Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > FOR "OFFENDERS" > Straight Talk
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Straight Talk The general Ex-Offender discussion forum. If you have done time, this forum is for you.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-26-2016, 07:55 PM
bigpappy bigpappy is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Alabama, USA
Posts: 143
Thanks: 14
Thanked 157 Times in 76 Posts
Default First World Problems

Eventually, hopefully - you're out. If you're a loved one - I encourage you to learn from my mistake.

In order to buy a house, or finance a car - if you lack the resources to pay cash, you will have to finance the purchase.

To finance a purchase, particularly a house, you'll likely need a credit score - and the better that score is, the better.

In my case, I was in for a finance related crime - bank fraud. I was not allowed to apply for any credit when I was on probation.

After probation - and I mean the first day, I knew that the more credit I had, the better my score could be, provided I didn't forget to pay the bills!

I was foolish. I didn't research credit cards enough. I applied at my bank, and got a measly $1000 limit. Not bad for a first card - but my second card was a Discover - and they gave me $10300! - which only made me feel foolish for applying at my local bank.


To make a long story short, since my father was military, I applied for a credit card at USAA - and was approved for $11k.

Soon, I applied for a Chase card, 4k.


I was paying these off every month - I still am.

But - this weekend - USAA closed my account, without warning. They claimed they were closing my accounts due to "moral turpitude".
Chase sent me a letter telling me the same thing - but at least they gave me some notice. USAA just cut my access to my financial information - (auto insurance, IRA, credit card) without warning. Chase used the words, "Reputational Risk".

So - without drawing everyone a picture of credit card profile - I lost $15k of available credit for no other reason than my being an ex-con.


I would encourage all of you - when your loved one gets out, if he/she applies for a credit card, do not apply to Chase or USAA. It can only foul you up on your credit score.

Because I've been out 6 years and a few months, my probation was over 15 months ago. So, now for a very, very long time, I'm going to have a couple of accounts that are about a year old factor into my "average age of accounts" - keeping the number lower than it should be, if I'd never applied to them.

I contacted the CFPB (consumer financial protection bureau) - but I doubt it will do much good.

So, just a little warning. There are plenty of other banks out there. I'd use one of the many.

Also - I have no idea what service they used to determine my record - because it's certainly not on my credit reports.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to bigpappy For This Useful Post:
dtmom2013 (07-28-2016), fbopnomore (07-27-2016)
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-27-2016, 07:08 AM
fbopnomore fbopnomore is online now
Site Moderator

PTO Site Moderator Staff Superstar Winner 

Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 24,570
Thanks: 34,324
Thanked 16,972 Times in 10,250 Posts
Default

USAA will apparently even cancel auto insurance for folks with "moral turpitude", anyone who has a felony conviction. So much for their claims that ex military members, and their families, are welcome "for life".
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-27-2016, 07:35 AM
miamac's Avatar
miamac miamac is online now
Site Moderator Gone Mad

Staff Superstar Winner PTO Site Moderator 

 

Join Date: May 2013
Location: ORnativeAZresCAtied
Posts: 7,994
Thanks: 10,271
Thanked 13,376 Times in 5,183 Posts
Default

Whaaat? That's crazy!

Is it based on the felony alone or the class of felony? Gosh. I never would have thought about that. Thanks for the heads up.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-27-2016, 11:19 AM
Cdub Cdub is offline
Banned
 

Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Georgia, United States
Posts: 520
Thanks: 0
Thanked 348 Times in 194 Posts
Default

I am more surprised you got the credit than I am you lost it. Both lenders took reasonable actions that are in their best interest.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-27-2016, 01:29 PM
prisonlady prisonlady is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Quebec Canada
Posts: 510
Thanks: 2
Thanked 400 Times in 213 Posts
Default

Maybe that would have been the case if they never granted the credit in the first place or if they granted a lower credit limit, perhaps even if they reduced it after the fact. But as it is, they are discriminating outright against a customer who has been paying the bills. Isn't that breach of contract and discrimination?
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to prisonlady For This Useful Post:
OnlyInTexas (03-21-2017)
  #6  
Old 07-27-2016, 01:51 PM
Cdub Cdub is offline
Banned
 

Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Georgia, United States
Posts: 520
Thanks: 0
Thanked 348 Times in 194 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by prisonlady View Post
Maybe that would have been the case if they never granted the credit in the first place or if they granted a lower credit limit, perhaps even if they reduced it after the fact. But as it is, they are discriminating outright against a customer who has been paying the bills. Isn't that breach of contract and discrimination?
Not at all. Lenders may reduce or close revolving credit lines and it says so in the contract if it discovers information that would have led to denial of credit in the first place. Lenders also may cancelo credit if a credit score drops, so these closures, which will reduce OPs credit score, could lead to other accounts being closed.

Lender will have to allow OP to pay down any remaining debt according to contract but the lender is well within legal rights to take the action it did. OP presents as a sophisticated borrower. Surely he was aware of this before taking the credit in the first place.

Last edited by Cdub; 07-27-2016 at 02:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-27-2016, 03:29 PM
prisonlady prisonlady is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Quebec Canada
Posts: 510
Thanks: 2
Thanked 400 Times in 213 Posts
Default

But auto insurance is not credit. On the other hand, it is required by law. Therefore, a customer who pays and does not cause any problems related to the insurance itself, such as frequent or suspicious claims, should have the right to keep the insurance. By cutting the customer off, the insurance company could be forcing the customer to either break the law, or lose the privilege of driving that should not be up to the insurance company to grant or withdraw.

If enough companies do the same thing, they may end up effectively banning the customer from driving legally. Because the customer will likely find another company, if he does, then it can be argued that he has incurred some kind of loss, such as extra costs and higher rates. Doesn't an insurance contract give more rights to the customer than a mere credit card user's agreement?
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to prisonlady For This Useful Post:
Minor activist (03-21-2017)
  #8  
Old 07-27-2016, 05:54 PM
Nickel Timer's Avatar
Nickel Timer Nickel Timer is offline
Ex-Prisoner & ACLU Intern
Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Idaho, USA
Posts: 1,340
Thanks: 800
Thanked 1,987 Times in 798 Posts
Default

I was never charged with any financial crimes (just grand theft of merchandise that was later "plead down" to burglary) but ended up defaulting on a few credit cards when I fell the second time round.

I had no problem rebuilding my credit using a CapitalOne Secured credit card for a year, before applying for my first unsecured card through Discover. Amazingly, I was approved, even though Discover was one of the cards I had defaulted on 7 years prior. I had no problem obtaining other cards and lines of credit after that.

However, still to this day, the only bank that still blacklists me from any cards or lines of credit (such as through Amazon.com) is CHASE. They're the only one who still gives me trouble, even after all these years. No second chances.

Of course, considering how important having a good credit score is for everything from insurance rates to car/home-loan interest rates to getting approved for rent or utilities in your name without a deposit to even employer background checks these days, there is no way in hell I am ever going to let my credit get ruined again. It just takes too long to repair.

But I am very mindful that it was Discover who gave me the second chance, and CHASE who did not. Apparently they don't want my business, and quite frankly, the feeling is mutual. Plenty of other options out there these days.

I've had no problems with Progressive or State Farm insurance either.
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Nickel Timer For This Useful Post:
LifeTraveler (07-27-2016), miamac (07-27-2016), Minor activist (03-21-2017)
  #9  
Old 07-27-2016, 07:25 PM
Cdub Cdub is offline
Banned
 

Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Georgia, United States
Posts: 520
Thanks: 0
Thanked 348 Times in 194 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by prisonlady View Post
But auto insurance is not credit. On the other hand, it is required by law. Therefore, a customer who pays and does not cause any problems related to the insurance itself, such as frequent or suspicious claims, should have the right to keep the insurance. By cutting the customer off, the insurance company could be forcing the customer to either break the law, or lose the privilege of driving that should not be up to the insurance company to grant or withdraw.

If enough companies do the same thing, they may end up effectively banning the customer from driving legally. Because the customer will likely find another company, if he does, then it can be argued that he has incurred some kind of loss, such as extra costs and higher rates. Doesn't an insurance contract give more rights to the customer than a mere credit card user's agreement?
You have no right to credit or insurance or any other financial product. Once an insurance contract expires then the company is not obligated to renew it. It also may be cancelled for reasons outlined in the policy. It is not the responsibility of the insurance company to do business with people it determines create risk because of actions past or present.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-27-2016, 07:58 PM
prisonlady prisonlady is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Quebec Canada
Posts: 510
Thanks: 2
Thanked 400 Times in 213 Posts
Default

Then maybe people should pressure their legislators to get such rights. If the law requires auto insurance while it is very hard to live without a car and most legitimate employers do not pay cash, then some basic financial products such as auto insurance and bank accounts are a necessity. Alternatively, the society could go back to making auto insurance optional (I myself have managed to avoid it all my life by simply not getting a car and a license) and by making it normal again to get paid in cash. But once a society is making financial services necessary even just to gain access to one's own money, people should have the right to have things like that instead of hoping that the bank won't just cut them off.

Moreover, the bank did not wait for the insurance to expire. It simply cut the customer's access to his financial information. Technically, it even stole the customer's money (from the Individual Retirement Account). If the customer saw or will see that money back, the fact remains that he had entrusted his money to a bank who just kept it and got rid of him. People get incarcerated for misusing funds temporarily all the time. Why can the bank just do it? If the OP was indeed paying his bills so well, he had, in fact, demonstrated that he was honest and paying his bills rather than a particularly high risk. Therefore, potential risk is not an excuse. Anybody else could potentially stop paying or turn dishonest, but he did not. If anything, the bank turned dishonest.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-27-2016, 08:10 PM
Cdub Cdub is offline
Banned
 

Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Georgia, United States
Posts: 520
Thanks: 0
Thanked 348 Times in 194 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by prisonlady View Post
Then maybe people should pressure their legislators to get such rights. If the law requires auto insurance while it is very hard to live without a car and most legitimate employers do not pay cash, then some basic financial products such as auto insurance and bank accounts are a necessity. Alternatively, the society could go back to making auto insurance optional (I myself have managed to avoid it all my life by simply not getting a car and a license) and by making it normal again to get paid in cash. But once a society is making financial services necessary even just to gain access to one's own money, people should have the right to have things like that instead of hoping that the bank won't just cut them off.

Moreover, the bank did not wait for the insurance to expire. It simply cut the customer's access to his financial information. Technically, it even stole the customer's money (from the Individual Retirement Account). If the customer saw or will see that money back, the fact remains that he had entrusted his money to a bank who just kept it and got rid of him. People get incarcerated for misusing funds temporarily all the time. Why can the bank just do it? If the OP was indeed paying his bills so well, he had, in fact, demonstrated that he was honest and paying his bills rather than a particularly high risk. Therefore, potential risk is not an excuse. Anybody else could potentially stop paying or turn dishonest, but he did not. If anything, the bank turned dishonest.
I suppose we will just disagree. I think the bank acted reasonably and I would wager you will not find a court to find they acted illegally.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-27-2016, 08:25 PM
prisonlady prisonlady is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Quebec Canada
Posts: 510
Thanks: 2
Thanked 400 Times in 213 Posts
Default

The bank that basically stole is the one who did not even provide any advance notice (at least the other one did). I understand that it may not be possible to get justice for consumers who are wronged under such circumstances, but it's not fair.

I do realize that when some kind of fraud, such as using somebody else's credit card without permission, is suspected, the bank is perfectly justified in cutting off access to the account immediately, not wait a month or something. That's why the bank will always want to have the right to take such action. However, this is meant to be for protection. It's not fair to use such powers to just get rid of existing customers who have been paying their bills and did not do anything wrong. Now, if it's just that the bank is screening them very thoroughly before they even become customers, that's different, although not always fair, but in this particular case, if the story is true, then the bank has really abused its powers.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-27-2016, 08:36 PM
Cdub Cdub is offline
Banned
 

Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Georgia, United States
Posts: 520
Thanks: 0
Thanked 348 Times in 194 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by prisonlady View Post
The bank that basically stole is the one who did not even provide any advance notice (at least the other one did). I understand that it may not be possible to get justice for consumers who are wronged under such circumstances, but it's not fair.

I do realize that when some kind of fraud, such as using somebody else's credit card without permission, is suspected, the bank is perfectly justified in cutting off access to the account immediately, not wait a month or something. That's why the bank will always want to have the right to take such action. However, this is meant to be for protection. It's not fair to use such powers to just get rid of existing customers who have been paying their bills and did not do anything wrong. Now, if it's just that the bank is screening them very thoroughly before they even become customers, that's different, although not always fair, but in this particular case, if the story is true, then the bank has really abused its powers.
Again I disagree with every point you make. I see nothing unfair about the banks actions.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-27-2016, 08:51 PM
prisonlady prisonlady is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Quebec Canada
Posts: 510
Thanks: 2
Thanked 400 Times in 213 Posts
Default

Let's put it this way. The bank wants to avoid the purely hypothetical problem of some kind of dishonesty from someone who has been honest for some time but who has been convicted in the past. Maybe the risk is low (mind you, the bank does not have to give him too much leeway such as a high credit limit or too much money at the bank machine immediately after he deposits a check) but the bank really wants zero risk, so out he goes!

But why wouldn't consumers similarly want to be protected against the risk that their own money, or at least their access to it, will just disappear, and perhaps they also lose their insurance or other stuff? At least a bank may be able to stop whatever the customer is trying to do. The customer cannot prevent the bank's actions. How would you feel if your own money similarly disappeared tomorrow? We are all at risk. It's just that the bank is less likely to do things like that to most people.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 07-27-2016, 11:17 PM
LifeTraveler's Avatar
LifeTraveler LifeTraveler is offline
Crazy Cajun Super Moderator

PTOQ Editorial Team Member PTO Super Moderator 

Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Louisiana, USA
Posts: 16,255
Thanks: 15,659
Thanked 17,073 Times in 6,823 Posts
Default

Some banks and financial institutions don't have a lot of room to talk about "moral turpitude". It's just another example to me of society in general still trying to punish somebody who is working hard to get their act together.
__________________
Life Traveler
Super Moderator
LASO, Immigration, Drug & Alcohol Treatment & Rehab, Louisiana, Ohio











Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to LifeTraveler For This Useful Post:
miamac (07-27-2016), Nickel Timer (07-28-2016), WeepingWillow (07-28-2016)
  #16  
Old 07-29-2016, 04:16 PM
bigpappy bigpappy is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Alabama, USA
Posts: 143
Thanks: 14
Thanked 157 Times in 76 Posts
Default

Okay folks - there are bound to be different sides to every story.

Almost a week has passed and I've "calmed down".

The truth is - USAA, nor Chase, had a responsibility to provide me with a credit card. I applied and was approved.

Both business have slightly different business models, but the one area they have in common is in managing risk.

I can be forthright here. I was incarcerated for multiple counts of bank fraud. It's amazing I've been able to open a checking and savings account (and have kept them open without incident for over 6 years now without bouncing anything or being anything less than a normal person with a bank account)

But - it seems that USAA may not have cancelled my accounts after all. Thus far, all they have done is restrict my access to their site.

My IRA - I transferred it - so even though I can't see how my mutual funds within my IRA are doing, USAA didn't steal it. They just prevented me from seeing if the value increased, decreased or stayed the same.

My auto insurance is under review. The policy expires in November; Until such time they inform me in writing, I'm covered.

The credit card: They've closed this with a balance remaining - didn't even give me a chance to pay it.

As to whether they broke any laws - that's ...unlikely, because, after all, they're USAA, right? They surely wouldn't do that, would they?

I am not a lawyer. But the FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act) suggests there were definitely better ways to handle this.

https://consumercomplianceoutlook.or...der-ecoa-fcra/

A creditor must provide notice if it has:
Taken adverse action on an existing credit account;

But, they have 30 days to provide this notice; 7 of which are gone.

A creditor must notify the applicant of adverse action within:
30 days after taking action on an existing credit account



I confess that it never occurred to me that once they granted credit they would take it away, provided I was paying on time. I knew that any bank could - but I figured USAA was less likely than any of them to do so.

Ultimately, there may be some recourse for me - but it's too soon to know if it would do me any good to pursue it. I have filed a complaint with the CFPB.

But, emotionally, I've let it go. That's life in the big city.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to bigpappy For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (07-30-2016)
  #17  
Old 07-29-2016, 07:51 PM
Cdub Cdub is offline
Banned
 

Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Georgia, United States
Posts: 520
Thanks: 0
Thanked 348 Times in 194 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpappy View Post
Okay folks - there are bound to be different sides to every story.

Almost a week has passed and I've "calmed down".

The truth is - USAA, nor Chase, had a responsibility to provide me with a credit card. I applied and was approved.

Both business have slightly different business models, but the one area they have in common is in managing risk.

I can be forthright here. I was incarcerated for multiple counts of bank fraud. It's amazing I've been able to open a checking and savings account (and have kept them open without incident for over 6 years now without bouncing anything or being anything less than a normal person with a bank account)

But - it seems that USAA may not have cancelled my accounts after all. Thus far, all they have done is restrict my access to their site.

My IRA - I transferred it - so even though I can't see how my mutual funds within my IRA are doing, USAA didn't steal it. They just prevented me from seeing if the value increased, decreased or stayed the same.

My auto insurance is under review. The policy expires in November; Until such time they inform me in writing, I'm covered.

The credit card: They've closed this with a balance remaining - didn't even give me a chance to pay it.

As to whether they broke any laws - that's ...unlikely, because, after all, they're USAA, right? They surely wouldn't do that, would they?

I am not a lawyer. But the FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act) suggests there were definitely better ways to handle this.

https://consumercomplianceoutlook.or...der-ecoa-fcra/

A creditor must provide notice if it has:
Taken adverse action on an existing credit account;

But, they have 30 days to provide this notice; 7 of which are gone.

A creditor must notify the applicant of adverse action within:
30 days after taking action on an existing credit account



I confess that it never occurred to me that once they granted credit they would take it away, provided I was paying on time. I knew that any bank could - but I figured USAA was less likely than any of them to do so.

Ultimately, there may be some recourse for me - but it's too soon to know if it would do me any good to pursue it. I have filed a complaint with the CFPB.

But, emotionally, I've let it go. That's life in the big city.
Adverse action in that context means reporting your account as delinquent to one or more of the credit reporting agencies.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07-30-2016, 07:40 PM
bigpappy bigpappy is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Alabama, USA
Posts: 143
Thanks: 14
Thanked 157 Times in 76 Posts
Default

My understanding is that it means that they can reject your credit app - but they've got to tell you why. They can close your account -- really for whatever reason they want - but they have to say why. But, I'm no attorney. It's just the way I interpreted the words in the FCRA. Maybe I'm wrong. <shrug>
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-21-2017, 12:05 AM
ttexrbomb ttexrbomb is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 70
Thanks: 0
Thanked 58 Times in 30 Posts
Default

Well USAA went off the deep end with me. While I was on my six month vacation, they closed all my accounts. And let me say, they got down and dirty in the process.

They closed all my checking, savings, loan and insurance accounts. I had over $50k in credit lines as well as high balances in my deposit accounts. They called my wife one evening and let her know the accounts were closed. They didn't tell her why, only that they did an investigation and decided they no longer wanted to do business with me.

That is fine with me. There are other banks that have since welcomed my business.

Now here is where they get dirty..

1). They turned off my online account access. I have loans with them, but no way to access the payment history online. They will not allow me to view any accounts online.
2) They will not provide me with any account numbers, only the last four of the account numbers to make payments on. This has resulted in numerous payments getting "lost" in the mail, despite memo's being on the check stating '13593443 acct ending in 1234'. They are making it very difficult to make payments.
3). In December, they took five payments over the phone, but did not apply them to the loans. It took my wife (and mother) two weeks, speaking to multiple different departments and faxing multiple documents to them proving they took the payment. Finally after getting their general counsel involved, the December issue was fixed.
4). This happened again in January.
5). They cancelled an auto warranty product which I purchased and refunded the money. I normally wouldn't have an issue with this, except they refunded 50% of the premium paid, citing they were issuing a prorated refund. The car was under a manufacturer warranty and still is. The coverage was purchased to take over once the new car hit 36k miles, which it has not as of yet. Their own contract states they will issue a full refund if they are the ones who initiate the cancellation. They did not do that in this case.
6). They have marked three of my loan payments currently 90 days past due, despite them receiving payments but not applying them to the loan. They fixed the payment application, but never corrected the credit reporting. When disputing the credit report, they verify the information is accurate.
7). I asked for copies of my bank statements. Since there are several years worth, I asked them to restore the access for 24 hours so I can download them. They said 'No'... They said I would have to pay for them at a cost of $10 per statement. So, with all our accounts, this would be outrageously expensive. My wife and I have sole accounts, one joint account. Our children had a savings account (and I have five children). So, my cost would have been $8640 for my records going back to 2009. Don't take my word for it, those were Jeffrey Regge's numbers. So I guess I don't need them that bad, though they would have been nice to have in case any issues come up in the future where I need to prove a payment was made...

And when I spoke to somebody on their CEO team by the name of Jeffrey Regge, he basically said they owe me no explanation and said they would do nothing to help me. Those were his words.

So, USAA may be good, but if they catch you in their moral turpitude clause, they become vindictive and flat out unprofessional.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-05-2017, 11:03 AM
bigpappy bigpappy is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Alabama, USA
Posts: 143
Thanks: 14
Thanked 157 Times in 76 Posts
Default

Well, I am sorry to see that USAA impacted someone else so negatively.

I confess, I don't check in here as often as I used to. Aside from the incidents with USAA and Chase, my conviction has been more of an asset than a negative.

I tell people what I've done so they know how far I've come. Most find it encouraging that despite the many flaws in our country, people can still work hard and make a life.

But, yeah, I sure would like to discuss with the bigshots at USAA why they didn't just say, "Hey, we're firing you and here's why: blah, blah."
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to bigpappy For This Useful Post:
fbopnomore (04-05-2017)
  #21  
Old 04-05-2017, 09:17 PM
prisonlady prisonlady is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Quebec Canada
Posts: 510
Thanks: 2
Thanked 400 Times in 213 Posts
Default

At the beginning, I was puzzled why the bank would basically persecute a random client with a proven history of reliability just because he happens to have a felony on his record. It started to make more sense once you mentioned that your conviction was for bank fraud.

That being said, if your description of the situation is accurate, the bank may still have acted unfairly if not even illegally or at least in breach of contract and/or in violation of their own rules. Lines of credit are basically money you don't have and that you can borrow, so it's not surprising they would cut you off (I'm not saying that this is fair to you). However, if you really had large account balances containing your own money (i.e. really your own, not borrowed) and made payments on time that were not applied to the balance due, the bank may indeed have been in the wrong, perhaps even stealing your money, sort of, and/or setting you up for financial failure and poor credit scores that you don't deserve. At the very least, it would be morally wrong.

Of course, if "your" money is/was borrowed money, there may still be something wrong with what the bank did and it may still be unfair after such a long time, but I can see how they may have felt they needed to protect themselves.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First world problems MrsCetina PTO Lounge 1 04-30-2012 04:57 PM
What do you think are some of the biggest problems in the world today? tchavon1984 PTO Lounge 25 07-11-2011 03:16 PM
2010 World Cup! SPAIN Won the World Cup J&D7 PTO Lounge 53 07-11-2010 05:05 PM
Intro - crystal84 - Ohio crystal84 Ohio General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat 3 01-26-2010 09:58 PM
hes leaving this world and going into the world he lives in dolphina Husbands & Boyfriends in Prison 13 03-09-2005 05:08 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:51 PM.
Copyright © 2001- 2017 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics