Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > SHARING EXPERIENCES > It's Not All Bad Behind the Walls
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

It's Not All Bad Behind the Walls Let's talk about the good things that happen in prison. The correctional officers that have helped us, etc.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #76  
Old 06-30-2006, 09:38 PM
Melissa_2006's Avatar
Melissa_2006 Melissa_2006 is offline
Faithfully waiting
Donation Award 
 

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 4,392
Thanks: 377
Thanked 289 Times in 265 Posts
Default

I pray daily that there are good CO's where my fiance is located. I quess it takes a real man not to get the (big head) that Ive experienced dealing with all of this. It's really bad when you are treated as a convict and all you are doing is trying to stand by your loved one.
__________________
















Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #77  
Old 07-02-2006, 11:28 PM
shell444 shell444 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: tennessee
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

As a C.O., I must say, that the hardest time for me is when I work chow hall and see all the men, young and old, of all races together, waisting year after year, in the prison system. I just want to stand up and ask them what the hell are they thinking and imagine how much they could be capable of doing in society, for the good.
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 07-03-2006, 03:19 PM
starting over starting over is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: WI, USA
Posts: 208
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

I cannot agree with this post any more. It is a waste to spend one's life doing things to be involved in the system. One tip to those "complaining" about "bad" CO's. Don't do anything in your life, or you have your loved ones do anything, to ever have to deal with a CO and then you will not have to complain about it. I know it sounds so obvious but that is really as simple as it can be.
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 09-06-2006, 09:42 PM
Texasfem's Avatar
Texasfem Texasfem is offline
Registered User
Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 2,932
Thanks: 113
Thanked 349 Times in 150 Posts
Default

I will say that I finally met a CO even before my son has made it to prison. This CO lives right next door to me and I never knew what she did. she talks about the same things that are mentioned here. she is a great lady with a Job that she hates especially the role she must play while at work.
They are tough, mean and heartless but what I have learned by just talking to her this weekend, not all CO'S are bad just trying to do their jobs. imagine the emtional roller coaster some must go through when watching those who are heartbroken and away from their loved ones or those who left children behind to serve their time. yes of course, I can't say all CO'S are this way but you know, there are co's who are loving and caring and CO'S who are real a$$ es because they think the title makes them tough. theythink they can treat another humam being in a bad way regardless of what they did or what crimes they have committed which I do not agree with. think about this for one monment, these people who treat our loved ones with abuse and hate live a very lonely and hateful life on the outside is why they take it out on others. what goes around comes around. their day will come and those who are kind will always be treated with kindness.
__________________
Wishing my PTO Friends a Happy Easter!
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 09-09-2006, 10:33 PM
kc's mom's Avatar
kc's mom kc's mom is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: michigan usa
Posts: 93
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I too know that there are some co's that are human and treat our loved ones well. My son told me that some of them are truly good people and even wanted him to contact them when he got out, but something stopped him from doing that, he still thought that maybe they weren't for real for some reason
Reply With Quote
  #81  
Old 09-11-2006, 06:34 AM
angelica916's Avatar
angelica916 angelica916 is offline
FREE TO BE ME
 

Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: CALIFORNIA
Posts: 2,069
Thanks: 0
Thanked 28 Times in 10 Posts
Default

Speechless.
__________________
A lie told often enough becomes the truth.

Lenin
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 09-27-2006, 10:11 AM
lil_Linds lil_Linds is offline
y0u think y0u know....
 

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

LuLu,

Well i can say that you are one of the few officers that probaly actually care. When I was 17 I got locked up for something my ex boyfriend had done and I got the blame of it. When i got sent to the womens prison alot of the officers gave me alot of problems because I was a wealthy child from the suburbs of Ann Arbor. They would say I was a spoiled brat and could of had anything i wanted but i chose to come to prison. I didn't choose to come to that place. They would treat me like i was the lowest of lowest. When really I had never been introuble until then.... Anyways im talking in circles. I just wanted to tell you that im sure the male prisoners enjoy you'r kindness. I can tell you that it means alot to them.


