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The War on Drugs - and the results of it A war against drugs, or against families?

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  #51  
Old 03-04-2017, 10:46 PM
de8er de8er is offline
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5lbs may not be personal use, but hell a pound was personal use for me when I was using drugs a lot. I would buy a pound to last me a year.

That prison sentence is insane though.
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  #52  
Old 03-05-2017, 01:17 AM
Minor activist Minor activist is offline
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The OP wondered whether it's going to look funny later on that we put people in prison for selling plants.

One possible answer is a quote from Shakespeare.

Quote:
His jest will savour but of shallow wit,
When thousands weep more than did laugh at it.
Though if OP can look back and laugh at his own pain, it will probably help with getting back on his feet again.
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  #53  
Old 03-27-2017, 06:59 PM
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This guy had 2.4 pounds, and fell under the trafficking law. He also had one prior conviction.

A legislature and prosecutor and judge all thought this was grounds for a life sentence.

http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/in..._threshol.html
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  #54  
Old 03-28-2017, 02:49 PM
kathyradellvn kathyradellvn is offline
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I am amazed at how people look at pot. In my very conservative eyes it is a drug no different than any other kind of drug you can get addicted to. How can one drug be ok to use, even though there are restrictions on how much you can have at one time, than any other drug. Most people claim that it isn't addictive. Really? Why do people risk getting it, go to jail/prison because of it if it isn't addictive. My poor grandson just moved to CO because he thinks it is dumb that he can't smoke pot everyday legally in the state he lives in! He has a very rude awakening coming. The reality of his situation is he is a drug user. He isn't smart enough to realize that there are very strict laws concerning the use of pot in states where it is legalized. He can just see himself laying around all day with a happy grin on his face because he is high. When people get caught with pot they want an excuse for why they can't use it, why are they going to jail or prison, it was only pot! I feel like, once again because of my very conservative upbringing, obey the law! I have seen my son go from smoking pot, doing other drugs because pot just wasn't enough, becoming a registered sex offender, serving time, coming home, doing well, getting off of parole, getting back on drugs and now serving more time. He has not had near the problems as a sex offender as he has had being on drugs. He gets caught with the drugs every time. I have a hard time understanding that, he knows that the heroine, meth, pain pills are very bad, says he won't do them again but always leaves a little space for pot! Not addictive? No one will ever convince me of that. If you still choose to do it be careful, it is still considered a drug and in most states it is still against the law. Breaking the law usually means jail/prison time.
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  #55  
Old 03-28-2017, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kathyradellvn View Post
I am amazed at how people look at pot. In my very conservative eyes it is a drug no different than any other kind of drug you can get addicted to. How can one drug be ok to use, even though there are restrictions on how much you can have at one time, than any other drug. Most people claim that it isn't addictive. Really? Why do people risk getting it, go to jail/prison because of it if it isn't addictive. My poor grandson just moved to CO because he thinks it is dumb that he can't smoke pot everyday legally in the state he lives in! He has a very rude awakening coming. The reality of his situation is he is a drug user. He isn't smart enough to realize that there are very strict laws concerning the use of pot in states where it is legalized. He can just see himself laying around all day with a happy grin on his face because he is high. When people get caught with pot they want an excuse for why they can't use it, why are they going to jail or prison, it was only pot! I feel like, once again because of my very conservative upbringing, obey the law! I have seen my son go from smoking pot, doing other drugs because pot just wasn't enough, becoming a registered sex offender, serving time, coming home, doing well, getting off of parole, getting back on drugs and now serving more time. He has not had near the problems as a sex offender as he has had being on drugs. He gets caught with the drugs every time. I have a hard time understanding that, he knows that the heroine, meth, pain pills are very bad, says he won't do them again but always leaves a little space for pot! Not addictive? No one will ever convince me of that. If you still choose to do it be careful, it is still considered a drug and in most states it is still against the law. Breaking the law usually means jail/prison time.
I hope you're not implying that his pot use has anything to do with him being a sex offender, that would be silly. In general, I think where people are coming from is that marijuana in general does not cause many negative effects. It's not going to kill you, you aren't going to overdose and it doesn't cause any serious health issues. What can become psychologically addictive can be said of most substances. Hell, people get addicted to coffee. When compared to substances like tobacco and alcohol, pot is relatively harmless.

"It's only pot."

