View Full Version : should young violent offender be given a second chance


mz aundrey
08-29-2004, 02:57 PM
I HAVE A QUESTION SHOULD YOUNG VIOLENT OFFENDER BE PAROLABLE ? I PERSONALY BELIEVE IN SECOND CHANCES BECAUSE MY GUY HAS BEEN DOWN EVERY SINCE HE WAS 16 AND HE IS DOING 45-LIFE :nono: SO IS THAT LWOP NO CHANCE OF EVER COMING HOME HE WAS SENTENCE IN DC THEY HAD HIM IN STATE PRISON NOW HE'S IN FEDERAL SYSTEM HE'S BEEN LOCK UP FOR 9 YEARS :angry: I DON'T UNDERSTAND WHY THE SYSTEM DON'T GIVE THEM A SECOND CHANCE :eek: AFTER TEN OR MORE DON'T THEY THINK THAT CHANGE THEM I PERSONALY BELIEVE THAT HE IS A BETTER MAN NOW THAN 9 YEARS AGO:) WE TALK ALL THE TIME SO ONE MISTAKE YOU ARE OUT I KNOW THERE IS A CHANCE HE MAY NEVER COME HOME I JUS WISH IT WAS A WAY TO CHANGE THE LAW I'M IN ILLINOIS AND SOME PEOPLE ARE GETTIN LIFE AND THEY ARE OUT IN TEN YEARS OR MORE :cool: DO IT DEPENDS ON THE STATE YOU ARE CONVICTED IN ON HOW MUCH TIME YOU DO DO LIFER W/OUT A OUT DATE GO UP FOR PAROLE?:blah: ANY INFO IS GREAT :confused:

Amy
08-29-2004, 04:37 PM
I agree with you totally. Everyone deserves a chance to live beyond their mistakes. It saddens me that we live in one of the most unforgiving countries in the world. (My opinion only of course).

DO IT DEPENDS ON THE STATE YOU ARE CONVICTED IN ON HOW MUCH TIME YOU DO DO LIFER W/OUT A OUT DATE GO UP FOR PAROLE?
It does to some extent depend on the state because the laws are different. A lot has to do with the judge though. He or she does have to follow the guidelines for sentencing, but he can also decide to suspend some of that time, or give a parole date. My husband was sentenced to the maximum for his crime, but the judge did suspend 12 years of that sentence. I see that as his second chance, but if he doesn't make good on his second chance, he will have to serve all the suspended time and probably more.

MrsWest11
08-29-2004, 04:51 PM
I agree with both of you! I am a person of second chances I guess you could say. Especially when the person in question commited the crime as a teenager...but, that is just my opinion. I personally think everybody deserves a 2nd chance...ya know? People make mistakes...we are all human.

huggs,
Selena

minniecas
08-29-2004, 11:55 PM
I agree with you. I believe that everyone should have a second chance. What good is it to put a young person in prison for life? If that person never did anything and that was the first time they got in trouble, they should have a second chance to show the world they have learned that crime doesn't pay......minnie:cool:

gentlemanbandit
08-30-2004, 12:32 AM
Absolutely yes...and maybe even more. Everybody makes mistakes. Some worse than others. I can't count the mistakes I've made. I'm one of those who always has to learn from my mistakes. Our system needs a make-over.

mz aundrey
08-30-2004, 09:47 AM
:angry: thanks for your input i really needed that it jus so hard to face that he may never come home because of one supid mistake life is so hard

Wifey2Bee
09-15-2004, 05:52 PM
Juveniles especially are "rehabitable" ( a word?). They have not developed fully intellectually, emotionally, spiritually and intellectually, yet our society treats them as adults. A juvie who has lived in the system his whole life become s institutionalized and I think that is a real crime!

mz aundrey
09-15-2004, 07:17 PM
thanks wifey i needed that i'm copiing slowing

coolchik4sure
09-15-2004, 10:15 PM
I personally believe that people go through changes their whole life. I am not the same person I was in my teens or my 20's. I have really changed numerous times in my life, and I would only hope I would not be judged the rest of my life for something I did in my earlier years. Even if it were a major mistake. I have made tons of mistakes, and I'm sure I will continue to make more b/c I am human, and I am trying to make the most of my life. I have known guys in prison for less than one year who I would not recognize if I did not know them personally. It doesn't always take 25 years to show people their mistakes.

Jenuwine
09-16-2004, 08:59 AM
Yes, they should be given second chances. I believe that a lot were a product of their environment and didn't know any other lifestyle then the one they were leading. I believe they can be rehabilitated, of course you always have a few exceptions in the bunch that are beyond rehabilitation but for the most part I think everyone deserves a second chance.

Retired-26
09-16-2004, 09:08 AM
yes they should!!! matt was a young violent offender and THANK GOODNESS he got off lucky! i thank my lucky stars for that daily. i am strongly for second chances. especially for teenage offenders!!

mz aundrey
09-16-2004, 01:04 PM
Yes I Agree But He Doin A Life Sentence In Federal Prison So That's Lowp Unless The Goverment Gets Friendly Lol We Are Woking On A Appeal Now Wish Us Luck Thanks For Your Support You Been Great I Could Have Done It Without You

Kebela1
09-17-2004, 05:22 PM
I believe that eveone deserves a second change. My son is considered a violent offender because he made one stupid mistake. Well, both boys in the car made stupids mistakes. They took a drink and tried to drive home. The tie rod on the car broke, the wrecked, and the boy in the passenger side died. My son has a perment brain injury and got 31 years to serve 12. Never been in trouble before and the family of the boy that died stood up for my son in court. He doesn't understand why he is in prison ,due to the brain injury, actually he thought he was in the hospital long after he went to prison. The judge said that he didn't show remorse at the trial, but he didn't even understand that he was on trial and his brain injury doesn't allow him to feel remorse or any other emotion for that matter. Because he had a drink before driving, he considered to have malice and forethought, so therefore is is considered a "Violent Offender" stuck under the 90% policy. He was 18 when it happened. He is going to be 21 in March. He is mentally is about 10. So.......YES, I think violent offenders deserve a second chance.

MsChiku
09-17-2004, 08:55 PM
Most definitely, YES. "He/She without any SIN cast the first stone." As we live we grow & mature. Everyone deserves a second chance! Our so-called Justice system, is seems so UnJust.

Alvarado
09-17-2004, 09:02 PM
I totally think that the juvenile's deserve another chance, my friend has been on death row since 16, he is a wonderful artist, he has totally turned himself around, he was 16 and was fighting for his own life since birth. It really is a sad system.

babs
09-26-2004, 08:18 PM
I think that we all make mistakes, and I think that everyone regardless of age, sex, creed, religion, or crime deserves a second chance. I think that without second chances we would all cease to be human.

MZachow
10-07-2004, 12:07 AM
I believe that eveone deserves a second change. My son is considered a violent offender because he made one stupid mistake. Well, both boys in the car made stupids mistakes. They took a drink and tried to drive home. The tie rod on the car broke, the wrecked, and the boy in the passenger side died. My son has a perment brain injury and got 31 years to serve 12. Never been in trouble before and the family of the boy that died stood up for my son in court. He doesn't understand why he is in prison ,due to the brain injury, actually he thought he was in the hospital long after he went to prison. The judge said that he didn't show remorse at the trial, but he didn't even understand that he was on trial and his brain injury doesn't allow him to feel remorse or any other emotion for that matter. Because he had a drink before driving, he considered to have malice and forethought, so therefore is is considered a "Violent Offender" stuck under the 90% policy. He was 18 when it happened. He is going to be 21 in March. He is mentally is about 10. So.......YES, I think violent offenders deserve a second chance.

Barbara that is so sad, how could the system be so cruel, your son should be home with you where you can take care of him, not in some place where he doesn't even know what he has done. What a cruel world we live in.. :(

Michelle Z.

bunnyrun5
10-07-2004, 07:02 PM
:rock: Yes, Yes yes! I agree that they should get a second chance. The system is so unforgiving. And the people who run it is mostly conservative and bias. They play the race card too which is why the prisons are busting with youthful offenders. It's genecide in a sense. No money for education, no money for the homeless or mental health services, but plenty of bank for wars and prisons! For shame....... :blah:

nadia_25
10-07-2004, 07:23 PM
Second chances are crucial to one's evolution. Without second chances we would all be screwed! I've made more mistakes that I can count, and I believe that " you are not your biggest mistake".

shiningdrum
10-14-2004, 02:32 AM
Same here. My husband was 16 when he got life. He was 15 when the crime was done. Over the years many changes have taken place. He was in hell from birth to 16. Prison is where he grew up and finally it is where he has matured and walked away from the things that brought him there. He has been clean and sober almost 12 years. He has returned to the Red Road and still he is considered a dangerous offender. I have been with him since I was 12, through the trial and still all these years later. I do not see what they say he is. My children have never seen it and even his PO of 7 years said the same thing. Sure does deserve a second chance!

Ebony's spice
10-14-2004, 05:49 AM
:no: WOW - I cannot believe what I'm reading here!!!! Sorry to be SO naive, but until reading this, I had no idea they could lock a 15 or 16 year old up for life w/o possibility of parole. I'm stunned and sick. This is insane - truly. When I think about who I was at 15 or 16, well, I'm not even the same person. What the hell were these judges thinking????

At that age, all your values, morales, principals, etc. are basically whatever you've taken on from your environment, family, friends, etc. You aren't even close to being "yourself" yet - or who you will turn out to be. Another thing I can't figure out is what are you going to learn in 20+ years of punishment that you can't learn in 10 years or 5 years?

I mean I'm so sick right now about this, that I want to ask what the crime was, but I know that's probably tacky and intrusive. I am seriously curious, because the only thing I can think of is premeditated murder. If they think the mind that committed the crime at 15 is the mind he has now, they don't know s#*t about adolescent/teenage brain development. There is absolute, factual information regarding what the brain is going through during this age and it is amazing. Maybe someone needs to be updated on the current brain research! I'm serious. I have tons of information on it if you would like. I find this absolutely sickening.

Another thing - the son that was brain injured.....that child does NOT belong where he is!!!! He belongs home or in a long-term residential facility or some alternative. I don't understand how that happened???? I thought you had to be capable of aiding in your defense. How could that possibly be???

I'm so shocked and angry right now, I could "spit nails" - in a few specific directions! Please tell me more about this, if you don't mind. I guess I've really been in the dark. I tend to spend a lot of time in the husbands/boyfriends forum and now that they have the option of just clicking on "new posts" (which is what I always do now), I have REALLY gotten an education! In fact, when I first starting reading PTO by the "new posts" option, I could'nt believe how much I'd been missing and how much information is really on this forum!

I understand these judges are trained in the law, but do they have any child development, "abnormal" psychology, or people skills AT ALL????

DJ'S BABYGIRL
10-14-2004, 08:00 AM
Definantly Yes!!!! My Fiance' Was Sentenced To A Minimum Of 20 Years When He Was 16. He Has Now Served Almost 10 Years. Everyone Deserves A Second Change Especially When They Are Teenagers.

2nice
10-14-2004, 08:25 AM
Yes, i believe in 2nd chances also. I think that it is inhuman to be loking up a teenager for a crime that he/she did for life!!

There was a much publisised casehere in the U.K., about two boys (aged 12 & 13 or something like that). They murdered a toddler by beating him to death. They were released after about 8 years. They were given new identities, a new own house, credit cards and everything. There were up roar over here over it. I dont believe that they should be given all that, but i do believe that they shouldve been released. Some say that they shouldnt have!

Brooks mom
10-14-2004, 08:39 AM
I agree with you all,everyone deserves a chance.These prisons are not rehabitating, they are making things worse,teaching crime & brutality.This country is past due for a total reform.NOW would be a good time to present this to politicians...

anotherday
10-24-2004, 01:39 PM
Everyone deserves a second chance. A second chance at life and loving the people around them.

I am wondering why "Illinois" is so unforgiving and harder on the crimes than some other states? :eek: Does anyone have an answer for this question? Just curious.

mz aundrey
10-26-2004, 09:51 AM
i think all states are unforgiving if you ask me because when they are young they try to lock them up for life i don't understand the legal system

impoohbearsgirl
10-26-2004, 12:28 PM
I think it depends on the nature of the crime personally as to any subsequent chances that should be given, even for young offenders. Some things are just heinous and shouldn't EVER be forgiven. Other things most definately SHOULD! Its not cut and dry for me unfortunately, every circumstance is different!

marcsbaby
10-26-2004, 12:43 PM
My baby was 16 when he got into a fight that turned bad, and someone he was with beat a guy to death....5 years later they decided to put my baby in prison for 5 years for it!!!!!!!!! He served from 16-18years old in the county til he posted a huge bond! Now he is 21 and had to go to prison for 3 1/2 yrs for something that happened when he was a 16 year old! Its the stupidest thing I have ever ever seen! I hope prison doesn't change him because he was the happiest person who loved life when he went in. It would be terrible if this took away his love of life, but I doubt it will cause he is so strong! Just thought I would tell yall how stupid my situation is!!!!!!!!!!
My answer is YES YES YES!!!!!!! Second chances!!!!!!!!!!!!!

shiningdrum
10-27-2004, 07:30 PM
Hi
I believe that young men and women have a host of things to overcome to come out into the world without problems or criminal activity. Almost 30 years working with young offenders, violent offenders and those society wants nothing to do with has taught me how wonderful most of those people are once they get the help they need and the compassion that society fails to give them all the way along.

Don't get me wrong. I am not a bleeding heart. I love ALL PEOPLE and my heart goes out to victims. However, the dynamic that leads to the chains of events that cause young people to do federal crimes is the legacy society has heaped upon them and with every one that goes to prison or dies, society has chalked up another failure for itself. I don't see society as some distant hMany young people never get a chance to make good. They grow up in violent chaotic environments filled with fear, abuse and usually drugs or alcohol (also a drug seldom understand as such). When they mess up its car stealing, fighting, drinking underage or theft, sometimes drug related offenses. Then the unthinkable happens and they end up taking someones life. I have worked with such youth and with the adults they will become.

Prison is worse than the environments that spawned the behaviour that tragically costs lives. What the person needs is one on one counselling, supportive and caring. They need to understand why they are as they are and they need to be given hope for a different future and the tools and opportunities to achieve such goals. Sadly the criminal justice system of Canada and the US does just the opposite. It houses the youth and then transfers them to adult prison where minimal counselling is done for long term offenders. Some luck out and find a way through without being badly damaged but must continue on the road that got them there. That is, violence, drugs, social isolation or gangs and then a funny thing happens. Once someone has been in awhile they learn to cope.. they do the time their way.

This is the beginning of istitutionalization. It calms them and the adjust but the adjustment is to such an unrealistic norm that they have little chance of readjusting when they get out. Our justice system is what creates the revolving door of prisons. Youth in trouble are still youth and should be treated as such. True some are violent and cruel beyond their years and we are quick to point to them and say toss the keys,fry them! The truth is we raised them, we allowed them to become who they are and we have a responsibilty to undo what damage has already been done let alone cause more damage.

This is the reason I support more than one chance for youth provided only one of the crimes is violent. Drugs are a trap that even adults fall into. If alcohol were illegal, how many adults would be in jail? It boggles the mind how we disrespect youth and treat them with the same disdain we give older adults whom have honed a lifetime of criminality. Yes they started as youth but if youth are not given the chance when young, we are DOOMED to create exactly what we seek to destroy.. that is, a hardened lifetime criminal. For my money even they need help because they came from what sends the youth to them. The circle is horrendous and we are all the more guilty for letting it continue.

