Welcome to the Prison Talk Online Community! Take a Minute and Sign Up Today!






Go Back   Prison Talk > RESOURCE CENTER > Native American Prisoner Discussions
Register Entertainment FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Native American Prisoner Discussions Dedicated to Native American prisoners and their loved ones.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 08-01-2011, 11:16 PM
yourself yourself is online now
attorney
 

Join Date: May 2010
Location: around
Posts: 11,376
Thanks: 3,981
Thanked 19,661 Times in 7,086 Posts
Default

I'm adopted. I could be all things. I grew up with that knowledge. Do you exclude me because of this?

How about my NA boy? His mom was die hard Southern Baptist, and half NA. His father wasn't. He's Southern Baptist. Do you exclude him? or just the parts of him that aren't NA? Oh, and he's registered. (FWIW, I refer to him as my boy because I took care of him for a year after tragedy in his family. Any kid who eats at my table, sleeps in my house, for whom I've bought clothes and shoes, and talks to me after waking from a bad dream for an entire year is my boy, no matter how old he gets. and any time he wants or needs me, he knows I'm there)
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #52  
Old 08-02-2011, 08:05 PM
Toltec_Mouse's Avatar
Toltec_Mouse Toltec_Mouse is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 4
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Tricky question. Given the anglo's history with Native American subjects it is understandable to be very skeptical about any anglo's doing the lodge. Inipis are are not very common and I'm sure the water pourer can excercise his/her preference on who can sweat.
__________________
"A warrior takes his lot, whatever it may be, and accepts it in ultimate humbleness. He accepts in humbleness what he is, not as grounds for regret but as a living challenge." - Don Juan Matus
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 08-02-2011, 09:50 PM
Dawnsong Dawnsong is offline
Banned
 

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: California
Posts: 46
Thanks: 22
Thanked 17 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by crow woman View Post
My husband is Native American and very much into his traditions. He says 'being a Native American is not just the color of your skin, there are people who are Native American on the inside, who walk the Red Road to the best of their abilities, you can't see on the outside what is on the inside.' There are also Native American people who are not Native on the inside. Meaning, it is the road you walk on that should determine whether you can attend a Sweat. In prison circumstances, it also should be depending on what crime you are in for. Rapists and childmolesters should never be allowed in a Sweat Lodge. Also two spirited people should sweat separate.

Wanting to attend the Sacred Ceremony of the Sweat Lodge has to do with religion, not with the color of your skin. I understand where your husband is coming from though, all too many things have been and still are being taken from the People. But both my husband and I strongly feel that Religion is the most important thing. If we keep thinking and feeling that certain religions are only meant for certain races or peoples, we will never find peace.

The colors of the Medicine Wheel are Red, yellow, white and black, the colors of the four races of the people on our Mother Earth. Only when we can unite and enjoy being together in humility and respect, only then we can find inner peace. I myself had the honor to be invited (and attended) to a Sweat Ceremony on the Rosebud Reservation by Jim (James) Robideau. And I am a white woman on the outside. Again, I do understand, but that doesn't make it right.

In respect
Crow Woman
I was shocked to read this post which states on the one hand.....

that certain people should never be allowed to sweat depending on their crime and...

that Two Sprited People ie: Gays Lesbians Bi-sexual and Transgender should sweat separate...

while at the same time saying.....

Only when we can unite and enjoy being together in humility and respect, only then we can find inner peace.

Surely this is a contradiction .....judgemental ..... one persons opinion ?

My limited understanding of the teachings of the Red Road is compassion for all People for all time....that we are all one family ......
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 08-03-2011, 11:44 AM
deerwoman deerwoman is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: TX
Posts: 463
Thanks: 1
Thanked 372 Times in 149 Posts
Default

Greetings,

It is hard to try to explain our ways to other people. Each tribe have their own traditions, customs and cultural ways including the sweat lodge. It has been passed down from generations. If they invite you to participate, then consider it an honor. I have friends that still keep the stomp dance. The mikko and his helpers sometime sit in the circle and talk. I ask the mikko's wife if he tells her what they talk about and she said no. She didn't ask, she just did what was expected of her--cook for family and friends. Some things you have to respect, not holler discrimination.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to deerwoman For This Useful Post:
Toltec_Mouse (08-03-2011), Tuesday123 (08-17-2011)
  #55  
Old 08-03-2011, 07:39 PM
yourself yourself is online now
attorney
 

