View Full Version : What degree can convicted felons actually use


Dreamwife
06-21-2011, 07:53 AM
I want to know is what degrees can imates actually use.

boopers01265
07-14-2011, 12:41 PM
In california you can become a drug ad alcohol couselor if u are a fellon, however you can not have any sexual related convictions, but oter than that most agencies wil hire you. I am curently working at a place that is for incustody inmates and a lot of our staff are fellons.

Tsanchez554
07-14-2011, 02:36 PM
anything not in criminal justice, convicted felon can study any program they wanted, just wouldnt get into criminal justice( u can study it but noone will hire you) keep thiose types of thigns in mind.

yourself
07-14-2011, 04:19 PM
if the institution will let you study it, you can get the degree. The value of the degree depends on the market, as per anything else. You can even get a law degree, and provided you can pass the bar, you can work as a lawyer.

I'd stay away from Chemistry, physics, architecture, structural engineering and the like. But, since it's always of interest to inmates, a degree in nutrition may be interesting, and you can get work in all sorts of facilities ranging from summer camps to mental institutions to retirement homes. At the same time, you can do your papers on the nutritional value and components of the meals you obtain from your facility, as well as the nutritional value of those things available through commissary.

Other degrees to avoid include education for anybody convicted of a sex offense, or a crime of violence. However, you can get your doctoral, and work in a plethora of non school environments, including writing tests for national testing, curriculum reviews, and teaching at the college level.

Pie421
07-24-2011, 02:22 AM
You cannot get any degree in the medical field either as a convicted felon you will not be able to get licensed in any state.

yourself
07-24-2011, 01:05 PM
You cannot get any degree in the medical field either as a convicted felon you will not be able to get licensed in any state.

ah, but licensing is different from getting the degree. If you really want a degree in a medical field, you need to talk with the medical field and then the licensing people in your state.

Here's what I know: it's harder, but not impossible to get a license. You need a lot of clean time, and a lot of people endorsing you, but generally, you can get a license. The big bug-a-boo concerns crimes of violence; but even then you may get around it and get licensed. If you can't in your state, you may want to check into working elsewhere - Doctors Without Borders, the UN, etc, etc, etc. You might have to spend a period of years licensed outside the US doing interviews of survivors of human rights abuses, but at least you'll be practicing in an area you've trained for.

But, if you want to stay in this country and do something in medicine, your best bet is to get a research degree, and not licensed to practice.

Real Checker
07-28-2011, 10:08 AM
With the vast array of degrees available that is really too general of a question to answer completely. Having a degree on one discipline does not exclude you from a career in another. It depends on the goals of an individual as well. For instance, if a person just wanted to be employable, then that person would want a degree in a field where their background will not be an too great an obstacle. Where I am employed there was a minimum degree requirement which I met thanks to my prison education. The requirement was for a degree in applied electronics, mine was a computer science degree in information technology. They accepted it. Lots of variables, but the bottom line for me is if you are wanting to become employable then the more education you have the better.

tippy2
08-04-2011, 06:22 AM
electronics, computer technology, it systems, study accounting--learn to process W7 forms and you can work as a tax preparer with steady income year round. you can do consultant work on your own or go vocational and study business management and go into business for yourself laying carpet, landscaping. and there are firms that will hire you as a paralegal...depends on the state you're in for licenses, second chance programs, etc. study a language and be a translator--huge demand for bilingual interpreters.

nireda
08-05-2011, 10:50 PM
ah, but licensing is different from getting the degree. If you really want a degree in a medical field, you need to talk with the medical field and then the licensing people in your state.

Here's what I know: it's harder, but not impossible to get a license. You need a lot of clean time, and a lot of people endorsing you, but generally, you can get a license. The big bug-a-boo concerns crimes of violence; but even then you may get around it and get licensed. If you can't in your state, you may want to check into working elsewhere - Doctors Without Borders, the UN, etc, etc, etc. You might have to spend a period of years licensed outside the US doing interviews of survivors of human rights abuses, but at least you'll be practicing in an area you've trained for.

But, if you want to stay in this country and do something in medicine, your best bet is to get a research degree, and not licensed to practice.



In the state of Michigan when you apply to law, nursing or medical school they do a background check on you. If you have even a misdemeanor you will not be accepted in the program, therefore you would not be able to obtain a degree.

Pie421
08-27-2011, 07:14 AM
In the state of Michigan when you apply to law, nursing or medical school they do a background check on you. If you have even a misdemeanor you will not be accepted in the program, therefore you would not be able to obtain a degree.

That is why I stated no medical field. I am a nurse and if you don't pass background check no getting into a program...and even without any offenses there are waiting lists from 1-5 years to get into nursing programs here!

yourself
08-28-2011, 05:41 PM
In the state of Michigan when you apply to law, nursing or medical school they do a background check on you. If you have even a misdemeanor you will not be accepted in the program, therefore you would not be able to obtain a degree.