Give youth second chances, but make them second chances that have supports that will help them change, grow and move on to happier more 'pro-social' lives. Even the worst of what society spawns has those who love them. Case in point, my husband. He is a lifer that went in at 16 for a crime committed at 15. Hes well into his 40s now. There is no justice in that. None whatsoever.
ShiningDrum

MsLynn
10-27-2004, 10:47 PM
we all need a second chance....

bethbupp
12-04-2004, 05:09 AM
First of all, yes, I think absolutely that young violent offenders should be given a second chance -- not automatically, but depending on their circumstances. Now, let me tell you why I have that opinion. I used to be a teacher of 15 to 21-year-old boys at a state prison in PA. I have personally met/ know pretty well/ and actually still keep in touch with more "young violent offenders" than most of you will ever hear of, and the same for lifers. In PA, you can get labelled "violent" for robbing a convenience store with a squirt water gun. I know a kid who was. My adopted son (that's the other point of view of my opinion!) robbed a drug dealer, using a gun, when he was 15. He had been taken from his biological mother when he was eight, ran away from every placement he was put in, and was basically raising himself on the streets of North Philadelphia/ Kensington. Not too many legal things you can do to support yourself at the age of 10, 11, 12, are there? I have seen those streets, met his bio relatives, and my son will tell you himself (not proudly, but openly) that he was the worst person in that area, at the age of 15. I met him when he was 18, halfway through seven years inside. Totally different person. He grew up, matured, and learned a different way of life. He paroled at 21, became a member of my family. His taught Vacation Bible School, got straight-A's in college, and his idea of a wild time was going down a water slide with his baby sister. They violated his parole because he hit back when someone punched him. He's been back inside for a little over a year now. All he wants is a chance to start his life and do something constructive with it. Whenever he manages to get out again, he will still be on parole until 2011, all because of something he did when he was 15, and didn't know any other way of life. Now from a staff point of view -- the lifers were usually the most pleasant inmates to work with. The kids who only had a couple of years to do on a drug charge never bothered to learn their lesson or adjust their attitude. A lot of them went right out and did the same thing over again after they left. We had a "boot camp" for juveniles coming into the adult program, and the state was embarrassed because a lifer graduated with the record high score from it. You see the program was supposed to be for rehabilitating the kids. The state couldn't possibly admit that a lifer had been rehabilitated. Now, not all lifers or "violent offenders" have metamorphed into model citizens -- some of them were pretty creepy. I still remember the young man who one of my students introduced me to. While high, he had thought a girl in a purple shirt was Barney, chopped her up in little pieces, and flushed her down the toilet. Yick! But on the whole, I would rather run into most of my lifer or "violent" students on the street, than some of their classmates who didn't have that label. :)

marcsbaby
12-05-2004, 11:30 PM
My baby was 16 when he was charged with first degree murder...he had 4 other co-defendants, and one of them got life without parole, one got 18 years, one got 8-10 years and Marc got 5-7 years....there is one left to be tried....after 5 years they still aren't finished. The one that got life I think deserved the time that he got becuase he did the crime, but the others were more or less just there and in our state you are guilty by association.... :( They were all 16-17 years old at the time and I think they deserve a second chance for sure.....especially the one who got 18 years for just being with this idiot!!! But that is just my two cents....thank God Marc didnt get that much time!
~Katie

Retired-17
12-06-2004, 03:19 PM
Oh my.


Yes, a young violent offender should be given a second chance. And a third. And a fourth, and a fifth. And not ONLY young offenders, but EVERY offender.


Humanity first, laws second.

marcsbaby
12-07-2004, 11:01 PM
Jay, as always....well put!

leenallie
12-19-2004, 08:46 AM
I think he deserves a second chance, I hate how foolish mistakes he made as a young man and bad judgement leave him with a life sentence. I know like someone else said I am not the same person I was at 20, he was 21 when he got into trouble and was sentenced at 26, now he is 34 with a Planet of Regret on His shoulders

Rusty265
12-26-2004, 09:52 PM
IMO-

YES. Depending on the nature of their crime, and how long their sentence is. It depends on what type of prisoner they are in my eyes...are they causing problems or are they presenting themselves as a model prisoner? That would have a lot to do with my decision.

Rusty265
12-26-2004, 09:54 PM
Oh my.


Yes, a young violent offender should be given a second chance. And a third. And a fourth, and a fifth. And not ONLY young offenders, but EVERY offender.


Humanity first, laws second.
You're absolutely right on "humanity first, laws second".:thumbsup: I hadn't quite thought of it THAT way, but thanks to your reminder...you are right.

Getsome
12-27-2004, 06:35 AM
How to win friends and influence people 101.:D This is not an attack on anyone. This is just my personal thoughts.

No. I don't. These are my reasons as to why.

From the age of about 1 year a child knows the difference between right and wrong and can adjust their actions according. If you tell a 3 year old not to do something then follow that up with either a time out, spanking, nap, whatever they will stop what they are doing because they don't like what follows. They might not understand the ramifications of disobeying you but they do know that it is wrong. Telling me that a 12-20 year old should get another chance after shooting someone or stabbing someone in a fight just doesn't make sense to me. They know the difference between right and wrong, and choose to disregard the law.

Coming from a bad home, divorced parents, drug infested neighborhood, etc.... does not give a get out of jail free card because you decided to carry a gun while selling drugs. If every person from a "broken home" turned to crime we would have more jails then Starbucks. Just because your 16 doesn't mean that you don't understand the consequences of your actions. At 18 you can vote, drive a car, serve in the military, but your not grown up enough to pay for your actions? Please! If you are a violent offender you have done a crime against another person and people(kids) have to be removed from society because they have proven that they can't control themselves so the courts have to intervene.

At what age do we say enough is enough? Men typically mature slower then women so now you can't prosecute guys till they are what, 35? If a 16-18 year old is doing LWOP someone is dead, and they deserve a second chance why? To possibly kill someone else? Just because 10 years into a 60 year sentence you "get it" shouldn't mean you deserve a second chance.
:grouphug:

marcsbaby
12-27-2004, 10:12 PM
Just because your 16 doesn't mean that you don't understand the consequences of your actions.

In case that was directed at Marc....He didn't know that they guy who committed the crime was gonna do it...He didnt know the guy was gonna kill someone, and no, the one who committed the crime shouldnt be given a second chance in this situation because he killed someone and screwed up 4 other peoples lives at the same time....But as for Marc....he should be given a second chance since he didnt committ a violent act in the first place....Just MY two cents....

Getsome
12-28-2004, 12:09 AM
In case that was directed at Marc....He didn't know that they guy who committed the crime was gonna do it...He didnt know the guy was gonna kill someone, and no, the one who committed the crime shouldnt be given a second chance in this situation because he killed someone and screwed up 4 other peoples lives at the same time....But as for Marc....he should be given a second chance since he didnt committ a violent act in the first place....Just MY two cents....
It wasn't directed at you and I would not think that he was a violent offender unless he took part in the assault. The person who posted that her son was listed as a violent offender when the car he was driving broke a TRE and his friend was killed and he is now impaired. If he had crashed the car because he was drunk I guess I might be able to see where he was charged as a VO but even that's getting into a grey area. I have a feeling that your boyfriend got the years he did because he either didn't(couldn't) stop someone from getting killed or left and didn't report it.

Lions Heart
12-28-2004, 11:00 AM
I have worked in a prison and I have seen people who just do their time and others who take advantage of the services offered in prison. I think that some people take steps to become better people and to mature and improve themselves. I believe that these people should be given a second chance. The question becomes in who is to judge who is putting forth the effort and who isn't. There are some people who can put up a good front and others who are sincere. How do you tell, that is the question.

Lions Heart
12-28-2004, 11:02 AM
I am currently involved with one of those young violent offenders who stabbed his father. Even those his father was abusive that does not excuse his actions at that time. What is important in my opinion is his actions currently and what I anticipate his morales and values to be when he comes home. That is why I love him now. He has values and morales and has matured and learned from his past and is a better person now as a result.

SCM32
01-05-2005, 10:48 PM
I feel like people especially young people should be given a second chance. They have to live and learn, and mistakes will be made in the process. But not a criminally insane young person or something like that. Those should go ahead and get locked up while they are young. :D

LisaL
01-07-2005, 06:34 AM
Well, in reading the posts here I have done alot of thinking. I do believe in second chances for young violent offenders. Although I do believe it depends on the crime. I also believe that teenagers know right from wrong. Alot of people do. I think that violent offender is too broad of a catagory. For instance, someone who was a drunk driver, had a lapse in judgement. But even that can be broken down, someone who has a record of DUI's and kills someone while drunk driving should be in a different punishment level than someone who hasn't. This is going to be long, sorry. In the case of accessories, to what level were they an accessory? Is having a lapse in judgement as to who you pick as friends or being afraid to tell on a friend that just killed someone, a violent person? But I certainly would not want the Barney hacker back on the streets again. I don't think you could ever take the chance with society that he would never do that again. I am not saying that people should not be held accountable for their actions, but sometimes the time is too high. And some should not be given any time. I know that this is off the subject, but it's the best analogy that I can come up with. I give money to people that I see standing on corners asking for money for food. My friends have told me "Why do you do that when they are only going to go buy drugs?" My response is that I don't know that that is what they are going to do with the money. It is possible. But how can I as a human turn a blind eye on someone who is in need, regardless of what they choose to do with my help. Now then if I were to see that same person walk into a liqour store right after and buy alcohol and then see them on the corner the next day, than I would no longer give that person another chance. Well I believe the same is true for alot of the people in the prison system. If you never try to give them a chance than how do you know that they would mess up with that chance? Also, I believe that the Justice System is like a parent to society. You all remember the give your child a time out based on their age. How 'bout give the amount of punishment that goes with what they have done. Because too much punishment is just as dangerous as too little punishment. Well the same holds true for the people in prison. If you give them too high a punishment then all you have taught them is to be bitter and given them an opportunity to meet people that they normally wouldn't have had contact with. Then you let them out and they are no longer able to vote and they have difficulties getting a job. Oh and forget a career. That more than likely isn't going to happen anymore. Their dreams are shattered and yet they are suppose to succeed where some who haven't been in prison have failed. Oh I could go on and on. I think I have made it somewhat clear where I stand on this. Thanks for listening to my rambling on of my opinions. Take Care and God Bless!
-Lisa

johnsbabygirl31
01-22-2005, 12:21 PM
well my fiance is 19 so I think that is young too and this is his 1st offense and just because there were guns at the house where he was that got raided he is considered a violent offender which I don't think is very fair that charge right there carries 5-life federal time so I do beleive they should be given a 2nd chance I know my fiance would never hurt a person

techietype
01-22-2005, 01:06 PM
Although I answered the poll question as yes, I was very tempted to answer maybe. Most of the time, probably 90% of the time I believe in second chances. That goes for adults as well as juvenile offenders. My problem is with people that fit a certain type of profile. Men who commit sexually motivated homicides are a real problem, because history has shown that they are very likely to reoffend. Basically, I am talking about serial killers. In some case, their pattern becomes apparent even when they are juveniles. As much as I hate to say it, I really do not think that they can ever be safely released into society.

Because giving the wrong offenders parole means that innocent people will die, I think that we have to be very careful about who gets released. We need to look carefully at how the people behaved in prison and give them through psychological screenings before they get released.

In the case of most homicides I agree that most offenders ought to be able to eventually win their release. I am well aware of a number of cases where people were imprisoned for crimes committed as a juvenile where I think that the sentence was way too harsh. I don't think that life without parole should ever be an option in a juvenile case. That doesn't mean that I think that every single juvenile offender who murders should eventually get paroled, but it should always remain an option.

haswtch
01-22-2005, 07:00 PM
Getsome, I don't think every kid gets anything like the kind of training you are describing. Some get the opposite- life sux, get what you can while you can. Some may actually learn to be grateful for that discipline when they do get it, use it to full advantage, and those people FOR SURE deserve another chance- a few people may be just too damaged to ever be safe, but I think those are the minority. I think a lot of young VOs suffer a lapse in impulse control that can be correctable with maturity, teaching, and time, and LWOP for them is a big waste. LWOP should be reserved for the unsalveageable predators, and it would help if prison itself were a less brutalizing environment. NO it should not be a country club, it's discipline- time out. But a lot of people with short bids come out worse than they went in which is inexcusable. And to say the young should pay for a lifetime for teenage mistakes, is to me like admitting that the system is bankrupt and cannot help anyone. So what do we do then? Kill em all and let God sort em out does not work for me (not saying it does for you either.)

jameslo
01-23-2005, 10:31 AM
Here's the kind of thing that drives the reluctance to introduce some people back into society after they've demonstrated that they have no regard for the lives or property of others.

I'm not saying that all people in for violent offenses would behave this way. But the problem is this... if a person has been convicted of murder, for example, and they are in prison, then they're no longer a threat to society. Allowing that person to mingle with society, knowing that they are a potential danger, and then for someone to be killed as a result of their early release, is an unacceptable risk to innocent people.

I don't think too many people (including my friend in prison) thought that what they did was Ok, legal, acceptable, etc. They thought they could get away with it and they rationalized their behavior in their own mind.

It's tragic what some people choose to do with their lives and the pain they choose to inflict on others for their own gain. For some, that second chance would be VERY eagerly accepted and positively acted on. I have no doubt that there are some in prison for a one-time use of horribly bad judgement that would never, ever do anything like that agaon.

The problem, though, is in identifying that person so that others don't suffer by releasing the wrong person.

One question to ask yourself might be... would YOU be responsible for what that person did after release? That is... a person is released because you say they're safe. They commit a crime that costs them 20 years in prison. Because you took responsibility, you go to prisin for 20 years, too. Period.

I'm sure you'd say 'yes I would' for YOUR OWN loved one. But the twist is, you are responsible for a total stranger's actions. You don't get to pick. If they get out and rob a store, YOU go in robbery.

That might seem to be a stretch, but with few exceptions, everyone in for a violent crime is a stranger to you, as they are to me. But everyone in has a family member that would probably say that their loved one is not a threat. Just as you might.

That being the case, and if they'd back their loved one as you might back yours, why would you not take the word of a stranger that their convicted loved one is safe? Wouldn't you expect them to back YOUR loved one?

Violent crimes are generally not a "mistake." Mistakes are unintentional outcomes. Loading a gun and heading out the door for the night doesn't accidentally happen.

That's the risk the "system" takes on releasing a person after 10 years who was sentenced to 30, for example. That's the "system" saying "this person is safe and we're giving him back to you." Because the system is responsible for the actions of those released early. God help "the system" if someone who was suppsoed to be in prison is allowed to get out and they harm a family member of mine. I'll hold them accountable, as you might.

http://www.forerunner.com/forerunner/X0158_Dukakis__Willie_Hort.html

Anj
02-01-2005, 03:17 PM
DEFINATELY!!! Especially if they are young when they first go in (18-25). Most people do a lot of growing (mentally) in that age frame, and especially after being in prison for a length of time... that will change people too.

JAElige
02-28-2005, 03:17 AM
I voted yes. I might be bias because my dude is in this exact situation, but I really do believe in second chances, especially when the crime is committed at such a young age. My guy was 16 when he went in. There was a big debate over whether or not to try him as an adult and in the end, he was. He was sentenced to 50, but got it reduced to 40. He grew up and became a man in there. Yes, he made mistakes, but I think they made another mistake by putting him in prison for so long. He's not even the same person anymore. Now all we can do is pray for parole...at least we have that!

Getsome
02-28-2005, 09:44 PM
I would be interested to see a poll of how many people are in prison right now for a first time offense. I'm taking about never been in county, never seen a judge, never been arrested peroid. If I had to take a guess I would bet 90% have some type of record before entering prison.

My point being that from what I have seen these people rejected society and it's laws long before "the man" layed the smack down on them.

Annette B.
02-28-2005, 09:52 PM
Yes, second chances are a must in one way or another. Me personally, am going thru everything I can for inmate that has been incarcerated since 18 years of age. His estimated release date stands at 2014 right now and he is 33. What a sad, sad world. Got to lock up youngins cause they are running out of adults and young people know no better. I bet everyone that makes these decessions have made their own little wrongs and got more than a second chance. They got us all up in the system one way or another.

marcsbaby
03-01-2005, 09:25 PM
I would be interested to see a poll of how many people are in prison right now for a first time offense. I'm taking about never been in county, never seen a judge, never been arrested peroid. If I had to take a guess I would bet 90% have some type of record before entering prison.

My point being that from what I have seen these people rejected society and it's laws long before "the man" layed the smack down on them.


Marc is in prison right now for a first offense....never been arrested, never seen a judge before, never had more than a minor speeding ticket...so I guess Getsome, he is in the 10% you are talking about
~Katie

Getsome
03-01-2005, 09:47 PM
How did I know that you would chime in here?:D After reading your other post about him getting moved to minimum security I would have to say that they agree that your "munchkin butt" is not a VO. After reading your other post about him getting moved to minimum security I would have to say that they agree that your "munchkin butt" is not a VO. So how about the other 39,191 people on here? Is my SWAG(scientific wild @ss guess) accurate of not?

marcsbaby
03-01-2005, 09:55 PM
I can't speak for the others here, but I do know an AWFUL LOT of people who have loved ones in prison for first time offenses....especially in NC where the Structured Sentencing is in effect...first time or not, you get a mandatory minimum for whatever you are convicted of....
~Katie

Getsome
03-01-2005, 10:56 PM
I just applied for a job in NC, so we might become neighbors.:)

RegisSweetness
03-04-2005, 06:21 PM
yes i think he should be given a second chance, especially since it happened when he was so young. im one that feels that once someone has served their time they should be able to have the chance to fit in with normal life. they should be allowed the chance to have a job and be able to live in the world normally. we all make mistakes and want to be forgiven, so what makes them any different?

and for getsome, my man is on death row on a first time offense for a crime that hes not even guilty of, so yes it does happen.

RegisSweetness
03-04-2005, 06:32 PM
:no: WOW - I cannot believe what I'm reading here!!!! Sorry to be SO naive, but until reading this, I had no idea they could lock a 15 or 16 year old up for life w/o possibility of parole. I'm stunned and sick. This is insane - truly. When I think about who I was at 15 or 16, well, I'm not even the same person. What the hell were these judges thinking????

At that age, all your values, morales, principals, etc. are basically whatever you've taken on from your environment, family, friends, etc. You aren't even close to being "yourself" yet - or who you will turn out to be. Another thing I can't figure out is what are you going to learn in 20+ years of punishment that you can't learn in 10 years or 5 years?

I mean I'm so sick right now about this, that I want to ask what the crime was, but I know that's probably tacky and intrusive. I am seriously curious, because the only thing I can think of is premeditated murder. If they think the mind that committed the crime at 15 is the mind he has now, they don't know s#*t about adolescent/teenage brain development. There is absolute, factual information regarding what the brain is going through during this age and it is amazing. Maybe someone needs to be updated on the current brain research! I'm serious. I have tons of information on it if you would like. I find this absolutely sickening.

Another thing - the son that was brain injured.....that child does NOT belong where he is!!!! He belongs home or in a long-term residential facility or some alternative. I don't understand how that happened???? I thought you had to be capable of aiding in your defense. How could that possibly be???

I'm so shocked and angry right now, I could "spit nails" - in a few specific directions! Please tell me more about this, if you don't mind. I guess I've really been in the dark. I tend to spend a lot of time in the husbands/boyfriends forum and now that they have the option of just clicking on "new posts" (which is what I always do now), I have REALLY gotten an education! In fact, when I first starting reading PTO by the "new posts" option, I could'nt believe how much I'd been missing and how much information is really on this forum!

I understand these judges are trained in the law, but do they have any child development, "abnormal" psychology, or people skills AT ALL????

i have a good friend who was 16 when he committed his crime and hes now about to be 34 years old still in prison for the crime he committed at 16. his sentence was 17 years to life, so hes done his 17 almost but that "life" part means he still may never come home. i think its unfair. how many 16 years olds are very rational thinkers? at 34 i know that we are not the sames person that we were at 16 mentally. i feel especially sorry for him because he learned how to be a man behind a prison wall, meaning if he did get out he would have no job skill or a clue at how to live his life. that would seriously set him up to go right back to jail if he doesnt have proper support from someone who cares for him or loves him. our justice system can sometimes be quite cruel. its really a sad thing....

RegisSweetness
03-04-2005, 06:33 PM

babygirl350
03-24-2005, 04:02 PM
I believe in second chances, we all make mistakes, true some more costly than others. There are so many that are innocent, to not be given another chance is ridiculous in my opinion.
A person who is incarcerated at such a young age and then spends, 10-20 yrs in prison certainly has changed.

As to your question about LWOP, it does depend on the state you are in. It is so different across the states. Even with LWP is different as to how much time they do, compared to their crime(s).

It is my opinion that sentencing guidelines be the same across the board. Then perhaps some would get to come home sooner.

Here it to second chances for everyone.

JKB's Girl
03-24-2005, 08:18 PM
I too believe in second chances for a young violent offender, I too am involved w/an inmate doing a life sentence for his offense committed at the age of 18. His also was a first offense, he had never been in trouble before.
Do I believe that he deserved to do time, absolutely. He has now been in for well over 20 years. He has made the most of the time that he has served, he is an accomplished and published artist. He has volunteered to speak to young people, to steer them away from where drinking and drugs took him. He has done everything that the system has asked him to do, yet he still sits behind bars.
Believe me, if given the chance, he will never re-offend. I know his mistake was huge, caused a great deal of pain to the family of his victim and his own family, but what does it serve to throw away his life as well. He has paid and paid and paid. If he could undo what he did, believe me he would in a heartbeat.
I don't believe that our society is helped any by an unforgiving attitude. Even our Lord saw fit to take men guilty of murder and make of them a mighty tool in His work. For those of you unfamiliar with the Bible, look at the stories of Moses, King David, and the greatest apostle of them all, Paul. These men did not commit their offenses in their youth but as full grown men, and are numbered among the greatest men in The Bible.
If our Lord saw fit to forgive these men, who are we to say that these men we are now discussing do not deserve a second chance.

MorenaRoa
03-28-2005, 08:51 PM
I totally understand where you are comming from three years ago my son's father got sentenced 20 years and more than likely he'll have to do 15 before being released:mad:. I do believe people should get a second chance but unfortunatley the ones that have already had a second chance and screwed up basically screwed it up for all othersl. From what I understand they base it on your prior record and the state does have alot to do with it I'm from Texas and Texas laws are screwed up.I HAVE A QUESTION SHOULD YOUNG VIOLENT OFFENDER BE PAROLABLE ? I PERSONALY BELIEVE IN SECOND CHANCES BECAUSE MY GUY HAS BEEN DOWN EVERY SINCE HE WAS 16 AND HE IS DOING 45-LIFE :nono: SO IS THAT LWOP NO CHANCE OF EVER COMING HOME HE WAS SENTENCE IN DC THEY HAD HIM IN STATE PRISON NOW HE'S IN FEDERAL SYSTEM HE'S BEEN LOCK UP FOR 9 YEARS :angry: I DON'T UNDERSTAND WHY THE SYSTEM DON'T GIVE THEM A SECOND CHANCE :eek: AFTER TEN OR MORE DON'T THEY THINK THAT CHANGE THEM I PERSONALY BELIEVE THAT HE IS A BETTER MAN NOW THAN 9 YEARS AGO:) WE TALK ALL THE TIME SO ONE MISTAKE YOU ARE OUT I KNOW THERE IS A CHANCE HE MAY NEVER COME HOME I JUS WISH IT WAS A WAY TO CHANGE THE LAW I'M IN ILLINOIS AND SOME PEOPLE ARE GETTIN LIFE AND THEY ARE OUT IN TEN YEARS OR MORE :cool: DO IT DEPENDS ON THE STATE YOU ARE CONVICTED IN ON HOW MUCH TIME YOU DO DO LIFER W/OUT A OUT DATE GO UP FOR PAROLE?:blah: ANY INFO IS GREAT :confused:

Dale'sforever
03-28-2005, 11:31 PM
Hi,
My husband was also a young offender and though he did not receive life, he is doing 15 years flat. I think that everyone deserves a 2nd chance and that the sentencing for juveniles should not be as harsh as it is. The sad thing is too, that alot of times when juveniles go to adult prison, they end up becoming a hard criminal and if they do not receive a life sentence, alot of them will end up spending most of their lives in and out of prison because they become "institutionalized" at such a young age.