Join Date: May 2010
Location: around
Posts: 11,376
Thanks: 3,981
Thanked 19,661 Times in 7,086 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by deerwoman View Post
Greetings,

It is hard to try to explain our ways to other people. Each tribe have their own traditions, customs and cultural ways including the sweat lodge. It has been passed down from generations. If they invite you to participate, then consider it an honor. I have friends that still keep the stomp dance. The mikko and his helpers sometime sit in the circle and talk. I ask the mikko's wife if he tells her what they talk about and she said no. She didn't ask, she just did what was expected of her--cook for family and friends. Some things you have to respect, not holler discrimination.
Yes, each people have their own traditions, customs, and cultural ways. But, my understanding is those prisons that have sweat lodges only have one sweat lodge, usually constructed under the guidance of an elder from the people most represented in the prison, or the people most represented in the community surrounding the prison.

Prison is a make due sort of place - and it might be a bit off topic, but who's to keep anybody out of a sweat lodge in a prison? Granted, you can keep people out when one group is using it for their services, but that doesn't negate the rights of others to utilize those same facilities for their services where relevant. Personally, I find it as awkward as using the same space for all Christian/Jewish/Wiccan/etc services. But, space is limited, funds are limited, and people are allowed to express their beliefs with the space available.

The other thing I've found in working with prison populations; the experience can be a powerful experience that can lead to great spiritual exploration and journey. People who were vaguely aware of their spiritual heritage can become deeply engrossed in that journey resulting in the prison experience being much more than a mere punishment, but a spiritual awakening. Others will explore a variety of spiritual practices until the find one that "fits". For those willing to take that journey of spiritual awakening - let them.

Personally, anything that allows or helps a person get through prison positively is a good thing, and if that means a man who doesn't meet the blood quota for a particular People finds community, solace, and especially spiritual awakening among a more robust People, then who are we to deter him? If you can't refer him to a group engaged in the practice of his people, then what are our obligations?
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 08-04-2011, 09:02 AM
deerwoman deerwoman is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: TX
Posts: 463
Thanks: 1
Thanked 372 Times in 149 Posts
Default

Greetings,

Ahh, prison system. That's a different story. My son is the elder and teacher in the Native circle where he is incarcerated. He said it was difficult because some of the guys that go in have no clue to any native ways. It is the typical "my grandmother was an Indian princess" sort of atmosphere. I doubt if any of the other guys would ever meet the blood quotum required of tribes or nation, but my son does his best to teach them the ways of our people.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to deerwoman For This Useful Post:
DsLatinCutie (06-16-2014), yourself (08-04-2011)
  #57  
Old 08-17-2011, 04:20 PM
Shunka Shunka is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: northern Germany
Posts: 102
Thanks: 2
Thanked 17 Times in 11 Posts
Default

It has taken a long time until the Native American religion finally found official acceptance by the new rulers of the USA. I am glad that Natives got allowed to practice their religion again, even at prison lately. But there is something strange as long as this religion is seen as bound to race, while other religions are practiced among people of many different races and origins and the people don't wonder about that. Free choice of religion should be a right which is true for all religions and all people. That's why I see it as completely unacceptable if any officials who are not followers of the specific religion (the Native American religion) themselves, for example prison staff, forbids those who are White or who can't prove they are Native to take part at Native ceremonies. For luck in most prisons it isn't forbidden, because those who don't even take part shouldn't be those who decide. As far as I know in most prisons the other prisoners themselves decide if they allow non-natives to take part at their ceremonies and under which conditions non-natives get permission to take part or get excluded. Some Native prison circles don't allow Non-Natives in general. These decisions must be accepted because you can't be forced to do something personal like a Sweat Lodge with people with whom you don't feel comfortable. However, it should be a decision among the people themselves and not by others. And every group should decide individually, which means if one comes to another place it would be okay to ask for acceptance of the group of that place, even if other groups sent them away. However, I want to say clearly that it would be illogical whenever Christians said just Natives may follow the Native religion (or have the right to make the ceremonies of the religion of their choice in prison, if the Native American religion is the religion of their choice), while the ancestors of those people of European origin who are mostly the officials at US-prisons brought the Christian religion to people of all colors in all parts of the world, even by force... Religion and race should be able to exist separated from each other and this should be true for all religions. No one should be forced to a specific religion or excluded from a specific religion in general by birth or by genes. We all have a free spirit and live by our own mind. But if one has no earnest interest in Native spirituality but is just curious about trying "a new kind of "sauna"", it might make sense to exclude them from Sweat Lodge, especially if there is reason to believe they might act (or feel) in a way which would be disturbing for the ceremony. If this danger is not given it may be okay to include them because the curiousity may change to something of deeper worth. But it might be better to have these people in a Native spirituality talking circle or a talking stick round for some time weeks or months before they get allowed to take part at a Sweat. By this the Natives have a chance to get to know them before they decide if they may take part at Sweat Lodge.
And about enrollment: I know for several reasons there are thousands of full-blood and partly-blooded Native Americans who don't have the official documents of enrollment to proof their origin. But in former times it was the word that counted for Natives. Would be sad if now a piece of paper were all that counts...
Some Natives fear their religion would get robbed by those who want to join it. But that's unlogical. It was robbed by those who converted them to Christianity by force. But a religion doesn't get robbed by sharing it. It just increases the number of people who live by this religion, but it doesn't make the number of Native Americans who live by it smaller. And Natives know how much damage has been done by followers of other religions like the Christian religion. So it should be clear to Natives that it is a step in the right direction if as many people as possible learn to respect nature, understand to be part of nature and of the Great Spirit which connectes all living beings with each other. Maybe the growing interest in the old traditional earth-bound religions, which died out in Europe a much too long time ago, can help to save Mother Earth. But sadly those Non-Natives, who decide to follow the Native ways, are often outsiders, because they don't fit in into western society because of their religion and they don't fit into Native society because of their race and because many Natives don't accept them as followers or even feel offended by it in some way. So yes, it's a big problem. But religion is something that comes from your heart and is not dependent on race or on how much acceptance you find among other people. And people can always find at least some people who accept them the way they are if searching long enough. Mitakuye oyasin.