Every state level law license I've ever applied for has required a background check. That background check includes filling out information on pages that stack to more than half an inch thick. So, I've had to cop to each and every crime I've ever committed to each and every bar. Granted, my crimes are at most simple misdemeanors - in Iowa speeding is punishable by 1-3 months in jail as a simple misdemeanor. I had a failure to stop at a stop sign on a bicycle in CA way back when, but I've had to cop to that, too.

Now, when I was in law school, a couple of students had problems. One got a DUI. Another got into a fight at a football game. Charges were pressed, and both plead out. They notified the bar when they were arrested. The bar worked with them, and both were eventually licensed after passing the regular, academic part of the bar, and getting their JD.

While I've never bothered with Michigan, I know felons in WI, IL, IA, MA, FL, CA, and CO who have law licenses. So, go figure. From the interior, you can become a lawyer with a felony in your background.

I've had clients who've had nursing licenses and other healthcare type licenses. You can have a license if you have a felony. You will have problems, and hoops to jump through, but you can get and keep a license with a felony. The exceptions are violent felonies, sexual felonies, and some drug cases. Each state and each licensing board is different, but there's no blanket exclusion from licensing if you have a criminal record.

So, if you want a particular career, and you know you have a red flag in your background, you need to talk to the people who do the licensing in your state. If you run into a roadblock there, try another state.

And, there are law schools that will accept you and teach you even if there's a good chance that you won't be able to get a license. So, again, you need to talk with the licensing board in your intended field in your intended state.

Further, if you have a degree, and lose your license, you can still work in other countries or organizations that deal with health and welfare concerns in other countries. Doctors Without Boarders, the UN, Human Rights Watch, and plenty of other organizations need people who know what they're doing to go and help people in other countries. Want to work in counseling? Go spend a couple of years taking witness statements from war crime survivors in refugee camps. Want to work in nursing? Go spend a few years doing basic health services to native populations along the Amazon river.

If you want to do something, you'll find a way, no matter what some idiot in an administrations office says somewhere.

Do believe Kaplan University is still offering online JD degrees. They're national. My law degree from a school in FL is more than enough to let me make an application to get a MI law license, should I ever want one. Further, I already have federal licenses, so I can always go to MI to work in the federal courts, whether MI likes it or not.

justinr11
10-02-2011, 08:40 PM
If I could do things over, I would go for electrical engineering. If I failed, the experience would tie in to a free apprenticeship at an electrical union. They can make $70,000 easy with experience. Some of these people become project managers or go higher. And at the union they train people in a way that they learn the trade without getting esoteric. I would still study language and business law at some point but even with demand, salaries vary by language for translators. The best way to choose might be to ask the guidance counselor for the salary stats for each major and type of engineering. I think they have it and you already know some majors that require a background check.

nireda
10-06-2011, 11:42 PM
Every state level law license I've ever applied for has required a background check. That background check includes filling out information on pages that stack to more than half an inch thick. So, I've had to cop to each and every crime I've ever committed to each and every bar. Granted, my crimes are at most simple misdemeanors - in Iowa speeding is punishable by 1-3 months in jail as a simple misdemeanor. I had a failure to stop at a stop sign on a bicycle in CA way back when, but I've had to cop to that, too.

Now, when I was in law school, a couple of students had problems. One got a DUI. Another got into a fight at a football game. Charges were pressed, and both plead out. They notified the bar when they were arrested. The bar worked with them, and both were eventually licensed after passing the regular, academic part of the bar, and getting their JD.

While I've never bothered with Michigan, I know felons in WI, IL, IA, MA, FL, CA, and CO who have law licenses. So, go figure. From the interior, you can become a lawyer with a felony in your background.

I've had clients who've had nursing licenses and other healthcare type licenses. You can have a license if you have a felony. You will have problems, and hoops to jump through, but you can get and keep a license with a felony. The exceptions are violent felonies, sexual felonies, and some drug cases. Each state and each licensing board is different, but there's no blanket exclusion from licensing if you have a criminal record.

So, if you want a particular career, and you know you have a red flag in your background, you need to talk to the people who do the licensing in your state. If you run into a roadblock there, try another state.

And, there are law schools that will accept you and teach you even if there's a good chance that you won't be able to get a license. So, again, you need to talk with the licensing board in your intended field in your intended state.

Further, if you have a degree, and lose your license, you can still work in other countries or organizations that deal with health and welfare concerns in other countries. Doctors Without Boarders, the UN, Human Rights Watch, and plenty of other organizations need people who know what they're doing to go and help people in other countries. Want to work in counseling? Go spend a couple of years taking witness statements from war crime survivors in refugee camps. Want to work in nursing? Go spend a few years doing basic health services to native populations along the Amazon river.

