View Full Version : What is the Percentage of habitual offenders changing their life around?


breesky33
09-30-2011, 12:05 AM
For many, this is not your man or womans first time being incarcerated. I been trying to research the percentage rate of men and woman changing their life around for the better but unfortunately have not had any luck. So i want to ask you here registered on Prisontalk about your own personal opinions on what percentage do you think that men can change their life around when they have been doing it (breaking the law) for the majority of their life? Or personal stories of seeing people change would be GREAT too. Thank You! -Breesky

decoprincess
09-30-2011, 12:17 AM
National Reentry Resource Center (http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/)

breesky33
09-30-2011, 05:12 AM
http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/ (http://http//www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/)

the link did not work?????

EsaVicious13
09-30-2011, 05:24 PM
They are addicted to the power of breaking the law. They need to hit rock bottom before they can change (rock bottom is not prison for habitual offenders). My homeboy got shot in the face, it just skinned him, and after that he became a buisness man. They need to be scared straight, but they might just end up with life before that happens, or worse... With habitual offenders there is a reason behind thier acts (ex: poverty, addiction, a tramatic experience, ect.). It is hard to estimate the percentage of people who will be able to overcome this underlying problem in order to rid themselves of a prison sentence. I guess it depends on the individual, and how much motivation they have. Sorry if i rambled. :)

nimuay
09-30-2011, 06:20 PM
It depends on the crime - sex offenders and murderers have very low recidivism rates, burglars and robbers are very high risk reoffenders. Domestic violence is also quite high.

Scott
10-01-2011, 12:31 AM
For many, this is not your man or womans first time being incarcerated. I been trying to research the percentage rate of men and woman changing their life around for the better but unfortunately have not had any luck. So i want to ask you here registered on Prisontalk about your own personal opinions on what percentage do you think that men can change their life around when they have been doing it (breaking the law) for the majority of their life? Or personal stories of seeing people change would be GREAT too. Thank You! -Breesky

100% of people can change - however the percentage of people who choose to change, and then follow-through is much smaller.

People do what works for them - and prison, as a culture, a micro-society and a way of life works for a lot of repeat offenders. I have been in prison four or five times (depending on how you count it) over the past 35 years. I am certainly, by the courts, considered a "career criminal" or "habitual offender" - always with the same kind of property crime (employee theft, embezzlement).

Outsiders really have no clue what "inside" is like for us "good old boys". Part of it is the being a "big fish in a small pond" syndrome, part of it is the freedom from responsibilities of being a husband, lover or parent - especially if you're in a relationship with someone who is needy and dependent, which a lot of guys run from (straight back to prison), or if you have minimal job and educational skills - the burden of having children you can't effectively provide for drives some guys back to the safety of prison - it's a way of protecting fragile egos and self-esteem that is really not well formed or grounded.

Abraham Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs" model plays a role. We all need "food, clothing, shelter, belonging, security, recognition and self-actualization" in more or less that order - and if we can't get past the basics (first three) on the streets, again because of lack of job skills and education, we can go back to prison where the first six needs are met (for us Good Old Boys), and then we can work on our self-actualization stuff - write poetry, draw, etc. :roll eyes:

There really is no global research on this, because it is so highly specialized, and so dependent on the individual skills, education and resources of each offender - not to mention how they frame their experience, both to themselves and to others.

In general, 25% of untreated sex-offenders re-offend, but that's not really a fair statistic because that figure just doesn't take into account a host of complex sociological factors.

If you can focus your question a bit, it might be possible to provide a more delineated response.

decoprincess
10-01-2011, 12:33 AM
http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/ (http://http//www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/)

just google
national reentry resource center org

the address is correct, sorry it won't recognize the link.

decoprincess
10-01-2011, 01:10 AM
http://sentencingproject.org/doc/publications/inc_federalsentencingreporter.pdf (http://http//sentencingproject.org/doc/publications/inc_federalsentencingreporter.pdf)
http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/

Here, let me try another two, hope they work.