That means, it's only pot, it's not gonna kill me. The legal problems your grandson faced are not a result of the drug's effects, they are a result of the illegality. I'm not defending his drug use, hell, I have a very significant drug history and of course I "started" on pot. But pot was not the reason I tried other drugs. I tried other drugs because after smoking pot, I thought "Well that wasn't so bad, I didn't turn into a terrorist, the other stuff they said must have been lies, too." So I ventured into psychedelics. I was never much of an amphetamine or opiate user, I preferred the psychedelic experiences that gave me perspectives unachievable during normal consciousness. However, what did get me in trouble was the fact I did not respect the government's position and started sharing (dealing) the drugs which I felt had given me great benefit. And I paid the price for it.

But let's not lump everything into one basket, shall we?

I wish you and your grandson the best. I hope he can stay sober and stay out of trouble. The criminal justice system is no carnival. But sometimes a little perspective can be helpful in understanding and having some compassion and understanding for a position we cannot naturally relate.

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  #56  
Old 03-28-2017, 04:41 PM
Minor activist Minor activist is offline
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Quote:
If you still choose to do it be careful, it is still considered a drug and in most states it is still against the law. Breaking the law usually means jail/prison time.
Citizens have a duty to change the law if necessary, not only to obey it.
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  #57  
Old 03-28-2017, 05:01 PM
kathyradellvn kathyradellvn is offline
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I understand what you are saying and I want to make it clear that I do not want to judge any one for smoking pot, drinking beer, being addicted to coffee, etc. My main objection to it is pot is against the law so if you do it and get caught don't make a fuss about it, you knew it was against the law when you were doing it. I believe that pot can be used for very constructive things such as medicinal purposes but go thru the proper channels and do it legally. I do not in any way blame pot for my son being a RSO. He was at a party, he was high on pot, drinking beer, he made the decision to be there, he placed himself in that situation. he also made the decision to have sex with an underage girl. Would he have done the same thing if he would have not been high? or drunk? I don't know the answer to that. He made the choice now he is paying the price. I hope when he comes home he will give up all drugs because they are all illegal and he has nothing to gain by using them except more jail time and most likely prison time.
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  #58  
Old 03-28-2017, 06:43 PM
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A different perspective on "breaking the laws here in America" is found in the book "Three Felonies a Day", How the Feds target the innocent, by Harvey Silverglate. His theory is that because of the massive numbers of actions that have been made into felony crimes here (and possibly the only place on the planet where they are crimes), everyone in this country commits 3 prosecutable felonies every day, many without being aware that they are crimes.
Another interesting book is "Licensed to Lie" by Sidney Powell that documents perjury and prosecutorial misconduct running rampant in the US Department of Justice.

In order to have the most prisoners in the world requires either the most evil citizenry, or millions of overcriminalized acts, and it doesn't hurt to have prosecutors who ignore the law in order to enhance their conviction statistics.
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  #59  
Old 03-29-2017, 02:05 AM
Minor activist Minor activist is offline
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Oh my. The first paragraph of the first review on Amazon is
Quote:
As a federal criminal defense attorney for nearly 20 years, this book resounded LOUDLY with me. The acts of the U.S. Attorney that she describes are endemic. I have been lied to, threatened with bar complaints and had complaints made to judges behind my back, all for trying to provide a zealous defense to my client. Everything Sidney Powell says here is true.
------------

Thanks to KD for the respectful and civil acknowledgement. Let me do the same, and express my agreement that drugs that make people stupider are the opposite of what the country needs. The laws against them have a shocking history and cruel impact, and that fuels my political activity while my heart goes out to the families of people who wreck their lives with drugs. I'll acknowledge the point, too, that people wreck their lives with weed. It's not easy but I've seen it done more than once.
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  #60  
Old 03-29-2017, 06:36 AM
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I watched what happened to Ted Stevens, the long serving US Senator from Alaska. A few nasty law enforcement agents, plus some unethical federal prosecutors railroaded him into a corruption conviction. The "informant", a business owner who was paid by a hugely reduced punishment for his own crimes, said he remodeled Ted's home as a quid pro quo payment for legislative favors. Ted's defense, he was a friend who did work for me, but I paid for all of it. Ted was convicted, resigned from the senate, and was killed in a plane crash.

Eventually the prosecutors were found to have hidden exculpatory proof that yes, Ted did pay for the work. His conviction was vacated, but of course the prosecutors were not punished. Not all federal prosecutors are unethical, but overly aggressive tactics, whether illegal or on the borderline of legality, are rewarded by the DOJ and rarely punished.
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  #61  
Old 03-29-2017, 09:16 AM
Minor activist Minor activist is offline
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And I think we can all agree, no matter what, that a life sentence for small-time dealing is just not right.
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