If you want to do something, you'll find a way, no matter what some idiot in an administrations office says somewhere.

Do believe Kaplan University is still offering online JD degrees. They're national. My law degree from a school in FL is more than enough to let me make an application to get a MI law license, should I ever want one. Further, I already have federal licenses, so I can always go to MI to work in the federal courts, whether MI likes it or not.


I was not speaking about getting licensed in a state, I was being particular about getting into a specific program. Clearly, if you have finished law school and passed the bar then MI would allow you to become licensed in this state. However, in MI, when you APPLY to law, nursing and medical schools, you are automatically denied admission into the program if you do not pass the background check.

justinr11
10-09-2011, 05:51 PM
Not wanting to be a fly in the ointment, but that guy Michael Savage on the radio has a PhD in Nutrition and no college would hire him because of affirmative action he says. But I guess there are other options. Engineering is an excellent choice if you study hard with the tutorial hour and even if the government officialy interferes with your employment, which happens, any factory would love to pay you great money and likely overlook a rap sheet. "Don't take Physics, chemistry, or structural engineering"? Physics was my favorite and most useful science class. I learned how air is pressurized in coils to heat it and then fans blowing the heat away create refrigeration, or how a large tank of fluid with great surface area is pressurized to force fluid in a very narrow pipe to lift a car, (hydraulic principles). Just because it might have a chapter on atomic priciples doesn't mean some ex-con is going to have 40 million Dollars, a team of Pakistani scientists, and some rocks from Africa to wreak havoc. Chemistry teaches information that can be used for good or evil, but if someone wanted to do evil they could go to the library tonight.

It is like when California wanted to outlaw SCUBA diving for ex-cons. Anyone in the water leaves giant tell-tale bubbles that can be seen unless they spend $10,000 on a closed-circuit system. It was a bill to try to vindictively attack an ex-con who was training as a diver. (That can be illegal by the way to pass a law with specific intent of retribution without cause. See Minneapolis Star Tribune vs. Commissioner 1983). It is still legal to educate yourself-make it count. If one takes any wage, I dont think a person will ever be without work in engineering.

A class in management itself could be helpful. Business Law should be a must for everyone. But I had near perfect grades and good accounting classes in California. People would tell me "You interview very well". I went to a great school. And I think while on parole I was prevented from working in that field. Later I kind of tricked my way into jobs through referrals where they hadn't looked deeply in the past. Honestly, a lot of business management jobs just have you keep journals which is fairly simple. (Running tallies of expenses and income) and the rest is sent quarterly to a tax preparer who organizes everything for you sometimes for over $100 a month ten years ago. If you have technical ability, a desk job and business accumen can come later.

justinr11
10-09-2011, 06:09 PM
If you study law, be sure you check your state's requirements before taking correspondence courses. I know California accepts Approved correspondence schools only, but most won't even do that. Forgive my typos, I am using a smartphone keyboard and I can't see pages well.

trustingGOD001
12-02-2011, 03:50 PM
You can't work in nursing homes or mental institutions with a criminal record.

Spyder516
12-13-2011, 07:27 PM
how do states expect people in jail to change if they take everything away from you

KookyMonsta
07-25-2012, 05:08 PM
You cannot get any degree in the medical field either as a convicted felon you will not be able to get licensed in any state.

You have no idea what you are talking about. The board of nursing takes every request for any medical license on a case by case basis. To tell someone that they cannot get in the medical field with a felony is wrong. I am in the process of obtaining my nursing license and I have a drug felony. I will get my license to practice nursing. Its no walk in the park to do it but it will happen. please research your answers before you tell people wrong information.

thegreatdoubter
07-27-2012, 04:13 AM
On a similar note, I have information from the United Kingdom re: degrees and people with criminal records (the UK does not have a misdemeanor/felony type system, unlike the USA).

Some professions requiring a degree are exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, which allows the various professional bodies in the United Kingdom to check for spent convictions as well as unspent convictions, or convictions that cannot be spent (i.e. those resulting in a prison sentence of more than 30 months).

The 16 exempted professions in the UK,according to this act, are:
Medical practitioners,solicitors,accountants,dentists,vete rinary surgeons,nursing professions (includes nurses and midwives),opticians,pharmaceutical chemists,teachers,osteopaths,chiropractors,psychol ogists,actuaries, barristers, social workers and social service workers.

With regards to specific offences, in the UK it is basically impossible to practice law or join the police force if you have a criminal record, and if you are working with children or vulnerable adults this will also not be possible if you have been convicted of a violent or sexual offence,particularly against a child or vulnerable adult. I am sure you also cannot work as an actuary if you have been convicted of fraud, serious theft,or related financial offences. As for the other exempted professions and occupations, it would be very difficult in practice to be accepted as a member of one of them if you have several recent convictions or one or two serious ones of a violent nature.

