View Full Version : Correspondence Courses for Inmates


Peggylost
03-19-2012, 02:52 PM
I hope I have put this in the correct place. I don't see anything about inmates being able to continue their education while incarcerated. I have a daughter at Southern Correctional in Troy, NC that is interested in taking some correspondence courses. She was very close to having her BA before she got in to trouble with drugs. Now she wants to finish her education.

Can anyone offer any advice as to what schools offer courses through the mail and if anyone has had any experience with any schools?

Thanks,

Peggylost:)

2021
03-19-2012, 11:36 PM
I did a quick check in Google for Correspondence Courses for Inmates and it came up with several links: Phoenix.edu, Kaplan.edu, Walden.edu/correspondence, CollegeGuid.org, and even a link to a PTO archive http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-54695.html

Her Case Manager should have some local information or at least some colleges that deal with NC Inmates.

uncc23
07-24-2012, 02:26 AM
I hope I have put this in the correct place. I don't see anything about inmates being able to continue their education while incarcerated. I have a daughter at Southern Correctional in Troy, NC that is interested in taking some correspondence courses. She was very close to having her BA before she got in to trouble with drugs. Now she wants to finish her education.

Can anyone offer any advice as to what schools offer courses through the mail and if anyone has had any experience with any schools?

Thanks,

Peggylost:)

I just got out in march and what they have is correspondence courses through the friday center at unc chapel hill. they are free all he has to do is ask his case manager for the catalog to sign up. you can only take one a a time though here is link (wont let me post)

here is copy and paste from link
Correctional Education
The North Carolina Department of Correction works with UNC-Chapel Hillís Friday Center for Continuing Education to provide a variety of tuition-free university courses and educational services to inmates. Only those incarcerated in the North Carolina prison system qualify for the Correctional Education Program.

Since 1974, 167 participants in Correctional Educationís on-campus study-release program have earned college degrees, including three doctorates and eighteen master of arts or master of science degrees. Many have gone on to thrive in professional jobs. The recidivism rate of study-release participants is only 7 percent.

Who is Eligible?
Incarcerated individuals must meet academic and sentence criteria for eligibility. The academic criteria are a GED score of at least 250, a WRAT reading grade level of at least 10.0, or prior college (or community college) academic credits. The sentence criteria exclude all Class A and Class B felons, as well as other adult offenders whose parole eligibility and discharge dates are more than 10 years in the future. The 18- to 25-year-old individuals funded by Federal Youth Offender Act grants must be within five years of parole eligibility or discharge date.

The Procedure
Qualified inmates should contact a Programs or Education staff member, preferably their case worker, at their correctional facility

to confirm that they qualify to take low-cost (postage only) Self-paced Courses and no-cost on-site classroom courses
to obtain the registration form for Self-paced Courses
for instructions on how to apply for and schedule a Self-paced Courses final examination to be administered at the prison
in minimum custody facilities, for information about on-campus study release opportunities and requirements.
Self-paced Correspondence Courses
Inmates can take correspondence courses in the Friday Centerís Self-paced Courses program. These courses have a nine-month enrollment period. A renewal of four months is available for a $30 fee (paid by the Correctional Education Program). A second four-month renewal is available in some circumstances, but the $75 second-renewal fee is not covered by the Correctional Education Program.

On-site Classroom Courses
On-site classroom courses for college credit are currently offered at approximately twenty-five participating North Carolina correctional facilities during the fall, spring, and summer terms. As with campus courses, each course consists of forty-five total classroom hours. Class sessions consist of fifteen three-hour classes, either one evening a week (for fifteen weeks) or two evenings a week (for seven and a half weeks). The final examination in on-site courses is given by the instructor during the last class of the term.

Transferring Credits
Credits for self-paced and on-site classroom courses taken through the Correctional Education Program are transferable to other colleges, universities, and community colleges that offer an equivalent course, as long as the student has a final course grade of C or better.

For More Information
Brick Oettinger
Associate Director for Correctional Education
oettinge@email.unc.edu

trust
09-07-2012, 07:20 PM
There are education opportunities, but depending on the state and facility will determine what is available. We are in California, which offers a Board of Governor's Waver (BOG) for inmates interested in taking general education or gaining a certificate at the community college level. Coastline Community College (http://dl.coastline.edu) in Irvine is the corresponding college. The inmate will need to find out who the education liaison is for the courses. As for upper division courses, Ohio State University (http://www.ohio.edu/ecampus/future/cpi.htm) offers an inmate program. This program is not free, although tailored for inmates to work towards a Bachelor degree. As for other states, I do not have a wide span of knowledge.

There is also a program called Inside Out (http://www.insideoutcenter.org) which provides "in-class" instruction. A local professor goes into the facility with 15 students, then 15 inmates are selected to participate in a semester course. The topics will depend on the speciality of the professor. The inmates have an opportunity to interact with actual students and benefit from having a professor 3 hours each week. One of my previous professors is in the process of getting this program into the CA prisons. Right now, San Quentin is the only facility in CA that permits the program. Oregon, Pennsylvania, and others that I do not recall also have this program.

I hope this helps!

JesseF
09-19-2012, 12:39 PM
Peggy, It's awesome your daughter wants to finish her degree, in spite of her setback.

A provider of some impressive self-help correspondence courses for inmates is InmateLifeskills.com. They are working on getting some colleges to give credit for them, but don't offer that as of now. Their focus is to help the offender overcome the thought habits that landed them in prison in the first place.

I've seen some of their evidence that their program reduces re-incarceration - pretty dramatic drops in recidivism.

Jesse