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  #1  
Old 11-04-2005, 11:32 AM
Derricks Baby Derricks Baby is offline
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Default Looking for Some Info-coke mental addiction drug and/or a physically addiction

Okay, I'm kinda new at all of this and I just wanted some general info. Before my man got locked up. He was really strung out on cocain, and he knew that he needed help. For two weeks we called every different rehab we could find. They all told us the same thing. They said that coke is a mentally addictive drug not a physically addictive drug. In other words they wouldn't except him. Is that true? I know that he wasn't lying because I had spoke to some of the facilities myself.
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  #2  
Old 11-04-2005, 12:07 PM
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My sister is a recovering Coke-addict. She has been in a few rehaps for different drugs she gotten addicted to. We never were told this when finding her a place to get her in for Coke. Were you calling state rehaps or a private place? This may be the difference.
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  #3  
Old 11-04-2005, 12:16 PM
Derricks Baby Derricks Baby is offline
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I think that it was state rehabs...i'm not too sure. His dad tried to help us.
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Old 11-05-2005, 03:07 AM
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I have never heard of this. That Cocaine is not physically addictive. if that were the case, Cocaine would not be the #1 reason people are being locked up in Tennessee.
http://www.usdoj.gov/ndic/pubs1/1017/cocaine.htm

I cannot believe that when he called he was told he would not be admitted because of his cocaine use. I am not saying you are not telling the truth but whoever told this to you needs not to work in the field of addiction. Because they are misinformed and giving false information. Did he say he wanted residential treatment? You helping him find numbers is one thing but he needs to make the phone calls and follow up on whatever they suggest. He needs to be the one who checks in and maybe if he had gone to detox before this and made calls to treatment centers, he would have had a better chance at getting into one from detox. Try here and call some more treatment centers.

http://theagapecenter.com/Treatment-.../Tennessee.htm

Good luck and welcome to PTO.
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Old 11-05-2005, 07:27 AM
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I belong to several different addiction recovery boards, and unfortunately I have heard of this before. While cocaine/crack is more of a psychological addiction, there is certainly a proven physical change that occurs within the brain. Detox and short-term rehab centers sometimes do not accept cocaine patients because there isn’t as severe a withdrawal involved as those coming off of opiates or alcohol. Therefore, the way around the system is to claim that one is both addicted to alcohol (usually the 2nd drug of choice by cocaine/crack addicts) AND cocaine/crack. Also, with cocaine/crack addiction the lifestyle and associated behaviors become as much of an addiction as the drug itself. Therefore, I strongly recommend at the minimum a 9-12 month inpatient rehab upon his release. Even though he is probably abstinent during his incarceration, he needs the help and support of professionals and other recovering addicts with some depth of sobriety once he is released. Again, I understand that you miss him and want him home right away upon his release, but without the buffer zone between the very structured environment of prison and the streets, many go right back to the drugs upon their release. Not using does NOT equal real recovery.
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Old 11-06-2005, 11:56 AM
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I have also heard that cocaine is not physically addictive. I can tell you from personal experience -- don't believe. It has BOTH a physical and a mental component. Once I started using cocaine, a PHYSICAL craving would develop which was so strong that I could not stop until some outside force brought the spree to an end. This intense craving was something FAR more than a mental obsession. At the same time, when I was not using, I experienced a mental obsession to use.

Also, extended cocaine use has a definite effect on the brain. Cocaine use triggers the hyper-release of neurotransmittors in the brain's "pleasure pathway". After a while, the body compensates by not making/releasing these neurotransmittors as it normally would. The result is that the cocaine addict has a PHYSICAL need for the cocaine to compensate for the brain's decreased functioning. This damage to the neural pathways can take up to one year of abstinence to rebalance.

I think the myth that cocaine is not "physically addictive" comes from the fact that a cocaine addict does not experience the terrible physical withdrawals one sees with opiate addicts and with those who are alcohol dependent. Nevertheless, while it is true that cocaine addiction has a very definite and powerful psychological component (maybe more than any other drug), I also strongly believe that there is a physical component at work. Similar to any other addiction, the features are:

a) A mental obsession to use (psychological);
b) An inability to stop once started (physical).
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Old 12-24-2005, 12:59 PM
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if someone were to go into a residential facility, under the statement that is was for alcohol and was unwilling to admit to the coke issue, would the coke problem likely be brought to light in the context of the treatment?
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Old 12-24-2005, 06:47 PM
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If it was inpatient and they knew what they were doing, it wouldnt take long to know there was another addiction/problem because there are obvious signs of withdrawl that dont exist in alcohol withdrawl. Most councillors/addiction specialists are pretty familiar with addicts hiding other addictions, disorders and diseases.
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Old 12-26-2005, 11:05 PM
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I agree with Witchlin, the thinking and behavior patterns are also different between many substances and alcohol. A good counselor will recognize this and call them out on it.
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Old 12-27-2005, 01:26 PM
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"studies show that cocaine and its derivatives are not physically addictive, prolonged exposure to the drug does create a psychological dependence, especially for intravenous users (Nicholi, 1983). Cravings become so strong they seriously disrupt normal daily living behavior for extended periods of time. In time, the desire for crack can supersede an addict's concern about the care and safety of his or her children (Farrar & Kearns, 1989). "
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Old 12-28-2005, 06:24 PM
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As a substance abuse counselor, I'd like to smack everyone of my peers who claims that coke isn't physically addictive. It impacts both, physical and psychological.

At a recent seminar, a slideshow presentation depicted the changes in the body during and after cocaine use. what the hello is that about? If it is not physically addictive, then why is prolonged use changing someone's cellular structures?
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Old 12-28-2005, 06:37 PM
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The medical community has decided that outpatient treatment for cocaine addiction is just as effective as inpatient treatment. Most insurance companies will not cover the cost even if you can find a rehab to take you. If you are addicted to another substance along with cocaine, such as alcohol, or you are considered suicidal, then chances of finding a treatment facility improve greatly.
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Old 12-28-2005, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjjack
The medical community has decided that outpatient treatment for cocaine addiction is just as effective as inpatient treatment. Most insurance companies will not cover the cost even if you can find a rehab to take you. If you are addicted to another substance along with cocaine, such as alcohol, or you are considered suicidal, then chances of finding a treatment facility improve greatly.
That's true and it's an outrage! One of my clients has a hole burned through his nostril and into his sinus cavity. He was a pipefitter and became addicted to cocaine, to make a long story short, he now has to have surgery to repair the damage.

Of course, he'd tried to get into treatment, but as you said, his insurance didn't cover the cocaine addiction on an inpatient treatment basis.
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Old 12-28-2005, 09:01 PM
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That is crazy and the worst is that that stands in the way of some getting the help they need and can lead to addicts lying about their addiction just to get help. Especially when it is already one of the hardest things they have ever done. What a disfunctional system it seems to be sometimes.
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  #15  
Old 12-28-2005, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derricks Baby
Okay, I'm kinda new at all of this and I just wanted some general info. Before my man got locked up. He was really strung out on cocain, and he knew that he needed help. For two weeks we called every different rehab we could find. They all told us the same thing. They said that coke is a mentally addictive drug not a physically addictive drug. In other words they wouldn't except him. Is that true? I know that he wasn't lying because I had spoke to some of the facilities myself.
Well that is one problem that my husband had and played a big part of him being in prison. He was addicted to coke bad. When he first went to county he said the first couple of days was bad but then he was fine. Im not 100% positive, but i do think that it is a craving that they have and to me a craving is physical. But like i said my husband was 200%ready to give all that up and move on with his life. He's been in 6 years now and he said he has no problems with wanting it, so i really can't say if it is mental or phys. Sorry i couldn't help more.~~`Brandi
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Old 12-29-2005, 03:20 AM
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I do have to agree with Cjack in the sense that outpatient treatment can be just as effective if not more so than inpatient. It truley depends on the individual and what substance they are trying to recover from.

In my work I have found that Alcoholics do better in residential treatment first starting in detox and working into a 30-90 day Residential program into an outpatient for approx. 6 months. Slowly integrating into life. Just as it is helpful for addicts of all sorts.

Unfortunately Cocaine Addiction can be a secondary diagnosis so in order to get into treatment hopefully a person a professional is trying to help will use a different diagnosis in order to get the help. It is usually suggestions that can be quite helpful.
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Old 03-06-2006, 06:20 PM
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Ack this one I know of all too well, cocaine is addictive seeming I had a 1,000 a day habit for 3 years!

If a place refuses you treatment they need to be turned into the state for violating your rights to treatment!
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