Lindsey
__________________
I may be young.. but i've been to hell and back.. nothing scarys me anymore.
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 09-27-2006, 03:38 PM
Aymeesmama04 Aymeesmama04 is offline
Danielle
 

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Oklahoma U.S.A.
Posts: 38
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wink Compassionate CO's

I have worked that side of the fence. I understand what this CO is talking about. I will say this, as a former CO - I was compassionate, I felt for the inmates, but by not being mean and angry towards them all the time, the facility walked me. If you're not tough towards the inmates, it's automatically assumed you are a currupt cop, bringing in dope, sleeping with the inmates, ect. It's a sad deal. I know many CO's that care, but most are afraid to show that... it's a job, a career. I pray for the inmates every day - that they come in contact with at least one compassionate CO that can put a smile on their face, or let them know someone cares. We, CO's, are not here to judge or punish - they have already been judged, and there punishment is being sent to prison - it's already been done. We're there to protect them, the outside, and ourselves. Too bad not ALL CO's thought that way!
__________________
4 months and Some change left 'til my man comes home...
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 09-28-2006, 07:01 AM
kimberstone kimberstone is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: canton ohio
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

my husband is in madison correctional institution in ohio and he has had some real winner co's but he says that for the most part, most are nice. one won't let them go to church thought, isn't rehabilation and correctional, chuch would help rehabilitate them but he refuses to let him go. then when I visit, one co is extremely nice to me, my husband and out 7 yr old son. my son loves him. he jokes with him and makes it a little better place to visit him. he's(co)going to retire and i'll say that i'll miss him a lot... some are human, some are not, i completely agree.... I guess they have a job to do and being nice to inmates may not be part of there job description.......
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 11-13-2006, 10:22 AM
Baby_Blue's Avatar
Baby_Blue Baby_Blue is offline
Formerly Ray's Angel
 

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Chickamauga,Ga
Posts: 567
Thanks: 2
Thanked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Default

I realize that the OP was posted almost 4 years ago but I must say I was moved by it. I am a former CO and the compassion that I had for the inmates where I worked would have costed me my job. I did in fact fall in love with an inmate and I would not change that for anything in the world. I do know that where I worked there were few CO's that had any heart and I hated that. If you treat these guys like animals that is exactly how they will act. They are human and should be treated as such. Our job as a CO was not to punish the inmates but to make sure that they follow the rules. There punishment is being there. Stripped of their freedom. I really commend this officer that wrote this letter for having the courage to admit that he sees inmates as human beings.
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 11-13-2006, 12:18 PM
mrstiny0121's Avatar
mrstiny0121 mrstiny0121 is offline
devoted wife
 

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 134
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Being in prison before, I can say there are some CO's that do care. More than I would of thought. But there are always those a**holes that treat you less than human.
__________________
:love:Loving My Man Forever!:love:
Mrs. Tiny

Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 11-13-2006, 12:27 PM
femeniem's Avatar
femeniem femeniem is offline
waiting, wishing
 

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: oregon usa
Posts: 85
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

nice letter sad though thank you for posting it.
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 11-15-2006, 07:38 PM
pmitch10's Avatar
pmitch10 pmitch10 is offline
Registered User
Donation Award 
 

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NH, USA
Posts: 2,479
Thanks: 794
Thanked 662 Times in 455 Posts
Default

Thank you Lulu for sharing that. What a compassionate CO. We need more of those around........Godly compassion mixed with wisdom.
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old 11-16-2006, 09:40 PM
JAM29 JAM29 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: WI USA
Posts: 321
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default reply

i agree. i also agree what the one lady wrote about her being a co and the inmates because its true. as a former inmate it was nice to have nice male and female cos. it makes your time go better.
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old 11-24-2006, 05:43 AM
mlouj mlouj is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: New Philadelphia, OH USA
Posts: 17
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