A lot of degrees can still be studied and completed usefully by prisoners and ex-prisoners (criminal records not leading ever to a custodial sentence are not significant in the UK for the most part when it comes to employment), so there is no need for them to despair!

Please look up the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act (United Kingdom) 1974 to understand what I am talking about.

yourself
08-04-2012, 07:50 PM
I was not speaking about getting licensed in a state, I was being particular about getting into a specific program. Clearly, if you have finished law school and passed the bar then MI would allow you to become licensed in this state. However, in MI, when you APPLY to law, nursing and medical schools, you are automatically denied admission into the program if you do not pass the background check.

MI law schools would be quite odd if they excluded people from applying. Further, due to reciprocity, graduation from ANY ABA approved law school forms the basis for sitting for the bar in any state. So, if the school you want to go to is that bigoted, and you're going to let that one school stop you from getting a JD, then clearly the law is not a career for you. I went to school in FL. I'm licensed in IL and IA. Granted, I do not have a criminal background (beyond a few speeding tickets - a simple misdemeanor in Iowa). I do know a few convicted felons who've taken JD degrees and gone on to get admitted in a variety of jurisdictions. But, then, most people don't have their heart set on going to Michigan State or whatever school you're claiming won't accept you into its law class.

yourself
08-04-2012, 07:59 PM
I was not speaking about getting licensed in a state, I was being particular about getting into a specific program. Clearly, if you have finished law school and passed the bar then MI would allow you to become licensed in this state. However, in MI, when you APPLY to law, nursing and medical schools, you are automatically denied admission into the program if you do not pass the background check.

Oh, and I took a brief look at the admissions ap for Michigan and Michigan State. they don't ask about felonies.

kyles momma
11-07-2012, 01:02 PM
My son wanted to be a rad tech. he was told he could do all the schooling he wanted to do but would not get certified just because of the charge and it was not even a drug related charge

yourself
11-08-2012, 04:24 PM
My son wanted to be a rad tech. he was told he could do all the schooling he wanted to do but would not get certified just because of the charge and it was not even a drug related charge

never rely on what one person tells you. If there's certification involved, look at what's written about certification. Realize those certification requirements change state to state. Go from there. Never be dissuaded by one bureaucrat with an agenda.

kyles momma
11-08-2012, 11:02 PM
never rely on what one person tells you. If there's certification involved, look at what's written about certification. Realize those certification requirements change state to state. Go from there. Never be dissuaded by one bureaucrat with an agenda.


I wish my son would really go to school and do what he wants.We went to the local college in the city we moved to and that is where he got his information.I dont want him to pay all that money for nothing.

melissajamroz
11-29-2012, 02:09 PM
You have no idea what you are talking about. The board of nursing takes every request for any medical license on a case by case basis. To tell someone that they cannot get in the medical field with a felony is wrong. I am in the process of obtaining my nursing license and I have a drug felony. I will get my license to practice nursing. Its no walk in the park to do it but it will happen. please research your answers before you tell people wrong information.


I agree with the above post. In Florida you can get a license as a nurse if you have had several years, 10 specifically, of time since your offense and you meet with the board. I have a friend who is a pharmacist and was convicted of a drug charge and was just informed he would be able to eventually get his license back. This comes straight from the nursing board here. I did plenty of research when I decided to enroll in school and choosing my major. I contacted schools, licensing boards, and HR reps. it is not impossible to get a job once you are a convicted felon, you just need to demonstrate that you have changed and that you are committed to succeeding by acquiring exceptional grades in school. For someone just to say NO you canít do that without knowing is wrong and discouraging to others. I eventually decided on Biology so that I can pursue graduate work in science. I will quote the Internship Coordinator from UF. It may be difficult for you Melissa but it will not be impossible....Another thing to consider...I just did a background check for my current job and I passed with flying colors and I have a grand theft charge from 2000. Most larger companies only go back 7 to 10 years...best way to find out if you will pass one, have a comprehensive background check done on yourself...

Have Hope
02-20-2013, 06:28 PM
Do you have any more information on this? I am conducting a research project to collect information that will help ex-felons know their options once they re-enter society and wish to get an education and job.

ebooksbc
03-04-2013, 02:36 AM
Employment barriers regarding previously incarcerated individuals exist nationwide, with or without a degree. Some fields are non-negotiable but I have seen individuals acquire very responsible positions traditionally considered off limits for felons.

I think, above all, one must have a healthy disregard for the impossible.

s&talways
03-04-2013, 03:51 AM
In the state of Michigan when you apply to law, nursing or medical school they do a background check on you. If you have even a misdemeanor you will not be accepted in the program, therefore you would not be able to obtain a degree.

In the state of Georgia as long as your felony conviction is not drug related, any type of abuse or violent, you can get a degree in the medical field as well as get licensed by the state. I have a Bachelors Degree and I am licensed in GA in the medical field and I have a felony on my record.

