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Mental Health Pleae use this forum for all mental health related issues dealing with the prison system.

View Poll Results: Was your LO's meds reduced/cut?
Yes 9 81.82%
No 2 18.18%
A bit, but not much 0 0%
Voters: 11. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 06-09-2015, 01:20 PM
PlasticInsanity PlasticInsanity is offline
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Default Were your LO's meds cut or reduced?

A close friend of mine was put into a federal pen in January, and he has a variety of mental health issues which include PTSD, clinical depression, anxiety, among other things. He was on a specific Rx regime before he went in, but then getting in his meds were severely adjusted - most were stopped, one was reduced, and one was changed to another one. I tell him to try stay positive about this.

I'm just wondering if anyone else knows of someone going through this as well?
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Old 06-09-2015, 03:42 PM
fbopnomore fbopnomore is online now
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It is completely up to the medical, or psychology staff at that prison. I was in one federal prison where the PHD in charge thought his mission in life was to get everyone off of all their medications. Luckily for the prisoners, a MD Psychiatrist decided through closed circuit TV interviews. Some prisons have the medical unit prescribe mental health drugs, but it seemed to me that some others left it up to psychology, PHDs or MSWs instead. There are no "second opinions" in the bop, but some members have had limited success after contacting federal cure.
http://www.fedcure.org/index.shtml
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Old 06-09-2015, 07:16 PM
PlasticInsanity PlasticInsanity is offline
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Thanks for the website! I'll check it out.
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Old 06-09-2015, 09:49 PM
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The fact remains that anybody going in who has a psychiatric condition should assume that their meds will be changed according to formulary. And with each change of facility or doc, there will again be another change.

Benzos are out - tapering off benzos before going in is a good thing.

Pain meds beyond Motrin is out - tapering off pain meds learning some meditation and the like is a good thing.

Signing all HIPAA waivers allowing his outside providers to converse with his inside providers is most appropriate, and will help with continuity of care.

If he has to go off a psych drug, and can manage to taper off himself (assuming nobody in the medical profession will help him), look into this: http://willhall.net/comingoffmeds/
Hall's method is the one he's used to take himself off meds, and I've heard from other members of the psych community that it's useful. Further, it's the only thing I know of that actually addresses taking yourself off psych drugs when those around you are fucking around with your drugs.

Sorry your LO is in this position. Might want to help him out with a few DBT workbooks, encourage him to find some "self soothing" activities - coloring books are a hit with a lot of people - stuff like Johanna Basford's books, journaling and the like can help reduce internal pressures. So can keeping a ledger of mood, symptoms, triggers and the like. It's hard being mentally ill in prison. But, if he works at it, takes charge of it, he won't come out worse.
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Old 11-04-2016, 05:04 PM
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They changed all his meds several times including the dosages without ever tapering him. They did not listen to him when he told them what worked in the past. He did refuse thorazine after having horrific side effects and they didn't make him take it. They put a lot of inmates on high dosages of Celexa because it is sexually inhibiting and lowers the numbers of rapes in the prisons. He was at too low dosages for long period of times while the slow process of getting approval within the state took place.
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Old 11-04-2016, 05:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxzi View Post
They changed all his meds several times including the dosages without ever tapering him. They did not listen to him when he told them what worked in the past. He did refuse thorazine after having horrific side effects and they didn't make him take it. They put a lot of inmates on high dosages of Celexa because it is sexually inhibiting and lowers the numbers of rapes in the prisons. He was at too low dosages for long period of times while the slow process of getting approval within the state took place.
All anti-depressants except for Wellbutrin inhibit sex drive.

Is said, they prefer tri-cyclic and earlier meds because they are not as expensive as meds still under patent protection.

Since it would be odd for a person to get into prison or deal with an extended prison sentence without depression, this is one of the most medicated areas of mental health in prison.

There is no relationship between depression based medications and the reduction of rapes in prison. Further, the mentally ill, in particular the depressed, are not apt to rape other prisoners. Passing on this myth does a disservice to those who are depressed, stigmatizes seeking treatment, and reduces treatment compliance by causing those suffering from depression to avoid medication for fear of either being viewed as a rapist, as somebody who engages in sex in prison, or as a signal to parole boards that the individual is on those drugs to prevent rape.

As somebody who also works with those civilly committed for sex offenses, I can tell you that they even prescribe Wellbutrin to the most dangerous sex offenders even though it can increase libido. If they want to reduce rape, there are a lot of other chemicals they can use.

In prison, as out, they have to get a court order to forcibly medicate an individual unwilling to be medicated. They may make life uncomfortable for you if you refuse medication, but they cannot force med anybody without a court order. Further, they are happy to keep the meds it costs less to have a prisoner on nothing than it does to have a prisoner taking meds.
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  #7  
Old 11-04-2016, 05:53 PM
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Wrongly accused again

Last edited by jaxzi; 11-04-2016 at 06:04 PM..
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Old 11-05-2016, 05:12 AM
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The original message was about US federal prisons, so here is that RX formulary.
https://www.bop.gov/resources/pdfs/formulary.pdf

Each prison/jail system will have its own list of approved medications and will decide which ones, if any, to prescribe. If he doesn't receive appropriate treatment, he needs to file a specific, written request to medical, and/or an inmate grievance.
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Old 12-29-2016, 02:18 PM
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Does it help to make sure the PSI report lists what medications are needed and what will happen without them? Or do the medical staff ignore it?
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Old 02-01-2017, 11:58 AM
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From my experience, each facility has its own formulary. They want the prisoner (not patient, prisoner) on the least expensive alternative. Even with a ton of documentation, you get the staff psychiatrist coming in and changing meds in a way I think of as Willy hilly - not enough taper time, no consideration of the prisoners past medication experiences or current level of function, just some shrink coming in and saying that this med here, the one I want to prescribe instead of the expensive one you're on, is win the standard of care. The standard of care is everything, and prisons and prison psychiatrists largely uphold the lowest end of that standard of care with the prisoners paying the price for it. I've seen where prisoners change medications to the preferred drugs of each psychiatrist as the prisoner changes facilities. To me, it is grotesque, but I'm usually not there for medication issues. I do document, should some group come in with an interest at reforming, but how likely is that?

Anyway, the more a patient can advocate for himself, the better, signing HIPAA statements so that the prison doc and your real world doc can communicate can be very helpful if you can advocate. Advocate and document to the best of your ability and hang on - it's going to be a rough ride.
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