Mike
03-29-2005, 03:43 PM
I definitely believe they should be given a chance. I have several pen pals who went in at age 16 or 17 for LWO. It makes me sick. Now I have a friend who went in at age 16, is now 33, and gets out in 2 years. His crime was extremely violent - kidnapping, stabbing, raping, then slitting her throat. He was on drugs at the time. When he gets out he will not be allowed to be in any houseway house that receives state funding. So where is he supposed to go? With his record he can't get an apartment or other things. So, even though he will get out he is not really being given a chance. I will be having him stay with me, even though I have some concerns. But I feel SOMEONE has to step forward and give him a chance. He will have 10 years parole. So after having served almost 20 years I don't see why he would do anything that would get him sent right back in. In over 2 years of writing he has never liked to me, never disrespected me, never asked me for a cent. If he didn't have me I am sure he would end up back in prison.

nikmom
04-22-2005, 02:50 PM
[QUOTE=jameslo]Here's the kind of thing that drives the reluctance to introduce some people back into society after they've demonstrated that they have no regard for the lives or property of others.

I'm not saying that all people in for violent offenses would behave this way. But the problem is this... if a person has been convicted of murder, for example, and they are in prison, then they're no longer a threat to society. Allowing that person to mingle with society, knowing that they are a potential danger, and then for someone to be killed as a result of their early release, is an unacceptable risk to innocent people.

I don't think too many people (including my friend in prison) thought that what they did was Ok, legal, acceptable, etc. They thought they could get away with it and they rationalized their behavior in their own mind.

It's tragic what some people choose to do with their lives and the pain they choose to inflict on others for their own gain. For some, that second chance would be VERY eagerly accepted and positively acted on. I have no doubt that there are some in prison for a one-time use of horribly bad judgement that would never, ever do anything like that agaon.

The problem, though, is in identifying that person so that others don't suffer by releasing the wrong person.

One question to ask yourself might be... would YOU be responsible for what that person did after release? That is... a person is released because you say they're safe. They commit a crime that costs them 20 years in prison. Because you took responsibility, you go to prisin for 20 years, too. Period.

I'm sure you'd say 'yes I would' for YOUR OWN loved one. But the twist is, you are responsible for a total stranger's actions. You don't get to pick. If they get out and rob a store, YOU go in robbery.



That being the case, and if they'd back their loved one as you might back yours, why would you not take the word of a stranger that their convicted loved one is safe? Wouldn't you expect them to back YOUR loved one?



That's the risk the "system" takes on releasing a person after 10 years who was sentenced to 30, for example. That's the "system" saying "this person is safe and we're giving him back to you." Because the system is responsible for the actions of those released early. God help "the system" if someone who was suppsoed to be in prison is allowed to get out and they harm a family member of mine. I'll hold them accountable, as you might.

http://www.forerunner.com/forerunner/X0158_Dukakis__Willie_Hort.html

That is EXACTLY what happened in 'our' case. The 'offender' had previously commited a violent crime......got out of prison EARLY due to his 'good behavior', and within a couple of months of his 'early release' (aka-second chance) he broke into an apartment an brutally murdered! 'HE' should never have been released -- had a second chance-- to commit the most violent of crimes. If he would NOT have had his 'second chance' then my loved one would still be alive today.

But, I also realize that NOT ALL offenders are 'this person'. Some have just made horrible mistakes, or used bad judgement. So, YES....there needs to be an adjustment made for offenders, regardless of age, but NOT necessarily all deserve a 'SECOND CHANCE'...or third, or fourth, or fifth!! (GOD FORBID)

[color=#0000ff]The Crime is very important, regardless of the age of the offender, but I also agree with the poster that wrote that even a toddler knows right from wrong. If you know something is wrong enough that is 'could' land you in jail.....get the ___ out of there!!!

one_luv
04-28-2005, 02:51 PM
THIS A SUPPORT FORUM FOR PEOPLE WHO HAVE LOVED ONES IN PRISON. iF YOUR PURPOSE IS NOT TO OFFER SUPPORT TO THESE PEOPLE, YOU HAVE NO BUSINESS POSTING.
To the people who answered No I would like to know how many violent offenders do you actually personally know? How do you now what goes on in their mind? What research have you done about young offenders? I would sincerely like to know if you have factual evidence to back your opinions with.

VO are people like any others. For so-called "christians', how can you claim to be a christian and not offer forgiveness? How can you give up hope on a child and say that they are incurable?

This is the problem with our country, so many people see our angry youth as "throwaways" and not products of our screwed up, violent, materialistic, urban enviornments. A young life is the most precious presence on this planet. We need to change the way we condemn them and start believing in our youth before change will come.

seansgram
05-12-2005, 10:58 PM
Oneluv- You Are Totally Right About This. I Agree With You 100%

Kebela1
05-13-2005, 08:15 AM
Someone used the example of a violent offended that was sentenced to like 30 years as an example. All I have to say is that my son was sentenced to 31 years. He had never ever been in trouble before. He and his friend were drinking, the tie rod broke on my car and they wrecked. The passenger died. Now I am not condoning the drinking. I don't believe in it, but my son has a severe traumatic brain injury. He will never drive again, have a wife or a "real job" , he will eventually live with us for the rest of his life and will never "hurt" anyone again. He was 18 years old when this happened. In the state of Georgia if you can state your name then you are competent to stand trial. He has no clue what is happening to him or why, but the judge decided to make "an example of him" He was sentenced to 31 years to serve 12. He has been classified as a violent offender because a car is just the same as using a gun. That is crazy! Someone with a gun pulls the trigger on purpose. They don't want to give him a second change because he is a "violent offender." The craziness is that he is in a prison, I visit as often as I can, but he thinks he is in a hospital. He doensn't have a clue. So tell me, what good to society is his being in prison classified as a violent offender doing?

babygirl350
05-13-2005, 05:14 PM
Someone used the example of a violent offended that was sentenced to like 30 years as an example. All I have to say is that my son was sentenced to 31 years. He had never ever been in trouble before. He and his friend were drinking, the tie rod broke on my car and they wrecked. The passenger died. Now I am not condoning the drinking. I don't believe in it, but my son has a severe traumatic brain injury. He will never drive again, have a wife or a "real job" , he will eventually live with us for the rest of his life and will never "hurt" anyone again. He was 18 years old when this happened. In the state of Georgia if you can state your name then you are competent to stand trial. He has no clue what is happening to him or why, but the judge decided to make "an example of him" He was sentenced to 31 years to serve 12. He has been classified as a violent offender because a car is just the same as using a gun. That is crazy! Someone with a gun pulls the trigger on purpose. They don't want to give him a second change because he is a "violent offender." The craziness is that he is in a prison, I visit as often as I can, but he thinks he is in a hospital. He doensn't have a clue. So tell me, what good to society is his being in prison classified as a violent offender doing?

This is a very sad case indeed. I am so sorry for your pain and for his. It is terrible that the laws are as they are now. It should have been at the most vehicular homicide. A violent offender, definitely not.

Of course you don't condone drinking and driving. I don't think anyone who drinks and drives decides to go out and have a wreck and kill or injure someone. He was 18yrs old and yes he should have known better, but that still doesn't excuse the system for imposing this sentence on him.

For him to believe he is in a hospital and not a prison is so very sad. I feel your pain and I am so sorry for the two of you and your family as well.

I never knew stating one's name makes you competent to stand trial. How terrible. Just ridiculous.

Just my thoughts. Better days ahead to all of you.

Kebela1
05-14-2005, 04:14 PM
Thank you for your kind words. It has been rough, but we will get through it with God's help and the support of all the wonderful members of the PTO.

kayos-grl
05-18-2005, 06:59 AM
I think yes they should be given a second chance. My man did what he did when he was 16. He is 24 now. Nowhere near the same as he was back then. As a teenager we do so much stupid stuff. It is really sad because unless things work out with this appeal he will be 49 when he comes home.

inquistive
06-01-2005, 04:25 PM
Of course everyone should be given a second chance. Think about it. When you are young you tend to do a lot of stupid things without thinking about consequences. If I would have gotten caught for all of the stupid things I did while growing up I would be in the same situation as soo many people here are. But like someone else said, it depends on the state b/c my honey was in cali and was involved in a shooting and in alabama where i live the same thing happend. In Cali he was sentenced to 42 years to life and in alabama they were sentenced to 2 years and are already out. not to mention the fact that my honey was only 18 and they were grown a%^ adults. Now how does that make sense? It's quite sad that the laws very from state to state like that.

CTemen-Mojica
06-21-2005, 07:57 PM
Most definately he diserves a second chance. I am in a similiar situation as you my husband was 14 and was sentenced to 9-life. He has served 15 years and has been denied parole at 4 parole board hearings. We have a cruel and inhumane legal system. Keep your head up.

vondegross
07-01-2005, 01:33 AM
I have three sons! and the thought that they could make a mistake and pay with a life behind bars is like the scariest thing ever:slap: if they are not really a bad child when it happens they will be by the time they get out! I did a essay in college over this same subject! it makes me sick :yuck:


I HAVE A QUESTION SHOULD YOUNG VIOLENT OFFENDER BE PAROLABLE ? I PERSONALY BELIEVE IN SECOND CHANCES BECAUSE MY GUY HAS BEEN DOWN EVERY SINCE HE WAS 16 AND HE IS DOING 45-LIFE :nono: SO IS THAT LWOP NO CHANCE OF EVER COMING HOME HE WAS SENTENCE IN DC THEY HAD HIM IN STATE PRISON NOW HE'S IN FEDERAL SYSTEM HE'S BEEN LOCK UP FOR 9 YEARS :angry: I DON'T UNDERSTAND WHY THE SYSTEM DON'T GIVE THEM A SECOND CHANCE :eek: AFTER TEN OR MORE DON'T THEY THINK THAT CHANGE THEM I PERSONALY BELIEVE THAT HE IS A BETTER MAN NOW THAN 9 YEARS AGO:) WE TALK ALL THE TIME SO ONE MISTAKE YOU ARE OUT I KNOW THERE IS A CHANCE HE MAY NEVER COME HOME I JUS WISH IT WAS A WAY TO CHANGE THE LAW I'M IN ILLINOIS AND SOME PEOPLE ARE GETTIN LIFE AND THEY ARE OUT IN TEN YEARS OR MORE :cool: DO IT DEPENDS ON THE STATE YOU ARE CONVICTED IN ON HOW MUCH TIME YOU DO DO LIFER W/OUT A OUT DATE GO UP FOR PAROLE?:blah: ANY INFO IS GREAT :confused:

lilithinwaiting
08-14-2005, 01:07 PM
Everyone deserves a second chance.

MamaSheila
08-14-2005, 02:08 PM
I think anyone should be given a second chance.:yes:
Love, Sheila

kim9154
08-14-2005, 05:36 PM
I do believe in 2nd chances when you are 15-21 you think you are superman no one can touch you. yes you know right from wrong but you do not have an adult mind. and they classified my son as a violent offender he commited burglary. he and his friends always knocked on the door watched the house to make sure nobody was home. he would never hurt a person. at age 19 he will now lose 6 years of his life.

hatra2
08-19-2005, 03:04 PM
This is a hard situation. On one hand you have the victim, and unless you were close to the victim, you have no way of understanding how they feel. I believe if the offender has served a considerable amount of time behind bars, and displayed excellent behavior, and also been seen by numerous doctors who agree that they are psychologically okay, then yes they deserve a second chance. There are so many young people behind bars who committed violent crimes at a young age who will never get a second chance and who have truly learned a lesson being incarcerated. If these young people end up serving forty and fifty years behind bars, they will never lead productive lives because they are institutionalized, and there is a good possibility they will end up back where they came from. There should be more programs that help individuals, especially young ones rehabilitate, instead of locking them up and throwing away the key. Maybe these people did not have anyone there for them to tell them what was right or wrong. Maybe they did not have anyone there to show them love. If we don't give them the opportunity to prove themselves they will end up becoming victims themselves. Victims of the system.

Doc's Sis
08-27-2005, 06:42 AM
IMHO, judges don't bother to get all of the facts/details and simply sentence people without doing the research on them. Each case probably has different factors that should be considered. My family member was convicted of murder and judge refused to listen to very important info - that he lied about it to cover for a friend (bad decision)... All the judge cared about was that a man died and someone had to pay for it. Period. Thus, he ordered the maximum sentence!

Some people including teens, will never ever be rehabed because they have very serious emotional problems. Other people can be rehabilitated and get out and lead very good lives. Our system doesn't allow for each case to be judged individually. If they would do that, a whole lot of people would be much better off!!

Jillian
09-06-2005, 02:56 AM
i believe in second chances

Silva
09-06-2005, 11:21 AM
Two things strike me with this: 1) the threat of life imprisonment is not a deterrent, and 2) parole is not used as effectively as it could be.

Going just on what I've read on this thread and through PTO, I would guess that very few VO made the distinct decision to hurt someone. They didnt wake up one morning and say to themselves, I'm going to hurt Mr X today. It rarely happens like that, but for the cases where it does, then I'd be reluctant to sanction parole after only a couple of years no matter what the age of the offender. It seems that most VOs represented here, were in the wrong place at the wrong time, got caught up in a rapidly escalating chain of events, and at that point the ability to step back and think is greatly diminished. Then there are those who at the time, or since, suffered some kind of mental episode. These are the ones I feel should be looked at more carefully by the parole boards.

I read elsewhere recently that in Tx, each parole file gets an average of 45 seconds when it comes to being reviewed, because of the volume of files that need looking at. That is simply not good enough. Mandatory time served rules are as useful as the life sentences themselves, they are no incentive to anyone to make changes in their behaviour. One post mentioned the words 'potential offender' ~ we are ALL potential offenders given the appropriate circumstances.

Second chances should be available to most, but if you mess up again, then you get a serve all. That's how I'd run it.

Tepee
09-26-2005, 08:50 PM
My guy was 18 when he was sentenced to 17 years for attempted murder. Did he deserve to be where he is? Yes, but not at the risk of losing a life time. He was 18 years old thrown into a prison with MEN, men who are all very prison political and all most of them teach is how to survive as a lifer. This is a really hard topic for me because, no I didn't know the victim but I know the culprit and I think being 18 you have so many things in life that you want to experiance, good or bad and a lot of the times we don't make the right choice but it doesn't mean we should be punished for it for a life time. I totally believe in second chances and if our judical system could actually take into account the efforts some of our inmates are making maybe they too will believe in a second chance.

mrschris
10-03-2005, 12:19 PM
i believe that juveniles deserve a second chance, definitely. as for adults beyond 25, i believe that it really depends on the situation, and the offense(s). from personal experience, many (and i mean MANY) prisoners are itching at the bit to be released just to get back to the life that put them there initially. they know how to manipulate and lie their way to freedom, both through using the system and personal relationships, and know FULL and well that they are just doing the things they do and behaving a certain way to get back to their negative lifestyles. and while i believe our system is very unfair as well, i can't help but to notice that so many young offenders (under 35) continually put themselves in jail regardless of HOW many chances they are given. this is one huge reason why second chances in the prison system are becoming harder and harder to find. i've seen some guys (even my own hubby) take advantage of chance after chance they were given, going right back to the life they left for jail. and when i say take advantage, i mean...i've seen inmates get 3 months in jail for a 5 year charge, get released, do the EXACT same thing again, come back to jail, get sentenced to 6 months this time (maybe they'll learn this time), get released, and go BACK to jail for doing TWO more crimes in addition to doing the same crime they were arrested for before this time. it's sad, but true, and cannot be ignored. either they have it in them to make the change or they don't. all things start with self. i used to tell hubby all the time, "if you were smart enough to pull off some of the things you did, smart enough to get so many things from living as a criminal, then you're smart enough to make a change and become the man you were meant to be." he's never taken those words lightly, thank God. i see changes in him that would never be possible had he not truly wanted it from the bottom of his heart. i see alot of men complain of how no one helps them change for the better...but i also say to them, "well no one is forcing you to do the things you do, especially when much of it isn't neccessary to your basic survival. if you want to change, you go out and make it happen. change isn't handed to us on a silver platter." so i believe that those who truly want a change deserve a chance. the rest of them will be back to prison life eventually, so no change is headed their way...the only way to determine which is which is to wait and see. and unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on which side you sit), the justice system has little patience.

mrschris
10-03-2005, 12:30 PM
Two things strike me with this: 1) the threat of life imprisonment is not a deterrent, and 2) parole is not used as effectively as it could be.

