View Full Version : What does parole board really look at


nanny11
06-03-2012, 12:13 PM
My son wont be elidgiable for parole for a little while, But I want to know what they look at. What goes against them adn what helps them? Do they look at there original charge or do they look at what there current charges are (say they were charged with one think but it was taken down to a lesser charge), I know I'm jumping the gun so to say, but I want to know, I want us all to be prepared if that is possiable.

canadiangirl098
06-03-2012, 01:01 PM
im not sure what they look at either...maybe the crime that they have done in the past plus the one he is in for maybe look at how he has done while in jail and whether they think he will reoffend if he is out on parole or hang around with the same people or not also whether he is living in the same city where the crime happened plus if he is told by parole board to make appointments while in jail for if he gets out on parole then he has to do that..my guy has to make an appointment with his family dr now even though he is still in jail before his parole hearing that is the one thing they want him to do before the hearing so they might ask your son to do something similar plus he will have to follow the rules that they give him if he is let out on parole because if he doesnt then he will go back to jail until his sentencing is done

thisfamily
06-03-2012, 03:06 PM
Google self support letters and support letters to parole board. The info will tell you what they are 'looking' for.

CenTexLyn
06-03-2012, 04:48 PM
Panels in different States are going to look at different things. In a nutshell, when I reviewed cases, I was looking at the entirety of the criminal history as well as institutional adjustment in addition to past performance on supervision at both the felony and misdemeanor levels. To be honest, the components of the release plan were low on the list...especially in those cases where someone had been locked up for a prolonged period of time. For those with drug or alcohol histories, one of the other variables I took into account was how long that they had stayed free from injurious habits.

Purpleorchids
06-04-2012, 09:12 AM
Your son should take advantage of ALL the classes that he is offered at his institution. Through counselors there, he can also ask to be transferred, because quite often the classes they most want to see (AOP for "violent" offenders) is only offered at certain locations. Completion certificates from classes will help. This is one thing I know will make some difference. All the best to you and your son.

Scott
06-04-2012, 12:01 PM
In a broad sense, here are the things the Parole Board will look at. it includes, but is not limited to some or all of the following:

The original crime, as well as the crime one pled to and was found guilty of.
The history of the person. Although our history is not necessarily our destiny, the parole board will weigh whether or not there are other factors in the individual's history which show a pattern of a certain kind of behavior.
The motivation of the person to change - this relates to what another poster wrote about taking classes, participating in groups, etc., etc., all of which can reflect a sincere desire to change and to develop the skills one needs to navigate the difficult world outside of prison. Every opportunity in prison, and there are many, should be explored.
An effective parole plan. This is an important one. Every parole board wants to know that the individual has a realistic, possible plan. That includes post-prison employment, a play for housing, education, etc., etc. If alcohol or drugs was involved in the original crime, a plan for how the individual plans to deal with (or continue dealing with) those issues

These are some of the things that a parole board will look at. Although - the scope of what a parole board can and cannot do varies widely from State to State.

CenTexLyn
06-04-2012, 07:07 PM
An effective parole plan. This is an important one. Every parole board wants to know that the individual has a realistic, possible plan. That includes post-prison employment, a play for housing, education, etc., etc. If alcohol or drugs was involved in the original crime, a plan for how the individual plans to deal with (or continue dealing with) those issues



A release plan is often NOT the most important thing under consideration. As I noted, it really was one of the LEAST important things I looked at when making decisions. Few people coming out actually have employment lined up nor do they have much in the way of realistic expectations coming out of prison. There are lots of 'pie in the sky' sorts of things people put into their letters to the Board but without the means to carry them out. Letter offers of employment were often from 'friends' who claimed to have businesses that were not even registered with the Comptroller of Public Accounts for tax purposes. I was much more inclined to pay attention to that sort of thing if they provided proof of registration of the business with the State...

Housing is often an address to come out of prison and into, but from the first day on the streets, a request can often be made to field staff to change addresses elsewhere. Yet another reason why the plan included in the file at the time of the vote is not something with a lot of weight put on it...

chiclet
06-06-2012, 07:20 PM
Tell him to take all the classes and self help groups he can get. He will have to explain how he knows himself well enough to make a successful change. AA and NA will help him get to know himself even if drugs or alchohol were not his problem. If he can take yoga, tell him to take it. You never know what will be the best help but the more certificates of completion that he can show, the more it looks like,he is trying.

Purpleorchids
06-11-2012, 12:56 AM
Taking advantage of everything, and maintaining a good record throughout are what can lead to the institutional changes (camp enlistment) that may provide him with more opportunities before ERD or parole hearings. Today is the hearing. Today is the hearing. Tell him to become his own advocate, in the best way he can be. Learn his options.