May god richly bless this Co...Proverbs 22:7 is my favorite Bible scripture also
Reply With Quote
  #91  
Old 01-10-2007, 07:28 PM
Brandons-Mom Brandons-Mom is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Montana, USA
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

lulu, that letter really touched my heart. I have a young son in prison ..will be there for many years. I have met a few guards like this one, and at the prison where my son is at , they usually are always pretty cool with me..and when i talk to my son, He rarely complaines about them. I will take that as Gods blessing to the situation. And for that ..and those who have earned the praise and gratitude, i feel blessed.
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 01-11-2007, 08:04 AM
lulu's Avatar
lulu lulu is offline
Been here forever
 

Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Tx.
Posts: 9,966
Thanks: 76
Thanked 326 Times in 52 Posts
Default

Bless u and your family hun hugggggggggggggggs,
__________________
many hugs
lulu
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 01-11-2007, 08:15 AM
lulu's Avatar
lulu lulu is offline
Been here forever
 

Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Tx.
Posts: 9,966
Thanks: 76
Thanked 326 Times in 52 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lil_Linds
LuLu,

Well i can say that you are one of the few officers that probaly actually care. When I was 17 I got locked up for something my ex boyfriend had done and I got the blame of it. When i got sent to the womens prison alot of the officers gave me alot of problems because I was a wealthy child from the suburbs of Ann Arbor. They would say I was a spoiled brat and could of had anything i wanted but i chose to come to prison. I didn't choose to come to that place. They would treat me like i was the lowest of lowest. When really I had never been introuble until then.... Anyways im talking in circles. I just wanted to tell you that im sure the male prisoners enjoy you'r kindness. I can tell you that it means alot to them.


Lindsey

Im not a co hun. A co wrote this and i just past is around
__________________
many hugs
lulu
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 01-15-2007, 03:11 PM
Unbroken's Avatar
Unbroken Unbroken is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: East Texas
Posts: 1,185
Thanks: 85
Thanked 324 Times in 127 Posts
Default

I think it very important that we each put ourselves in the position of the CO at work, and I must disagree with the previous statement that for all CO's, the job is a "choice", many CO's in my area are CO's because it's the only opportunity available in the small rural areas where texas builds it's prison units. In fact, I had friends all through my life that have worked as guards, being's that my family is from one of the isolated areas. So, that being said, here's my take on it.

Guard Mentality | Justified?
I've made several comments concerning "guard mentality" in other posts, specifically a post about how to survive in prison and remain "unbroken". In that post I made the statement that I took a "military discipline" approach when interacting with the guards. My approach of course, was one of perhaps a new military recruit in bootcamp answering to a drill sargeant.
I took this approach as a means for survival, much as I think a guard takes the approach of a military drill sargeant for interacting with inmates, as a means of survival.
Are there corrupt guards? Absolutely, just as there are corrupt people in all walks of life. It is however my opinion that the majority are not corrupt, merely doing what they feel necessary to ensure their survival. For them, this means being able to leave the job, on the job every day. To go home and be the husband/father that their family deserves. I can certainly understand the need that they feel for remaining in control on the job. After all, they are at risk just as much as anyone else inside the razorwire. Guards have been raped and murdered on the job, so can we really blame them for trying to maintain their psychological advantage through strict discipline and enforcement of the rules? As for those who abuse their position of authority and take part in the use of exessive and/or unecessary force...well, kharma I guess is a good word. What goes around, comes around.
Hate, animosity, resentment, they all eventually affect us negatively and in the end, aren't worth the energy we spend on them. I suppose the bottom line for me is, I harbor none of the above mentioned towards guards in general. Those who deserve forgiveness, should truly be far more worried about their forgiveness with the one that matters, and not be worried about my opinions. For those just doing their jobs, no hard feelings from me.
Just my two cents, anyone got change?
Peace, Dan
__________________
The worst evil is not the crime committed, but the failure to do the good one might have done.
Leon' Bloy
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 01-15-2007, 04:09 PM
bobbi992003 bobbi992003 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: illinois usa
Posts: 420
Thanks: 0
Thanked 13 Times in 4 Posts
Default

This story really touched me. my husband is due out in a little over five years.The facility hes at isnt so bad the cos are usually pretty nice. They do have ruff jobs and sometimes its hard to see that. God bless everyone! LULU thatnks for sharing this with us.
__________________



Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 02-03-2007, 06:53 PM
redrocket1's Avatar
redrocket1 redrocket1 is offline
Waiting for my baby...
 

Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: New York, USA
Posts: 68
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lulu
I was not sure where this goes. Sorry if it is in the wrong place. A freind of mine shared this with a group and i thought i would share it with you.

As I write you, I sit in a tower watching and waiting above one of the largest prisons in the state of Alabama.
As I was sitting, I felt a need to write a letter to tell parents and young adult some of the things that I do and see every day in my chosen profession, as a correctional officer.

I see many sorrows, few real honest smiles and less joy. The sorrows come by many things; one person may have missed an approved visit that he may have worked hard to get. The reason may have been that the inmate broke a rule and the visit was denied or postponed as a punishment, or "his people" didn't come for some reason, or no reason at all.

Many sorrows come by a death in the family or perhaps an illness, and the inmate cannot get in touch with anyone to find out what has happened, or what is being done about the situation. I have heard an inmate not much older than myself, preparing funeral arrangements for one of his parents from prison. I caught myself trying to grasp how he must have felt, and I could not imagine the pain or sorrow. Many times the only thing that they can do is to sit and wait, for hours- sometimes days. I have watched grown men break down and cry from frustration over things you and I don't ever stop to think about, such as a busy signal on a telephone.

Many of us consider no mail as a blessing, sometimes; however, many inmates consider "junk mail" as a blessing because it was sent to them alone. Many receive no mail at all, ever. Some inmates don't know where their family is, or how to contact them, sons, daughters, wives or grandchildren. No one.

Some people will carry a sorrow to their grave, because they will never see "the other side of the fence" as long as they live. Some make the best of the situation. Can you pause for a moment to think what it would be like to never watch TV alone again, or be able to watch what you wanted, or never go fishing or hunting-to hear the sound of the fall leaves rustle under you feet as you walk through the woods with you girl or your wife? If that doesn't shake you, then how about never being able to hold your husband or wife when ever you want to, to pull them close to you and tell them that you love them, never being able to share their company again, or to make love again, as long as you both shall live. You won't be able to enjoy the children as you should, or be able to watch them grow up, to watch him play football, or to watch her go out on her first date, and to wait up until she is safely home. You won't be able to see your grand children grow up, after your children get married, at the wedding you missed, because you were sitting in prison serving a sentence of "life without parole" or will sit somewhere on death row. Where some people fearing, some praying for their time to come, for the execution of their sentence.

Many of us work in a noisy environment-we will stand the pressures and the stresses of the day, to race home for the comfort of our home and to see our wife and children, waiting with open arms to greet us when we arrive.

Imagine living in an environment where the noise seldom stops and the frustrations always runs high and you have very little, in any, choice in what you eat, wear, do or go. You do the same thing day in, and day out, day after day, year after year, with little change. With no one to turn to or no one to lean on, in a place where friends are near non existent and close relationships are even more rare. Debts can cost you all that you have to you name, it can cost you your body, even your life.

My fellow officers and I come to work each day and see the toll it takes on a man to be placed behind a fence and bars, to be stripped of the most private and personal act of being a human being, such as openly caring for someone, or to cry in front of other people, because it may be taken as a weakness. You and I take our freedom for granted. I can promise you that an inmate will treasure the few moments that they get to spend on an eight hour pass with their wife and children. That is the very few inmates that are allowed to take advantage of this privilege.