Mr.Evans
03-19-2013, 10:12 AM
good morning. I was convicted for an assult in 08. my passion has always been working with the youth.. i have done some mentoring with a non-profit org.. but i would really like to have a degree and work in that field.. was wondering is that possible, what you would you suggest that i do, to aquire and achieve this life goal? thank you..

prisonmomks
12-10-2013, 11:26 AM
I am researching to see what my son can study while in prison in Kansas. His felony is a violent offense, but he was a teen when it occurred and he will not get out until 2020. He is very interested in psychology and veterinary medicine and, as he has been working in hospice while inside, the medical field. He has been told it's impossible for nursing, etc. and psychology, but I have been researching psychology and have so far seen nothing to keep him from that field. I have a call in to the Kansas Behavioral Sciences Regulatory Board, and if that doesn't pan out, I'm going to try the Kansas Board of Veterinary Medicine to see about that. What I want to know is what sort of careers have felons in Kansas entered, what sort of degrees have they been able to study for while behind bars?

pvilla41
01-27-2014, 12:54 PM
if the institution will let you study it, you can get the degree. The value of the degree depends on the market, as per anything else. You can even get a law degree, and provided you can pass the bar, you can work as a lawyer.

I'd stay away from Chemistry, physics, architecture, structural engineering and the like. But, since it's always of interest to inmates, a degree in nutrition may be interesting, and you can get work in all sorts of facilities ranging from summer camps to mental institutions to retirement homes. At the same time, you can do your papers on the nutritional value and components of the meals you obtain from your facility, as well as the nutritional value of those things available through commissary.

Other degrees to avoid include education for anybody convicted of a sex offense, or a crime of violence. However, you can get your doctoral, and work in a plethora of non school environments, including writing tests for national testing, curriculum reviews, and teaching at the college level.

hi i was just recently released and am now in college im trying to get my life back together but dont know what major i can actually get and have a chance at getting the job also is there any grants for felons going to school

yourself
01-28-2014, 03:01 PM
hi i was just recently released and am now in college im trying to get my life back together but dont know what major i can actually get and have a chance at getting the job also is there any grants for felons going to school

your best bet is to go to career services on campus and look at what they have to say. If you have no idea what you're interested in, they can do some tests to help you figure out what your strengths and weaknesses are, what degrees and careers line up with your strengths, and give you an idea of the job market in your area.

InsomniaCT
02-01-2014, 09:02 PM
Almost every field will have some area of practice that will be more difficult and another less difficult to practice. Your first step, as Yourself indicated, is to determine your interests and then see how that relates to a degree and career.

In terms of career, many crimes start to look less ominous with the passage of time, no new charges, good references, and academic achievement. Meet with your campus counselors, as stated earlier, and start planning for what you are passionate about. Have the campus staff assist you, and start to make some solid relationships. By building a relationship with just one professor, you begin a network. Arrange to do an independent study--this is a good way of getting 1:1 time with a professor, which will help them to know who you are.

Best of luck.

mssirois2u
02-15-2014, 09:43 AM
I'm looking for bilingual interpreters and sign lang. course's for my son in Oklahoma, Any idea's?

SousVide
02-15-2014, 02:00 PM
There's an American Sign Language Dictionary in paperback with thousands of signs in it. It's a good start.

beachgirl3
02-23-2014, 06:06 PM
Every state level law license I've ever applied for has required a background check. That background check includes filling out information on pages that stack to more than half an inch thick. So, I've had to cop to each and every crime I've ever committed to each and every bar. Granted, my crimes are at most simple misdemeanors - in Iowa speeding is punishable by 1-3 months in jail as a simple misdemeanor. I had a failure to stop at a stop sign on a bicycle in CA way back when, but I've had to cop to that, too.

Now, when I was in law school, a couple of students had problems. One got a DUI. Another got into a fight at a football game. Charges were pressed, and both plead out. They notified the bar when they were arrested. The bar worked with them, and both were eventually licensed after passing the regular, academic part of the bar, and getting their JD.

While I've never bothered with Michigan, I know felons in WI, IL, IA, MA, FL, CA, and CO who have law licenses. So, go figure. From the interior, you can become a lawyer with a felony in your background.

I've had clients who've had nursing licenses and other healthcare type licenses. You can have a license if you have a felony. You will have problems, and hoops to jump through, but you can get and keep a license with a felony. The exceptions are violent felonies, sexual felonies, and some drug cases. Each state and each licensing board is different, but there's no blanket exclusion from licensing if you have a criminal record.

So, if you want a particular career, and you know you have a red flag in your background, you need to talk to the people who do the licensing in your state. If you run into a roadblock there, try another state.

And, there are law schools that will accept you and teach you even if there's a good chance that you won't be able to get a license. So, again, you need to talk with the licensing board in your intended field in your intended state.

Further, if you have a degree, and lose your license, you can still work in other countries or organizations that deal with health and welfare concerns in other countries. Doctors Without Boarders, the UN, Human Rights Watch, and plenty of other organizations need people who know what they're doing to go and help people in other countries. Want to work in counseling? Go spend a couple of years taking witness statements from war crime survivors in refugee camps. Want to work in nursing? Go spend a few years doing basic health services to native populations along the Amazon river.

If you want to do something, you'll find a way, no matter what some idiot in an administrations office says somewhere.

Do believe Kaplan University is still offering online JD degrees. They're national. My law degree from a school in FL is more than enough to let me make an application to get a MI law license, should I ever want one. Further, I already have federal licenses, so I can always go to MI to work in the federal courts, whether MI likes it or not.

I got arrested for attempted armed robbery in 2006 but got charged with attempted robbery sentenced to probation which would have given me a judication withheld but once my mom passed I violated a few times then went to rehab and now a convicted felon. I never got in trouble before that didn't know anything about the system at all. A friend owed me money and wasn't paying me back and I had just found out that my mom was going to die from her cancer, so when I went to her house I ended up beating the crap out of her. If I had known the outcome I would have never took the charge it should have only been battery. I looked into getting it sealed or exsponged to my horror I can't! I'm going to school now and I want to be a nurse or something in the medical field but I don't want to waste $60,000 that it's going to cost me. I live in Florida and not sure what to do or who to ask; the school says yes no problem but they just want their money.

beachgirl3
02-23-2014, 07:48 PM
I agree with the above post. In Florida you can get a license as a nurse if you have had several years, 10 specifically, of time since your offense and you meet with the board. I have a friend who is a pharmacist and was convicted of a drug charge and was just informed he would be able to eventually get his license back. This comes straight from the nursing board here. I did plenty of research when I decided to enroll in school and choosing my major. I contacted schools, licensing boards, and HR reps. it is not impossible to get a job once you are a convicted felon, you just need to demonstrate that you have changed and that you are committed to succeeding by acquiring exceptional grades in school. For someone just to say NO you canít do that without knowing is wrong and discouraging to others. I eventually decided on Biology so that I can pursue graduate work in science. I will quote the Internship Coordinator from UF. It may be difficult for you Melissa but it will not be impossible....Another thing to consider...I just did a background check for my current job and I passed with flying colors and I have a grand theft charge from 2000. Most larger companies only go back 7 to 10 years...best way to find out if you will pass one, have a comprehensive background check done on yourself...
Thank you for your post you are so correct in that it is very discouraging to hear NO and one might give up at that point when someone doesn't even know what they are talking about!!

beachgirl3
02-23-2014, 08:17 PM
good morning. I was convicted for an assult in 08. my passion has always been working with the youth.. i have done some mentoring with a non-profit org.. but i would really like to have a degree and work in that field.. was wondering is that possible, what you would you suggest that i do, to aquire and achieve this life goal? thank you..
Have you looked into getting it sealed or exsponged? I know with my charge I couldn't but hopefully you can. I live in Florida so laws might be different??

elco84
08-11-2014, 02:48 PM
Hello,
I decided to return to this site after having such a difficult time getting a good paying job. We have all been fed the line, "go to school and improve yourself for a better life," well, I was released in Aug 2009, that same week I returned to school to increase my chances of getting myself a better life as well as my family's. Well 5 years later I have completed an Associates Degree and a Bachelors Degree in Information Systems, and not one solid job offer from a decent employer. My felony is drug related, marijuana, and federal, and I just don't don't get many calls. At first I began lying and saying I had never been "Convicted of a Felony," but after I received my Bachelors degree I decided to admit and give all the details of my conviction. And now nobody contacts me.So I'm to the point where it is becoming more and more apparent that this society does not like to give second chances, as many do-gooders would like for us to believe.
I want to know is what degrees can imates actually use.

yourself
08-11-2014, 07:18 PM
I got arrested for attempted armed robbery in 2006 but got charged with attempted robbery sentenced to probation which would have given me a judication withheld but once my mom passed I violated a few times then went to rehab and now a convicted felon. I never got in trouble before that didn't know anything about the system at all. A friend owed me money and wasn't paying me back and I had just found out that my mom was going to die from her cancer, so when I went to her house I ended up beating the crap out of her. If I had known the outcome I would have never took the charge it should have only been battery. I looked into getting it sealed or exsponged to my horror I can't! I'm going to school now and I want to be a nurse or something in the medical field but I don't want to waste $60,000 that it's going to cost me. I live in Florida and not sure what to do or who to ask; the school says yes no problem but they just want their money.

Didn't see this. Here's what you should do: go to your state licensing website for the professions you're interested in. look at the requirements.

