankreardon2000,

I was sent to Dick Conners in Hominy, which was known as Gladiator School within the Oklahoma system. There are a LOT of really violent and bad inmates housed there. Many of the inmates had life sentences and/or sentences of 100 years or more. Oklahoma went crazy on their sentencing, as one of my tutor friends received a 30,000 year sentence on a sex offense.

Here is how I survived. I made up a cover story until I could win the respect of the other inmates. I certainly was not going to go into a place like DCCC and tell the other inmates I was found guilty of raping a child, even though I was innocent. I figured the cover story would buy me some time to win some respect from the other inmates, and it did.

I minded my own business, worked as a tutor, was respectful to all inmates, and kept out of the way of the troublemakers. After a while, I had built up a lot of respect from the other inmates and I was known as an OK guy, so I had no problems whatsoever. A few years after later, it leaked out about my offense, but by that time, nobody really cared since they respected me and did not think I was guilty. I had been on the same cell block forever and was more of less a fixture. I had helped a lot of guys with their GED, had helped them with their legal cases, and had built up a lot of goodwill. So the charges were never a problem.

But back then---in the 1990’s---a cover story worked much better than it would today. With no internet and no ability to Google someone’s name, the cover story was intact.

But I was also blessed and lucky. I was a good athlete, but I know if the inmates wanted, they could have made it very difficult for me.

The Oklahoma system is pretty damn tough, particularly the medium security prisons. I do think the key is to keep the charges a secret until you can build up some good will and respect from the other inmates. The other key is to keep a low profile without appearing that you are hiding something or are afraid. RESPECT is also an important key.

I think I contributed so much in helping the other inmates that they liked me.

I do know that if a child sex offender goes into a medium security prison and lets the inmates know about his crime that he will be run off the yard, threatened, or attacked. I now currently do work in prison reform, support for sex offenders and their families, and occasionally for The Innocence Project.

When I was in prison, they did not designate certain prisons in Oklahoma as sex offender prison, although many of the sex offenders were housed at Joseph Harp, which is where the SOTP was located. The sex offender population was spread out equally to all the facilities. Dick Conner at Hominy and OSR at Granite were the roughest places to serve time, with Joseph Harp being the easiest.

I saw a lot of sex offenders get beaten up, but part of the reason is that some sex offenders act weird and just downright creepy. There were stabbings, mop handles crashing into heads, the lock in the sock routine, and metal shanks----and the inmates there were not afraid to use these weapons. I had a cell mate who was stabbed 17 times in the chest, puncturing a lung, and left for dead. What did you do wrong?? He would not pay back his poker debt. What was the nature of the debt?? A forty cent bag of Ramen Noodles. They play for keeps there.

Back then, there were also not as many sex offenders in prison as there are today. There was no internet, so there were no child pornography crimes or solicitation crimes. These two types of sex offenses are filling up both our state and federal facilities. But, ironically, having a higher sex offender population probably makes it safer for a sex offender to serve his sentence.

But very few sex offenders, unless he can carry himself well, will do well at a medium security prison. The inmates at higher security prisons have long sentences and very little incentive to follow the rules, so they have no problem knocking a sex offender in the head with the old lock in a sock routine. Most of the older inmates also do not want a sex offender living in their neighborhood, so they run him off the yard.

To answer your other question, Joseph Harp in Lexington was the Cadillac prison of the prison system. At one time they had a warden, Jack Cowley, who was very progressive and allowed the inmates a lot of privileges that other inmates in Oklahoma did not have. He allowed the Honor Dorm there to order out on one Friday of every month, so they had pizza then. Harp also had the best canteen of all the prisons as they had a nice selection. Being the yard that housed the sex offenders that were enrolled in the SOTP, the yard was safer. Cowley let it be known to the other inmates if they so much looked cross-eyed at one of the sex offenders, he would have them shipped to the only maximum yard in Oklahoma----Big Mac in McAlester. I think Harp was better since many of the rules Jack Cowley instituted were retained after he left.

rewdiazepam
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