Many inmates have only a letter or a postcard to hold on to, to keep them going. I have sat for hours and talked with men and their problems, such as their wife has left them, and she has custody of the children, or their parole officer is delaying a parole over a simple matter such as paper work, or a medical examination. Or the officer didn't get to it, he was on two weeks of vacation.

I have sat and looked at pictures of families, a wife, of children and pets and many other things. I have heard stories and the tales about the people in the pictures and have felt compassion for the both of them. I have even cried and prayed for these men when I was alone by my self.

I have often wondered if I had the right to shoot someone that would attempt to escape. With in my reach I have a 12 gage shotgun loaded with .00 buckshot. If the need were to arise that I should have to use it, well, it would certainly maim or kill. I have found an answer. It is in my bible. It tells me that I ma to obey all authority: the State of Alabama is my authority. It tells me that I am to stop an inmate if he attempts to escape, to use the force necessary to accomplish this, which includes deadly force. If it weren't for God's approval the government wouldn't exist.

My job is hard. I must see the sorrows and fears of these men and have compassion as a Christian. As an officer, I must at times do things which seem to show little or no mercy.

Parents and young adults, please listen to what I have to tell you. Teach your children well, to do what is right, teach them how to tell the difference between right and wrong. Teach them that is never too late to come back to our living savior, but most of all teach them how to serve him day to day. Because if you don't, well, I have told you some of the things that I see and witness each day that I walk through a gate , for my Lord and state.

I will leave you with this bible verse; it goes,

Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he shall not depart from it.

Proverbs 22:7



It helps me to hear things like this, only to know that there are ppl who care in there about what these men face from day to day. I am in tears after reading that partially because I miss him so badly and partially because I know that some people will never have the opportunity to be with their loved ones again on the outside. Life really stinks and deals us sh**ty cards sometimes. My heart goes out to everyone here and thank you for this post.
__________________


Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 02-03-2007, 07:37 PM
lilsislovesyou's Avatar
lilsislovesyou lilsislovesyou is offline
Ashley
 

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: West Virginia USA
Posts: 337
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Thank you for posting this!! I have never read it before til now and can not begin to understand how they feel but feel even more compassion for them! The guard is right we do take a lot of things in life for granted and dont realize that in a blink of an eye it could all be taken away but here are men and women who have went with out it for years! It really does make you think hard about your life compared to theirs! And I do feel a little sorry for some of the "good" guards that have such compassion like this man and wonder everyday how they can go through with it! Other guards however need to read this and jump on board!
Thanks again,
Ashley
__________________
Somewhere there's someone who dreams of your smile, and finds in your presence that life is worth while. So when you are lonely, remember it's true somebody somewhere is thinking of you.

Last edited by lilsislovesyou; 02-03-2007 at 07:38 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 02-03-2007, 08:04 PM
MattM MattM is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: TX, Denton
Posts: 19
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

That's a touching read and another perversion of Scripture. While the majority of Christianity feels that killing is forgiveable, it is certainly not necessarily supported.

Last edited by MattM; 02-03-2007 at 08:06 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 02-05-2007, 03:22 PM
JJs_BabyGirl_03's Avatar
JJs_BabyGirl_03 JJs_BabyGirl_03 is offline
Makin it thru life slowly
 

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Bolivar, Missouri
Posts: 226
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

That was a really good letter. and it is good to see that there ares ome that actually care. it was great !!!
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 02-07-2007, 09:39 PM
leila leila is offline
son at srci
 

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: california usa
Posts: 14
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

the letter is well written, and i have found an officer or three in the vistors intake area of an oregon prison, SRCI, that are very warm and do not make you feel that you are at a prison. we are all human and they just seem to know that. respect is respect.....
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wrote my last letter SparklyPink0513 Coming Home 21 04-20-2012 11:02 AM
Letter I wrote to ex-boyfriend in prison who won't leave me alone! *Johnny's Angel* GPT Phones, Mail, and Visitation Discussions 13 08-13-2004 09:58 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:28 AM.
Copyright © 2001- 2017 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics