View Full Version : Projected Release Date? TDCJ


LaurieAnn
11-05-2010, 08:54 AM
Hi...

I am new here and hoping that I am doing this right.

My husband has an 8 year sentence. He is up again for his 3rd trip to parole in April 2011. He has been physically in since June 2008 but he also has 8 months credited to him....he will have about 3 1/2 years on paper before he goes up for parole. His projected release date is June 10, 2011. I have been searching all over for someone that knows ANYTHING about this whole projected release date thing. What does it mean?? My husband has not has one case since he went into TDCJ. Some family people have been telling me that he WILL get out by June 10th but I dont know if they really know what they are talking about. Can someone PLEASE help????

linksgirl
11-05-2010, 08:21 PM
Ok, I will try and help you as much as i can. Ok, he has 8 years, but has done 3 and half years. He is up for parole again on April 2011 and his projected release date is June 2011. First, he will come up for parole again in April as he did the last time he was denied. Then they can either approve him or deny him. If he is denied, it will probably be a serve-all they give him to his projected release date. That means that they will review him again in June 2011. Now PRDs are done differently than regular parole desicions. He will be voted on within 30days of his PRD, up to the 30th day. If he is approved, he will be release on that projected release date. If he is denied, he will get a set-off for 1 to 3 years depending on what he is in for. In the state of Texas, inmates use to automatically get out on there PRD. Any inmates that were incarcerated before Sept 1996 still do, if your man was incarcerated after Sept 1996, then the board now votes on everyones PRD, there are not automatic anymore. They usually do make their PRD, but I have seen a few that don't. I don't always know the circumstances, but there are people who don't make it.

My man was denied once after 7 months in, then he received a serve-all in July of this year. I got nervous and thought it meant he had to serve the rest of his sentence, but it actually meant he had to serve until his PRD which was Nov/2010. He was reveiwed again in Oct this year, we got a answer on Oct 27th and he will be home on his release date in Nov this year. Actually, I only have a week before i go to pick him up. I hope this helps a little and if you still have questions, you can message me.

LaurieAnn
11-07-2010, 11:47 AM
Thanks!! It makes me feel better that your husband is getting out on his PRD...mine hasnt had any problems inside at all so I think he has a good chance at getting his PRD!!

linksgirl
11-07-2010, 11:29 PM
Glad I could put your mind at ease a bit. I wish you the best and I will keep you in my prayers. Just stay positive and try to speak to the board on his behalf.

Lupe
11-09-2010, 01:16 AM
just an FYI...you arent given set-offs on PRD on on PED...otherwise everything is correct. setoffs are only on parole eligibility...not descretionary mandatory supervision aka PRD....

PrettyTxDarlin
03-24-2011, 12:44 PM
Ok, Lets see if I do this right. I have a question about a projected release date. It says his PRD is June 23 2011... He got to Holliday on March 23 2011...Does this mean if he's good and stays out of trouble he will get out on 6/23? or is that only if Parole OK's him??? I'm confused. He signed for a 4 yr sentence and sat 20 months in Hardin County Jail before getting sentences and moved. He took a plea, just to get the hell outta there.. Can anyone help me on when he's coming home????
Offense Date 8/17/09
Caught Chain to Holliday from County on 3/24/11
PRD 06/23/2011
Max sentence is 8/18/13
But says eligible for parole since 02/02/10.

At which point he wasn't even sentences yet.... Any help or answers????

Hallwaywalker
03-24-2011, 01:03 PM
Ok, Lets see if I do this right. I have a question about a projected release date. It says his PRD is June 23 2011... He got to Holliday on March 23 2011...Does this mean if he's good and stays out of trouble he will get out on 6/23? or is that only if Parole OK's him??? I'm confused. He signed for a 4 yr sentence and sat 20 months in Hardin County Jail before getting sentences and moved. He took a plea, just to get the hell outta there.. Can anyone help me on when he's coming home????
Offense Date 8/17/09
Caught Chain to Holliday from County on 3/24/11
PRD 06/23/2011
Max sentence is 8/18/13
But says eligible for parole since 02/02/10.

At which point he wasn't even sentences yet.... Any help or answers????

Hey there -

I had so much trouble understanding the differences in all the alphabet soup of terms around here. Parole eligibility has little to do with anything, really, and just b/c someone is eligible for parole on a date doesn't mean that they get reviewed on that date, nor does it mean that parole is going to happen. There is truly no way to know how the board is going to vote, and they vote on parole issues as well as mandatory release issues.

The way I understand PRD (Projected Release Date, which is the date when TDCJ has projected that Calendar Time + Good Time = Sentence. This arithmatic is figured on a magical abacus that is constructed out of unicorn horns :p) is that TDCJ sees the PRD as being as definite as is possible to be with TDCJ (which is to say, not very) but they act as if the prisoner is really going to be released on that date. That means that they do the things necessary to release him (transporting him, paperwork, etc.) while the Parole Board simultaneously is reviewing his file and voting on him. Because these things go on at the same time, it's possible that someone would be prepped for release on their PRD but then yanked back at the last minute, b/c the Parole Board has voted to block their PRD.