Going just on what I've read on this thread and through PTO, I would guess that very few VO made the distinct decision to hurt someone. They didnt wake up one morning and say to themselves, I'm going to hurt Mr X today. It rarely happens like that, but for the cases where it does, then I'd be reluctant to sanction parole after only a couple of years no matter what the age of the offender. It seems that most VOs represented here, were in the wrong place at the wrong time, got caught up in a rapidly escalating chain of events, and at that point the ability to step back and think is greatly diminished. Then there are those who at the time, or since, suffered some kind of mental episode. These are the ones I feel should be looked at more carefully by the parole boards.

I read elsewhere recently that in Tx, each parole file gets an average of 45 seconds when it comes to being reviewed, because of the volume of files that need looking at. That is simply not good enough. Mandatory time served rules are as useful as the life sentences themselves, they are no incentive to anyone to make changes in their behaviour. One post mentioned the words 'potential offender' ~ we are ALL potential offenders given the appropriate circumstances.

Second chances should be available to most, but if you mess up again, then you get a serve all. That's how I'd run it.

i totally agree with you here Silva!!!

the problem ISSSSSSSS (there's always a BUT lol)...that as human beings running a system full of thousands of people in and out daily, "clumping" is done. there is no way to fully view each inmate and make a decision based on the individual factors, and not a general scope or guideline. so there is no way to avoid grouping people to help the process go faster. you know money is the root of all evil, and these days, everyone seems to want their money, regardless of what type of job they do. we as individuals do this on a daily basis. this is the root of racism and prejudice in our society. also, when inmates who are given second chances ruin them, they make it more difficult for others to get second chances. just like when some get into a bad relationship, every person that comes after the bad apple has to suffer. it's human nature. and the system was created by humans, we will always be the root of the system.

again, i totally agree. second and third chances should only be given to some, not all, especially not to those who just are blatantly not trying to change (and there are alot of people like in the world unfortunately). i told hubby, "your judges were way more merciful on you than i would ever be. you mess up once, it's a mistake. twice, it's a coincidence, three times, it's a habit, and you have to go." blunt, but it's the way i believe in. he's been given 10 chances to change his life (he's been given the lightest sentences for some pretty hefty charges before), and he's failed again and again. this one is the first, and final, one with me.

its me
10-03-2005, 01:47 PM
i belive everyone has the ability to CHANGE its all about being given the CHANCE to do so....

galgrif
10-15-2005, 12:28 AM
I read on MSN a couple of days ago that we have 2500 juveniles spending life sentences. It is rediculous, they probably never had a chance. Granted, they made mistakes or they wouldn't be there but what is this country coming to? We offer everything to everyone but we won't offer possibilities to our own kids?

robs_angel
10-15-2005, 03:51 PM
YES YES YES , i agree, my hubby to be is a violent offender, he was 16 now is almost 20, he has had his poems , published, and writes songs, and a wonderful artist, he has drew most of my tattoos, he made a mistake and is paying for it, and is sorry, and has turned his life around he is doing 10-35yrs he has 7 yrs left to see parole all we can do is pray witch i do a hundred times a day . he only has to do 14 total, before he is discharged if the parole comm. says no, i miss him so much

Sarah Moats
robs_angel

nakida
10-29-2005, 08:14 PM
Hi there,
Well.......I have spoken out on behalf of our juveniles serving life in prison. I think the whole idea of putting a baby behind bars for life is politically driven by DA's who want to make a name for themselves. I will say however, that there are a few cases in which I do agree with a VERY stiff punishment (such as one being the columbine case....they would have). I feel that who are WE/THEY to determine when a child is a child? We can say "Try them as an adult" yet we say "Hey their to young to vote/smoke/drink/drive". That is such crap!!! I know that I was considered a "troubled" youth. I am now an Officer for my home state, and doing very well for myself. What happened? Oh I grew upppppppppppppppp......My favorite color growing up was pink, now its green. My favorite flavor was strawberry, now I'm a chocoholic lol. Children dont understand the chain of events when they commit such horrible crimes. Why arent we considering a locked facility with therapy until they reach adulthood? Why is society so quick to tag a child as a "throw away kid"? We arent solving a problem we are TRYING to conceal one. I compare the Government to be a "drunk". Without acknowledging a problem, we cant fix it. I dont know about alot of people, but I have argued my point over and over again. We need to educate, to help and to recognize the problems that we face. Until we begin to do this, we are breeding children to become either victims/perpertrators to others, or to the Government. Now, on the other hand? I am not speaking for adults on this, I am only speaking on children. I know their are some cases out there, that maybe someone got a harsher punishment than they should have. However, I feel if an adult is going to do something horrible, then the issue is way different than dealing with a child.
Sorry......just had to speak my peace........I am pissed lol
Tam

LenaInVA
11-04-2005, 09:52 AM
It has been proven that the brain does not fully develop until around the age of 25 (for males) and 23 (for females). Specifically, the area of the brain that controls the ability to be rational and use logic, as well as impulse control.

I believe it is not only WRONG to incarcerate juveniles for life or long sentences, I believe it is cruel. Most of these supposed violent offenders who are juveniles are FULLY capable of rehabilitating their BEHAVIOR and learning new coping skills for stressful situations. Of course, there are the few who are just so messed up they will probably continue to be criminals, but, I still believe they are worth the effort of trying to rehabilitate them.

When I read about children as young as 8 and 10 years old being charged as adults for murder, etc., it makes me crazy. It's just so beyond logic, it makes me wonder if these juveniles will be able to reason and use logic before the judges and DA's ever will.

Snowhite1
11-21-2005, 11:49 AM
I wish that my son could get a second chance...he was 17 at the time he committed his violent offense, and he was under the influence of drugs as well as being guided by a very "twisted" mentor. My son is serving 40-life but I really think that because of his offense he will never get parole after serving his minimum 40 years. He will be institutionalized and that will be the "response".
I remember telling my children that sometimes life doesn't give you second chances. As much as I love my son and miss him, and wish that everything could be different I'm conflicted about whether he should ever get parole because I feel so horrible that there is one victim, I know I could not live through this if someone else was harmed. That makes me feel very guilty as a mom, but I just don't know if his freedom is worth the risk to someone elses life. Does anyone have any thoughts or struggles with that?

nakida
12-02-2005, 11:31 AM
Well..........as a victim at the age of 15....my mother was brutally murdered. As a kid, not ALLOWED to talk about her mother (becuz it was a sore subject with my fathers new wife) I had no one to talk to. Instead......I became a violent offender. Now......I never killed anyone, but i did stab my father, randomly attacked people just for "fun". Now as an adult.......it was not the "fun" part that was reality. It was the fact that I was angry, and had "no other way" to vent it. I can tell you that in my case (and I am not the only one out there) I was a kid trying to release my emotions in the wrong way. Did I know that at the time? No!!! Did I think rationally? Um no.....I didnt know what rational was. I was alone, afraid, and very fearful of many different things. I didnt know how to respond in a more appropriate way. I was taught violence was the answer, and solution to everything. We have so many kiddos out there that are going thru the same thing. Putting a child in prison for life is not the answer. Its sick and distorted, and just allowing them to be further violated. If a child commits a crime, yes there should be severe consequences...........but where is the HELP that they need? I have seen children get locked up for 20 years or so.....and in some cases yes that is valid. However, why put them in the ADULT system at that age? Why not some sort of treatment facility until a more mature age? Then move them on? Does the system know what its like to take a child and put them in prison yet segregate them until they are older? They go crazy that way. They begin to cut,mutilate.......they lose a sense of themselves, they become reclusive...........Why dont we see that we are being just as violent as they have been? UGHHHHHHHHH

My ChRiStOpHeR!
12-02-2005, 11:41 AM
yes they should get a second chance but they must prove it and enroll in class is what I think my hubby had an anger prob when he drank he just always tried to fight someone that scared me. He is taking some kind of drug Alcohol class in Middleton. He also promised me he would go to AA and Anger Management just so he wont be Tempted. right now he is paying for the things he did when he was 18 he is now 23 so yes they should be punished for what they did but 45 to life is pushing it on a 16 year old.

JohnsHeart
01-04-2006, 03:34 PM
yes, they should be given a chance
To sentence a first time offender at 15 years old to life without parole .. how is that helping him?