Once you're familiar with the requirements, go to your academic advisor at your school and your career counselor at your school (over at career services). Talk with them. Lay it out for them. They will tell you how concerned you need to be, and whether you'd be better off moving to a state with less stringent requirements (I do not know how stringent the reqs are in your state or any other when it comes to the medical field). You may need to get a licensing attorney involved, but your academic and career counselors will let you know if that's the case. They will also let you know how to go about dealing with licensure, whether or not a refusal is standard based on your record, and how to go about appealing a refusal and getting a hearing on the issue.

It may be that you can't do medicine in one state, but can in others, so you may have to work on that first - what states would allow you the best chance of getting licensed? and then go from there.

yourself
08-11-2014, 07:29 PM
Hello,
I decided to return to this site after having such a difficult time getting a good paying job. We have all been fed the line, "go to school and improve yourself for a better life," well, I was released in Aug 2009, that same week I returned to school to increase my chances of getting myself a better life as well as my family's. Well 5 years later I have completed an Associates Degree and a Bachelors Degree in Information Systems, and not one solid job offer from a decent employer. My felony is drug related, marijuana, and federal, and I just don't don't get many calls. At first I began lying and saying I had never been "Convicted of a Felony," but after I received my Bachelors degree I decided to admit and give all the details of my conviction. And now nobody contacts me.So I'm to the point where it is becoming more and more apparent that this society does not like to give second chances, as many do-gooders would like for us to believe.

and you think that you'd be getting more/better job offerings without a degree?

You picked IS. It's not like there's a dearth of IS people out there, especially at the AA and BS levels. You're competing with all of those people, and there's no shortage of those people WITHOUT felony records.

Want an easier time, go into something that doesn't have 20 to 50 people per position competing. But, hey, you could stick with your high school diploma and compete for manual labor jobs.

Listen; you've got a bachelors - it's up to you to determine what you want to do with it. You can remain one of the pack of bachelor IS people, or you can do something about it and specialize in something where there's not that level of competition.

I mean really - I got a bachelor's degree, I should have a high paying job. I got an MBA, I should be CEO of a fortune 500 company. Sorry it doesn't work that way: everybody and his mother have an MBA. Every other computer science major is an IS major. Doesn't mean you know how to do crap.

Want to improve your shot of actually getting a job? pick up certificates, as many as you can, and get to the level where you're not filling out applications for jobs but sending in resumes.

And above all, go to your college career services office and have them look at your resume and help you with your job search.

elco84
08-11-2014, 11:14 PM
Well I do understand the influx of IT graduates out there. But I have also applied for non-IT jobs as well. I also have previous managerial experience and I'm a Disabled Vet.
But I do agree with you one thing, and that is, I don't really know for certain why I haven't been contacted. Not sure if employers are required to notify you why you weren't selected because of a felony.
Also, next week I begin taking refresher courses to obtain a few certs.

and you think that you'd be getting more/better job offerings without a degree?

You picked IS. It's not like there's a dearth of IS people out there, especially at the AA and BS levels. You're competing with all of those people, and there's no shortage of those people WITHOUT felony records.

Want an easier time, go into something that doesn't have 20 to 50 people per position competing. But, hey, you could stick with your high school diploma and compete for manual labor jobs.

Listen; you've got a bachelors - it's up to you to determine what you want to do with it. You can remain one of the pack of bachelor IS people, or you can do something about it and specialize in something where there's not that level of competition.

I mean really - I got a bachelor's degree, I should have a high paying job. I got an MBA, I should be CEO of a fortune 500 company. Sorry it doesn't work that way: everybody and his mother have an MBA. Every other computer science major is an IS major. Doesn't mean you know how to do crap.

Want to improve your shot of actually getting a job? pick up certificates, as many as you can, and get to the level where you're not filling out applications for jobs but sending in resumes.

And above all, go to your college career services office and have them look at your resume and help you with your job search.

yourself
08-13-2014, 11:09 PM
Well I do understand the influx of IT graduates out there. But I have also applied for non-IT jobs as well. I also have previous managerial experience and I'm a Disabled Vet.
But I do agree with you one thing, and that is, I don't really know for certain why I haven't been contacted. Not sure if employers are required to notify you why you weren't selected because of a felony.
Also, next week I begin taking refresher courses to obtain a few certs.

Do yourself a favor and use career services at your college. They will help you with your cover letters, your resume, and anything else you can think of. They will help you tailor a resume to a particular job, and may be able to point you in the direction of places where your alumni status will HELP you get a job. They have resources. Use the help they have to offer. Polish up your resume. Develop more than one kind of resume, and polish it up. Have them help you with a nice, tight cover letter.

Seriously - that's what career services are for. They're also there to help because they like to be able to brag about the number/percentage of students who've been hired in their degree field within 6 months/12months/18 months and 24 months.

It's a frustrating job market out there for everybody. Use the tools you have, including career services from your university/college.

diggerff12
11-23-2014, 02:29 AM
You cannot get any degree in the medical field either as a convicted felon you will not be able to get licensed in any state.

