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-   -   They won't let me treat him for Hep C! (http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=694227)

QueenAndKing 09-05-2016 01:47 PM

They won't let me treat him for Hep C!
 
My fiance found out he has hep C last year, through needle sharing from when he was in prison before. We found out together so he never hid it from me. I also got tested and I don't have it... We went to UCLA hospital and they gave him $90,000 worth of hep c pills. Before he could even start the treatment plan, which is similar to chemo therapy, he got arrested. I have called the county jail multiple times and they refuse to let me bring in the medication. He's out in 5 months but i rather have him take the meds in there, which is 3 months long, so he is good when he gets out. He has even told his lawyer and his lawyer got a medical order from the judge but when i call the county jail they say they never got a medical order and if they did they would call me because I am his emergency contact but they never did! What can I do?? I'm not sure what stage he's in but I want him to get treated and get it over with... I don't want it getting any worst then it is. The medication is just sitting in my house. What can i do???

yourself 09-05-2016 02:30 PM

Let me get this straight, you want to bring pills in to him to treat him for Hep C?

Not happening.

While in jail, the healthcare of inmates is relegated to the department controlling that correctional institute. The current standard of care is not the $84K Solvadi cure, or any of it's lesser cost based cures. He is stuck with what the jail will give him.

Barring signing a HIPPA release so UCLA can send over his records, he needs to be tested again and treated by the jail drug formulary according to its standard of care.

You are not going to be able to bring drugs into him. You are not going to be able to force the jail to treat the co-comitant infections that can result from being in jail with a lowered immune system. You are not going to be able to force the jail to deal with the much higher risk of mortality (aka death) that goes along with treating with the cure.

A judge can write in an order a recommendation to the jail, but the jail does not have to obey the judge when it comes to issues of safety and budget. Further, it is well established that for a treatment that isn't lifesaving, the judge has no right to do anything other than recommend. As a result, jails can refuse all sorts of medications that families would carry in, like benzos, stimulants, and Solvadi and related drugs.

Once he's been diagnosed again, assuming he hasn't signed a release with UCLA, they will put him on a treatment that meets with the standard of care. He'll have to wait to do the cure for when he comes out.

Just my view. Might want to talk with a 1983/civil rights attorney to make sure there's nothing out there that suggests otherwise as the HepC cures have had a marked affect on prisons and jails. Once they are the Standard of Care, then the jail will pay for them.

nygirl17 09-05-2016 02:49 PM

Try contacting the judge that drew the order and see where that gets you. But if anything five months is nothing really.Hold string and pray everything will work out the way it's supposed to.

QueenAndKing 09-05-2016 02:52 PM

He got arrested twice. The first time was a ten day probation flash but we didn't know it was going to be only ten days. They let me take the medication to the jail, they screened it and made sure it was the correct medication and not drugs and they gave it to him. He was only on it for 3-4 days before he got released and they gave the meds back to us upon release. Then 1 week later he got arrested again, and this time they are refusing to let me bring the meds in. How is it that I brought it in the first time and not this time? Nothings changed, it's the same medication. It should state in his file that he had the meds brought in previously and make it easier on it but they're not budging. They told me that hep C is the only medication they DONT give them due to budget. So basically he has to suck it up and risk effing up his liver even more because they wanna be assholes.

nygirl17 09-05-2016 04:32 PM

Maybe because they were new and unopened. They let me bring my husband's to him like that as well in county jail but when I tried to bring in a half opened bottle of prilosec they said no.

yourself 09-05-2016 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MyKingAlen (Post 7562202)
He got arrested twice. The first time was a ten day probation flash but we didn't know it was going to be only ten days. They let me take the medication to the jail, they screened it and made sure it was the correct medication and not drugs and they gave it to him. He was only on it for 3-4 days before he got released and they gave the meds back to us upon release. Then 1 week later he got arrested again, and this time they are refusing to let me bring the meds in. How is it that I brought it in the first time and not this time? Nothings changed, it's the same medication. It should state in his file that he had the meds brought in previously and make it easier on it but they're not budging. They told me that hep C is the only medication they DONT give them due to budget. So basically he has to suck it up and risk effing up his liver even more because they wanna be assholes.

Simple - they usually allow meds brought in that pass screening for a few days until their med takes over. Once their medical department takes over, then they don't use the meds brought it. It has to be on their formulary. Hep C they don't give due to budget. Benzos they don't give at all, even if you bring them in, due to abuse. And there are other drugs not given once they determine they are not on the formulary. If you go in with a psychiatric condition and meds that cost $3K a month, guaranteed they will move you to a first or second generation psych med that costs $10 a month. It is rough.

You got it the first time because they didn't know what it was or how much it would cost THEM, and because they didn't know what the formulary said was the treatment. As soon as Medical saw him, they put him on the lowest cost alternative that met their formulary requirements.

Look, as soon as Soldari and the like become the Standard of Care, there's not going to be an alternative. Once it becomes the unequivocal Standard of Care, it's used to treat patients requiring the drugs. Before that, you're SOL.

Sucks because in the end it costs us more - more people are infected because he's infected, you risk infection, etc. But this is the short term way of keeping their med costs down along with their liability exposure.

Dakini 09-05-2016 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nygirl17 (Post 7562242)
Maybe because they were new and unopened. They let me bring my husband's to him like that as well in county jail but when I tried to bring in a half opened bottle of prilosec they said no.

Prilosec and the treatment the OP is talking about are two entirely different species.
Treatment for Hep C requires extensive monitoring and almost always comes with side effects. The prison health team is not about to take responsibility for a drug regimen they didn't/won't prescribe.

OP Hopefully he will at least have his condition monitored for the time he's inside. Maybe saving his liver will be an incentive for him to stay out of trouble for a while and get with some support services if he is still using.

sidewalker 09-07-2016 07:37 AM

They did let me bring my hubs medication for a fungal infection on his feet/toe.
He did tell me they gave it to him at *med time* but he was halfway thru it when he was arrested. Not sure why, but I did ask the staff and they called down a nurse to look at the meds.
This was at county jail.

cljinct 09-07-2016 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yourself (Post 7562245)
Simple - they usually allow meds brought in that pass screening for a few days until their med takes over. Once their medical department takes over, then they don't use the meds brought it. It has to be on their formulary. Hep C they don't give due to budget. Benzos they don't give at all, even if you bring them in, due to abuse. And there are other drugs not given once they determine they are not on the formulary. If you go in with a psychiatric condition and meds that cost $3K a month, guaranteed they will move you to a first or second generation psych med that costs $10 a month. It is rough.

You got it the first time because they didn't know what it was or how much it would cost THEM, and because they didn't know what the formulary said was the treatment. As soon as Medical saw him, they put him on the lowest cost alternative that met their formulary requirements.

Look, as soon as Soldari and the like become the Standard of Care, there's not going to be an alternative. Once it becomes the unequivocal Standard of Care, it's used to treat patients requiring the drugs. Before that, you're SOL.

Sucks because in the end it costs us more - more people are infected because he's infected, you risk infection, etc. But this is the short term way of keeping their med costs down along with their liability exposure.

This is not necessarily true across the board. My boyfriend was in the process of being treated with the harvoni for hep C when he was put in prison for violation of probation and the prison infirmary contacted is healthcare provider and I was tasked with picking up the medication every 2 weeks and bringing it to the prison so they could complete the course of treatment ..which by the way was successful and as the op states very expensive

yourself 09-08-2016 07:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cljinct (Post 7562956)
This is not necessarily true across the board. My boyfriend was in the process of being treated with the harvoni for hep C when he was put in prison for violation of probation and the prison infirmary contacted is healthcare provider and I was tasked with picking up the medication every 2 weeks and bringing it to the prison so they could complete the course of treatment ..which by the way was successful and as the op states very expensive

One of the reasons that prisons are not keen on Solvadi becoming the SOC is because it's so expensive. Look at the stats on prisoners and Hep C, and the rate of Hep C transmission, then multiply the maximum $80K up front costs of the drug (I think Medicare/caid has it down to $45K, but only gives it to a very few as it isn't the SOC....... yet....). Solvadi and similar treatments would bankrupt the systems if SOC. The prisons, especially the for profits, do not want this expense cutting into their bottom line.

Be very glad you were able to bring it in. Your jail must have a very progressive medical as most jails and their legal counsel do not want the risk, especially because the treatment impacts the immune system and jails and prisons are hotbeds of disease transmission. Throw in the extreme reactions people can have, and the fact that it's not the SOC, and you can see why jails and prisons do not want people taking those drugs and getting cured (or dead. People die taking those drugs. It is a very real possibility that leads to law suits. Yet another expense the jails and prisons don't want).

Your LO must have had a short sentence, must have been well into the treatment (so the worst of the side effects were over), and must have paid for the drugs privately. Again, your jail must be very progressive.

If you go to the health forum here, you'll see most of us are well aware of the costs associated with Solvadi and the like. Yes, it is very expensive, and there is a huge ethical debate about the expense.

Glad it worked for you LO and his treatment was not interrupted. Be very happy your jail was progressive enough in its thinking to allow what you did. Most will not.

Fridyrr.Likn 09-20-2016 11:19 AM

It's very very unlikely that his Hep C is going to progress to another stage in 5 months, especially if he was recently diagnosed. Thousands and thousands of people live 25 years or more after being diagnosed and never have a single symptom If they were ready to start treatment and estimated that it would be cured in 3 months then he's in pretty good shape. Hep C treatment is HELL and he would be much better off doing it at home anyway. There's no way that the county jail is going to take that risk. You are very fortunate that you have the medication ready for him to start, unless it's going to expire before he gets out just wait the 5 months and let him do it at home. Also, as a side note, he needs to make sure he's done messing around with drugs. Drugs and treatment for Hep C don't mix....

TLC2 09-24-2016 01:57 PM

Which Jail . It took awhile but I finally got mine meds in
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MyKingAlen (Post 7562184)
My fiance found out he has hep C last year, through needle sharing from when he was in prison before. We found out together so he never hid it from me. I also got tested and I don't have it... We went to UCLA hospital and they gave him $90,000 worth of hep c pills. Before he could even start the treatment plan, which is similar to chemo therapy, he got arrested. I have called the county jail multiple times and they refuse to let me bring in the medication. He's out in 5 months but i rather have him take the meds in there, which is 3 months long, so he is good when he gets out. He has even told his lawyer and his lawyer got a medical order from the judge but when i call the county jail they say they never got a medical order and if they did they would call me because I am his emergency contact but they never did! What can I do?? I'm not sure what stage he's in but I want him to get treated and get it over with... I don't want it getting any worst then it is. The medication is just sitting in my house. What can i do???



I called the person that was in charge of critical issues for that facility . Finding out who that was ... an act of congress. god almighty

Tina Balser 09-24-2016 02:31 PM

After years of abnormal liver test results, my husband was tested for and diagnosed with Hepatitis C. His gastroenterologist said, "A couple of weeks ago, a new drug called Harvoni came on the market. You have the right genotype and you haven't been treated before, so let's see if your insurance company will approve it."

Amazingly - and thankfully - they did.

$1100 per pill - and all we paid every month for the treatment was our $40 co-pay.

One pill a day for three months (some patients require only a two-month treatment, but Dr. Hon believed Michael needed the full three months) and there was no longer any measurable virus in his blood sample. One more clean blood screen and he will be pronounced cured - of a previously incurable disease.

If your doctor says that there is any way your husband can possibly wait until he gets out of prison to begin treatment, encourage him to do so.

The reason I say that is that Michael's doctor said that if he had had the conventional treatment for Hepatitis C (involving interferon), he would not have been able to take Harvoni.

Check with your doctor to see if that is still the case, because further research may have shown that to not have been a valid concern - or the new medicines available might not be adversely affected by previous treatment. However, if your doctor says there still is a reason to avoid interferon-based treatment, try to make sure the prison doesn't start him on any kind of regimen that could preclude taking Harvoni or similar drugs when he gets out.

I know this is worrying you. I understand how you feel. I hope everything goes well for both of you.

TLC2 10-01-2016 03:57 PM

How then will I ever get them to see my husband for the follow up that the jail said he was supposed to have done in 3 months, its been six.
Several issues.

1. Cancerous lesion . He now has two more not seen.

2. Lost 7 Teeth now. Was in middle of dental work right before his arrest. That was four years ago.

I contacted the omsbudsman for his facility as I have left messages with the records, and medical department at least six times. She referred me to Charles Kelso, receivers headquarters. And here we are. I have a health waiver signed. I have a POA, Notarized for all health financial etc. I spoke with the doctor at reception and they did in fact send me a copy of all the medical records. HOWEVER, I CANNOT GET A LIVE PERSON AT CHINO TO ANSWER OR CALL ME BACK . WASCO TOLD HIM HIS RECORDS WERE NOT TRANSFERRED. HIS COUNSELOR COULD CARE LESS IT SEEMS.
WHERE DO I GO FROM HERE?

WRITE THE WARDEN?

Eimantas1989 12-03-2018 05:44 AM

thats awful.. it shouldn't be like that :(


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