Last edited by Shunka; 08-17-2011 at 04:22 PM..
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Shunka For This Useful Post:
<3Yas<3 (08-20-2011)
  #58  
Old 08-17-2011, 04:27 PM
Tuesday123 Tuesday123 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Laconia New Hampshire
Posts: 1,889
Thanks: 1,737
Thanked 1,903 Times in 891 Posts
Default

What exactly is considered a "non native"? I was adopted, and it wasnt until I was about 32 that I got a DNA test to help me understand my ethnic background. The test showed I am 14% native American, 2% Sub-Saharan African and 84% European. ( the tests were so new they couldnt break down what part of Europe)

My thought is, how does one decide who is considered if you will, and who is not to be considered a native American?

ETA I meant in no way in hopes for "money" I mean considered under your terms for being considered native American. We all are many things, and we all have a right to understand our heritage and where we come from. How does certain people become excluded from such birth rights?



Quote:
Originally Posted by tluna1051 View Post
My man and I have had long talks bout sweat lodge participants, non-native and natives. Whom should be allowed to take part in sweat lodges. He, himself says ONLY NATIVES should attend, I agree to a certain extent. But I'd like to know other people view...thanks
__________________





Last edited by Tuesday123; 08-17-2011 at 05:22 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 08-17-2011, 04:39 PM
Tuesday123 Tuesday123 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Laconia New Hampshire
Posts: 1,889
Thanks: 1,737
Thanked 1,903 Times in 891 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by deerwoman View Post
I doubt if any of the other guys would ever meet the blood quotum required of tribes or nation,
If your son's teachings are coming from the heart, then I dont see why you would be so quick to say they would "never meet the blood quot um required of tribes or nation"

Its about the willingness to learn, understand, and be a part of.

I feel you have made up your mind already. As much as I wish that I didn't believe it to be true.
__________________




Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 08-17-2011, 05:15 PM
Tuesday123 Tuesday123 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Laconia New Hampshire
Posts: 1,889
Thanks: 1,737
Thanked 1,903 Times in 891 Posts
Default

Please define your definition of native American. Im not understanding.










Quote:
Originally Posted by goddessangelluv View Post
I think the sweat lodge should be open only to native americans unless they are married to someone of another race then open it to the wife/husband and any kids of the couple other wise stay out
__________________




Reply With Quote
  #61  
Old 08-18-2011, 08:03 AM
deerwoman deerwoman is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: TX
Posts: 463
Thanks: 1
Thanked 372 Times in 149 Posts
Default

Read the statement "blood quantum required by tribes or nations". Each tribe has their own criteria of enrollment and some of them requires tribal blood quantum.
Are you an American Indian, lil athena.
To add I know who I am, what I am from when I was born.
If the guys want to learn from the heart that is fine, that is why my son is a teacher. What have I already made up my mind on?
Truly they have a blood test that will break down different ethnic blood. Does it tell you which tribe?