That is not a true statement because after I was released in 2003 I became a firefighter/E.M.T and I was state and federally certified and licensed in the state of Wyoming and was so until 2010 when I let all of my certs lapse it all depends on the type and class of the felony

dagosta
11-29-2014, 03:45 PM
in all honesty I think the question is pertaining to employment not just education since what is the point of obtaining an education if one does not seek to utilize this education for some form of monetary gain unless they plan to obtain the degree while here in the states and relocate to another country which I understand if so doing they would need to find a country that would accept the felony charge as being a non felony in the country in which they seek entrance otherwise they will be ban from gaining entrance if it is considered a felony in that country as well. SO then when answering I would say the education serves no purpose if they can not secure a career in said field and if that be the case what should they do considering this factor.
just my two cents..

Christinasfree
12-11-2014, 02:58 AM
Hi all, Christina here, I just wanted to interject my thoughts on this subject!! PLEASE: do NOT allow anyone to dissuade you from bettering yourself through education, which naturally leads to gainful employment!! Some have stated "you can't work in this field or that field" or felons can't do ________(fill in the blank)..etc etc..Well, I disagree!! As I sit here finishing my THIRD final project of the semester and as I prepare for a huge final exam tomorrow in my "Intro to Legal Interpretation" course, and a final on Saturday in "Legal Terminology" I came upon this post...I don't even know how I stumbled back on this site after several years of absence! Anyway.... Personally, I had always dreamed of becoming a lawyer, but, 3 felony convictions later, I am abandoning that dream and "settling" for my paralegal degree and complementing that with a certificate in Legal interpreting to boot..Many legal interpreters focus on a position within the court system, I personally have not even explored that avenue as I do not want to work in the court system...Upon entrance into the certificate program for legal interpreting, I inquired as to any hindrances my felony status would impose and was met by surprising objectivity by the course instructor..Basically, I laid it all out for her and explained that due to poor choices and drug addiction, I compiled a sizeable criminal record.. I was assured that I could become certified through their college program and very well likely could become state certified. Although I do not plan on state certification, mostly due to the fact that state certification is a requirement to work in the Illinois court system and that is NOT my goal...Perhaps, I might consider it in the future, because to my understanding, the rate of pay increases considerably if you are state certified. There is a required background check involved, (there is even one involved in my externship at the college, including fingerprinting and a drug test to boot!), which initially worried me, but I was however, yet again assured I would be accepted despite my criminal history..She did however state that I would most likely have to take a meeting with the program director and basically present my own defense, as I would more than like have to do with the state licensing review board as well, if I decide upon state certification..I will have to plead my case, which I consider myself to be rather good at as I have represented myself in several pro se proceedings and quite successfully, I might add!!
So,my plan is to complete my paralegal degree (12 credits and an internship to go, YAY!!) and augment that with legal interpreter certification from my college..(2 separate programs, btw)....So to all those who say a felon can't..I'm here to say YES WE CAN!!!
My point in saying ALL this is to give you HOPE!! Do not allow the naysayers to dissuade you from pursuing your passion!! I believe with hard work, determination and becoming your own advocate, you can succeed at just about anything!! All my best and happy holidays!! Christina

yourself
12-11-2014, 05:52 PM
You can be a 3 time felon and still become a lawyer, even in IL. Yes, it makes passing the character and fitness portion of the bar exam a lot more difficult, and I'd recommend taking care of that portion in your first semester of law school, but it's not impossible. There are sure fire things that will keep you out of the legal profession, including imprisonment at the time you're making your effort to gain entrance, crimes that involve dishonesty or that otherwise impugn the vocation. I know that people who are affiliated with racial supremacy groups like the KKK have been barred, but felonies alone will not bar you from practicing law.

You need a JD of course (though this varies state to state), and to pass the bar (character, professionalism, and subject matter portions), and to swear in, but even with 3 felonies, it's do-able. With enough time, enough effort, and the ability to demonstrate a change.

dagosta
12-12-2014, 03:12 PM
CHristinasfree, thank you for that vote of encouragement so many need to hear this sort of statement as those who are charged with felonies are facing a stain on their reputation and if they care about who they are; it is one that will mar them deep inside. I know presently this is what I am dealing with; trying to be as upbeat and positive for the sake of my loved one who trusted the wrong people and it got him in deep trouble. he has learned now not to trust and to be on guard all the time. Hopefully this entire ordeal will not teach him not to trust the legal system in whole, but so far it is marring his view completely, I just hope he can rise above this and move past it his family is counting on him to do just that and he has their support. a very hard lessen to learn from, but it should be just that not a life long sentence or burden to carry the rest of their lives. they did the time and paid for it, people on the outside need to know when to let it go and give them chance to turn their poor decisions into better ones..