My husband has been in and out since he was 13. Last time was 6 yrs, this time 8 yrs.
Now at 38, his experience in prison is very different and he is not, let’s say, playing the same games.
Changing your life is a matter of changing your habits.
What is the ingredient, catalyst, epiphany or inspiration that changes one's life? That would be answered by those who break their chains of personal bondage.

As Scott brought up "We all need "food, clothing, shelter, belonging, security, recognition and self-actualization." My husband never had the next 3-4-5-6. The first three he begged, borrowed or stole. He now has belonging, security, recognition and is achieving self-actualization.
If you ask him, he would tell you that he has 3-4-6 is because of me.

Scott
10-01-2011, 01:49 AM
work.

My husband has been in and out since he was 13. Last time was 6 yrs, this time 8 yrs. Now at 38, his experience in prison is very different and he is not, let’s say, playing the same games. Changing your life is a matter of changing your habits.

Actually, changing your life is a matter of changing your THINKING - but understanding your habitual thinking can certainly play a part in that. Especially if you have a little bit of an OCD personality. We're all afraid of change, but some people more so than others - and some REALLY rely on the comfort of the familiar, even it is's uncomfortable.

What is the ingredient, catalyst, epiphany or inspiration that changes one's life? That would be answered by those who break their chains of personal bondage.

The ingredient is that the pay-value of what they got before just isn't working for them anymore. The only cure for a criminal personality disorder is age. At some point you realize that you're not as young as you once were and something clicks... the pay-value of being outside becomes greater than the pay value of being inside.

As Scott brought up "We all need "food, clothing, shelter, belonging, security, recognition and self-actualization." My husband never had the next 3-4-5-6. The first three he begged, borrowed or stole. He now has belonging, security, recognition and is achieving self-actualization.

Do you mean he never had those on the streets? Because he certainly has had them inside prison. That's what makes prison so attractive and comfortable. Those secondary level needs are met.

If you ask him, he would tell you that he has 3-4-6 is because of me.

And that's lovely, but the reality has to be that we make the change for ourselves, not for anyone else. I'd love to lose some weight, but if I do it for my trainer, or partner, or friends - it isn't going to work. I have to have the self-esteem myself to know I'm worth it and make the changes because it's in my best interest to do it. That said, it's great to be a support to someone in this process. You may be a "trigger" in his reformation, but the cause has to come from inside himself.

Take a minute (20 actually) and watch this WONDERFUL, Amazing little movie.

The Butterfly Circus (http://thebutterflycircus.com/), wait until the page loads, a blue butterfly appears - and then you will see ""Watch the Short Film" in the center of the butterfly. Click there. It's life changing.

Firebrand
10-01-2011, 08:32 PM
Boy….that word “habitual” just kinda comes at me like……Hannibal Lector or Attila the Hun, ya know? It always makes me wonder, too, are we ever going to get to the point that we become habitual about some things that we uh…like….habitually need to?

How bout instead of waging war in places like Vietnam, Korea, Afghanistan, or Iraq, we habitually get in the habit of getting real ugly with those countries and places where we know that the poppy seed and cocoa plant grow for the sake of eliminating all the dope that comes across our borders. Maybe those of us who have personal demons where chemicals are concerned could possibly believe that some day the dope house will not be up the street and the liquor store just a little ways past it? How bout that kind of habitual?

Or how bout this kind of habitual; if I pay taxes in this country and can be called upon to serve in a time of war, you habitually stop telling me that I can’t rent an apartment somewhere because I’m a habitual criminal or if I pay taxes you stop telling me I can’t vote because I’m on parole in spite of the fact that I pay the salaries of the all those haters in office who depend upon like some one like me to habitually hold a job? How bout that kind of habitual?

As someone who’s taken 4 trips to prison here in Texas and spent 15 years in there, do I think I’m a part of the percentage of habitual offenders that is successfully finding a way to stay out? At the moment, yes, I am?

It’s the other habituals that I’m noticing more of though, ya know? People who habitually ignore solutions to problems because it’s easier to make money and look the other way than it is to help the very people you represent or say you represent, any way.