Last edited by deerwoman; 08-18-2011 at 08:11 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 08-18-2011, 08:49 AM
Shunka Shunka is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: northern Germany
Posts: 102
Thanks: 2
Thanked 17 Times in 11 Posts
Default

Let me ad a quote, something I have read today. It was written by Ed McGaa, who is a Lakota and author of some books. He wrote:

Quote:
"The Inipi, or Sweat Lodge, is becoming a sought-after ceremony across the nation. Many non-Indians as well as off-reservation Indians living in cities have found vacant spaces to build sweat lodges. The holding of sweat lodge ceremonies off the reservation is certaintly nothing that the Rainbow Tribe [meant with this term are people who are not Native America but who live by the Native ways in a good and respectful and sincere way] can lay claim to. Throughout North America, this ceremony has been conducted by numerous Native Americans and non-Native Americans. The lodge can be built in only a few hours out of saplings, and it provides a spiritual experience that no cathedral can match.
In my experience, most sweat lodge conductors, water purers, or lodge leaders have their own particular way of conducting a lodge. I have never seen two leaders conduct the ceremony exactly alike. But many lodge leaders seem to have some things in common. One method or practice is to beseech each direction separately and uniquely during the course of the ceremony.
Inipi means "to live again." No one should claim a patent on religion or spirituality. The people I have been associated with in natural ceremony simply want to pray in such a way that they can draw from the power of nature. No one tribe or group of people can lay claim to the forces of nature. Across the planet, down through the ages, tribes of all colors have prayed to a natural, Great Mystery form of power. Just because organized Christianity put a stop to natural beseechment in most parts of the western hemisphere does not mean that European descendants should be held back from natural beseeching in a simple lodge that they choose to construct. I hope that no one nationality or ethic group owns the willows or the saplings or the fallen firewood of the forest. If white people were praying and working together in their newly constructed lodges to put all Native Americans back into boarding schools and were planning to have us all forced into one religionthrough government manipulation, then by all means I would not want them in any ceremony. But this is not the case. I do not believe that sweat lodges and related forms of beseechment structures existed in the Americas alone. People are now going back to spiritual yearnings linked mysteriously to their genes, yearnings that reach back to Celtic, Germanic, Nordic, Lap, Mongolian, and a host of other tribal pasts. Natural Way beseechment people will be strong allies of Native Americans and the Earth as time moves on. [...] It would be very foolish for Native Americans not to realize what true friends we are cultivating through the movement of the Natural Way.

Let me ad some personal words now once again. Some people may still wonder why some people of european origin for example are interested in Sweat Lodges and/or why they try to learn the Natural Way from Native Americans and why they join their ceremonies.

A long time ago people in Europe, like the celts for example, knew how to live in harmony with the nature. They even had sweat lodges as far as I know. But the celts and other tribes got more or less forced to change to the Christian religion. Their old culture got destroyed and most of their old wisdom and knowledge got lost because they didn't write things down. Nowadays there are people who wished they could regain this old wisdom and live by the old ways again. But the time in which Europeans lived in such a way has been so long ago that really most is lost. Some have made efforts to re-activate this old way of living although there is noone they could ask how it has been in these days. I know in the USA there is a quite high number of wicca and other paganists. However, in Germany where I come from you find nearly no wicca or paganists at all, and those who you are there are normally not organizated. Years ago I tried to find people with whom I can join together to learn how to worship Mother Earth in a good way and to join them to spend time together with similar-minded people. But my efforts were not efficient. Years later finally my interest in the Red Road and the Native American ways got born. Their wisdom is not lost. We can learn so much from them. So why shouldn't we learn from those who are willing to teach? And about the sweat lodge: If it's true, that sweat lodges once have existed in European culture as well and that many people have found back to the routs and chosen a nature-based religion, why should the sweat lodge in prison be just for Native American circles? Shouldn't wicca for example be allowed to conduct their own sweat lodge ceremonies at prison? Shouldn't sweat lodge ceremonies in celtic style for example be allowed as well?

In Germany you usually don't find Native Americans, I've never met one personally during my whole life. And of course in German prisons you don't find Sweat Lodges at all but just a few Sweat Lodges in the free land. I've once been to a Sweat Lodge which was completely led by Germans and the participants were also all Germans. The leader was a woman who has learned how to run a Sweat Lodge and among her teachers have been Crow and other Native Americans. However, she doesn't make it in Native American style completely strictly. She makes a mix of different styles. The one in which I was was much in Native American style, more than she makes it usually. I personally don't feel completely comfortable with the mix of styles because I like things to be as originally Native American as possible. And I don't feel comfortable with the limited ways to get contact to these things in Germany. It's often commercial which means people spend a lot of money to be allowed at ceremonies lead by whites, which contain a mix of traditional and modern elements of different tribes and cultures. But on the other hand I would also say that people should be allowed to change things in a way that fits into their culture and lifestyle. The Sweat Lodge I've joined was lead with a lot of respect. We prayed, we sung and we felt. People of all races and origins should be allowed to feel Mother Earth under their feet again and to understand the meaning of it. Then nothing is too late. I have wondered what would have happened if for some reason the Sweat Lodge leader I have spoken of would have come into a US-prison as an inmate. I wonder if in that case the other prisoners would have forbidden her to take part at their Sweat Lodges by looking at her skincolor. In that case she would have been in a "so near but also so far away" situation. Maybe she would have spent years in that prison without the chance to join the Sweat Lodges, although Sweat Lodges have been an important substantial part of her life and spirituality. I know this is imaginative, but I also know many people at US-prisons are in fact in a similar situation, excluded from what their hearts are longing for. This is... simply not good... Beeing in prison is terrible enough, so why making it even harder?
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Shunka For This Useful Post:
<3Yas<3 (08-20-2011), nimuay (08-20-2011)
  #63  
Old 08-20-2011, 06:38 PM
<3Yas<3 <3Yas<3 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Lincolnshire, UK
Posts: 25
Thanks: 53
Thanked 15 Times in 9 Posts
Default

I beleive in earned rights, rather than birth rights.
And people reaping what they personally sow, rather than their rights being determined by skin colour.
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 12-27-2011, 10:43 PM
RGs_love RGs_love is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: CA,US
Posts: 148
Thanks: 128
Thanked 49 Times in 39 Posts
Default

There are Native Americans who are also pimping the sweatlodge ceremonies. Taking advantage of well off White people and other city people who have not grown up around ceremony. I personally know a family from Rosebud(rez), who was running Sun Dance in Big Mountain (AZ). Yup you know who I'm talking about. This Rosebud family took advantage of people from CA mostly from the Los Angeles area, but when I came around to some of these peoples home they that family from Rosebud got nervous. Because they know my mom from Rosebud and my dad from Kyle PineRidge and my relatives from Eagle Butte. I discovered they were secretly having seperate sweats for white people and charging big bucks, and made a family in San Pedro sell their home,because it was a supposedly vision, and they made that family buy some land in CA for them. They are Lakota like me, so we can't say Non Natives are messing up our ceremonies, it's because we have let them to a point . White people can attend sweats but I don't think they can run it, or carry a bundle. I think that is what my uncle Arvol LookingHorse had a meeting about in 2003. You bet I told my dad and my uncle Arvol about what they were doing, and guess what that family was asked my Arvol LookingHorse keeper of the sacred pipe to attend gathering regarding abuse of ceremonies and they were a No Show.

But yes I'm understanding of natives wanting to have sweats only with natives. I myself only attend when I'm home in South Dakota. Here in CA there is too much crazy energy and people getting high before a sweat. and the added new aging stuff annoys me. But I stay away. We should be able to sweat with people we feel comfortable with, if it doesn't feel right don't.
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 12-27-2011, 11:12 PM
hardhitter5050's Avatar
hardhitter5050 hardhitter5050 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 67
Thanks: 9
Thanked 32 Times in 25 Posts
Default

I sweated almost every Sunday in prison with the Natives....THEY invited me because they enjoyed my company...I didnt ask them if I could go, they asked me....it was something I looked forward to very much.....I went as a guest and sat quietly everytime....it was good times!
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 12-28-2011, 10:27 AM
Straight Straight is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: dallas tx
Posts: 872
Thanks: 62
Thanked 1,547 Times in 502 Posts
Default

Sounds like it would be discrimination if anyone was excluded. You pick the sub-category... religious discrimination, race discrimination... probably others it could be fit into.

People all want equality until it's them that has to be the one to be equal. Then all of a sudden it's different.

Either anyone and everyone can go in, or no one gets to holler discrimination about anything.

Simple. Equality has to work both ways and it has to include everything, or it's "selective equality", and then everyone gets to play that card.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Straight For This Useful Post:
hardhitter5050 (12-28-2011)
  #67  
Old 04-17-2012, 12:16 PM
connie73's Avatar
connie73 connie73 is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Toppenish,
Posts: 76
Thanks: 43
Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts
Default

I think it just depends the person. If you allow a non member, that is up the family and how they were taught. I was raised that as long as the person who is coming to the ceremony knows what to expect and respect the way. I don't get into the whole ndn, or non ndn thing. It doesn't make sense to bring up bad feelings or thoughts. If you allow it okay, if not okay. Life goes on.
__________________
Con
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 07-14-2012, 10:28 AM
NatesGurl's Avatar
NatesGurl NatesGurl is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: May 2012
Location: IN, USA
Posts: 221
Thanks: 57
Thanked 76 Times in 49 Posts
Default

My 2 cents on this is the majority of Americans have an Native American blood line in them, so define to me who we are talking about? My LO has Cherokee in him as well as I do, so would you say he shouldn't be allowed in the Sweat Lodge? Evidently it is up to each Prison as my man looking white but definitely a Native American blood line does go to the Sweat Lodge where he is located and even lead one...? sorry I feel like there is enough discrimination in the world and even if you aren't full blooded Native American doesn't mean you should be excluded.. just saying sorry if I offend anyone
__________________




Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 10-01-2012, 03:11 PM
HisNDNgirl HisNDNgirl is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: SE Ontario
Posts: 652
Thanks: 261
Thanked 272 Times in 188 Posts
Default

Our religion is culture based so someone can't become Native. If your not catholic you can't take part in mass/have the sacraments, so I think it's fair to say you have to be Native to sweat. Now I would accept a non-Native who has married in or whose step parent is Native and that's how heheh are being raised. However it is tricky cuz I am not a fan of the divide and conquer status issues that I'm sure the governments are all thrilled to see we have taken to extremes. There are up here whole tribes who are not status due to not signing treaty, tons who are adopted and struggling to get status for being taken prior to being registered. Then there is the double mother clause and while just recently undone still lots who have yet to apply. Plus I have friends in the states who are full Native but not registered cuz their background is from so many different rez's. It's a tough one to figure out.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 06-07-2014, 04:15 PM
PDGreene PDGreene is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Oklahoma USA
Posts: 117
Thanks: 15
Thanked 63 Times in 36 Posts
Default

My man is cherokee and speaks fluent cherokee however he don't have a roll number for whatever reason. He is in the prison system as white even though he is native. He leads alot of the sweatlodges they do. The sweat lodges seem to help him alot. I think to myself if a person is honest when they come to the lodge and truly want to be apart and come in the right spirit I they should be welcome. However if they come with bad intentions then no but sometimes you can't tell what someones intentions are. I am Cherokee, choctaw and creek nations. Cherokee and Creek from my mother and Choctaw from my father. I have never been to a sweat lodge however I do know that they are very spiritual. I don't think people should come just because it is a fad and many people are jumping on it because it sounds new age or something. To me that is the wrong reason. This is a touchy subject it seems like.

Last edited by PDGreene; 06-07-2014 at 04:22 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 06-14-2014, 04:43 PM
Necie_Ellis's Avatar
Necie_Ellis Necie_Ellis is offline
Mrs. Ellis
 

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 41
Thanks: 1
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NatesGurl View Post
My 2 cents on this is the majority of Americans have an Native American blood line in them, so define to me who we are talking about? My LO has Cherokee in him as well as I do, so would you say he shouldn't be allowed in the Sweat Lodge? Evidently it is up to each Prison as my man looking white but definitely a Native American blood line does go to the Sweat Lodge where he is located and even lead one...? sorry I feel like there is enough discrimination in the world and even if you aren't full blooded Native American doesn't mean you should be excluded.. just saying sorry if I offend anyone
I completely agree with you on that one my husband and I are both native his mother is full Ojibwa and his father is full white but my husband looks white has blue eyes and white skin as for me my mother is half Ojibwa and my father is white and I'm blue eyed and white skin... So I agree should we be excluded because we don't look a certain way?? He goes to sweats all the time when he's home and while he's locked down he goes to them and leads them now that he's an elder!! And neither one of us are registered
__________________
Mrs. Ellis
[url=http://www.TickerFactory.com/]
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:46 AM.
Copyright © 2001- 2017 Prison Talk Online
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website Design & Custom vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media
Message Board Statistics