If I have this wrong, someone PLEASE let me know, okay?

I am figuring and planning that Hubs will be out on his PRD, simply b/c I can't function if I don't have some modicum of hope, and that's the only real hope that I have. I know in my heart, though, that it's possible that the board will block him, just like it's possible with everyone. It seems that it matters very little if they actually do what they are supposed to, and the only time that it matters is if they screw up. Doing well doesn't really work to their advantage, but doing badly and getting in trouble works very much to their disadvantage.

I apologize for sounding so cynical. Today is not a good day for me. :sad&blue:

I hope and pray that your guy is home in June, if not sooner.

RobinsMan
03-24-2011, 08:11 PM
...Does this mean if he's good and stays out of trouble he will get out on 6/23? or is that only if Parole OK's him??? ....

Yes, it is only if parole approves him. However, his odds of being approved for Release to Mandatory Supervision are better than parole, especially if this is his first time in prison.

Because his backtime counts towards his sentence the 20 months he spent in county also counted towards when he would be eligible for parole. Imagine if he sat for 25 months and then signed for two years. It isn't hard to expect him to go home right away. Same with parole eligiblity. He only needs to serve about six months and he had served that long before he actually signed for the time.


Lupe, they sort of are given set offs for PRD. I mean, if someone is eligible for release to mandatory supervision then they can only be "set off" for parole one year until their next parole review and the exact same thing happens when denied release to mandatory supervision ... they set another review date for RMS for one year after the denial. A lot of folks only think of true set offs to be for aggravated offenders where the set off can be anything up to five years.

Hallwaywalker
03-24-2011, 10:15 PM
if someone is eligible for release to mandatory supervision then they can only be "set off" for parole one year...

Okay, so if someone is eligible for mandatory supervision, then their set off won't be longer than a year? Or am I misunderstanding?

PrettyTxDarlin
03-25-2011, 10:37 AM
Yes, it is only if parole approves him. However, his odds of being approved for Release to Mandatory Supervision are better than parole, especially if this is his first time in prison.

Because his backtime counts towards his sentence the 20 months he spent in county also counted towards when he would be eligible for parole. Imagine if he sat for 25 months and then signed for two years. It isn't hard to expect him to go home right away. Same with parole eligiblity. He only needs to serve about six months and he had served that long before he actually signed for the time.


Lupe, they sort of are given set offs for PRD. I mean, if someone is eligible for release to mandatory supervision then they can only be "set off" for parole one year until their next parole review and the exact same thing happens when denied release to mandatory supervision ... they set another review date for RMS for one year after the denial. A lot of folks only think of true set offs to be for aggravated offenders where the set off can be anything up to five years.

OK so PRD is mandatory supervision? Not parole? But Parole votes on both? SO essentially parole and mandatory supervision are the same thing....?????

joe817
03-25-2011, 11:06 AM
OK so PRD is mandatory supervision? Not parole? But Parole votes on both? SO essentially parole and mandatory supervision are the same thing....?????

Hi P.T.D, welcome! And welcome to the often times confusing(if not contradictory) world of TDCJ "speak". I know there's some subtle difference but for the life of me, I have a mental block about comprehending what that difference is. If that makes sense.

So in order to keep my sanity, I take them to mean the same. At least in our situation with our daughter. I think the end result is about the same...but don't hold me to that.

And PRD means Projected Release Date. AFAIK, it doesn't differentiate between RMS(Release to Mandatory Supervision), and Parole. It's just a date....as I understand it.

RobinsMan
03-25-2011, 11:45 AM
If someone is eligible for Release to Mandatory Supervision it means that they are not 3g (aggravated) and THAT means they cannot be set off for more than one year. A denial of RMS (DMS - Deny MS) will result in another review for RMS one year after the date of the denial. Now, if they are DMS'd then what will happen on the inmate information page (locator page) is that their PRD will be set to match their Maximum Sentence Date, just as if they are 3g and not eligible for RMS, but that does not mean they do not have another review date for RMS.

If a person is eligible for RMS then the date that the parole division estimates that their flat plus good time will equal the length of their sentence, the date the law says they should be released to mandatory supervision if the parole board has not voted to block that release, is their Projected Release Date. So, yes, they are one in the same as far as what they pertain to. Once released there is no real difference between parole and RMS. They are on supervision one just the same as the other. There is a historical difference between how the two forms of release came into being but they are really just two different mechanisms for early release onto supervision. Hhow and when one becomes eligible for the two are different and some aren't eligible for RMS at all but, these days, the parole board has the final say in either type of release. One way to describe the difference between parole and RMS is that no one is getting out on parole unless the board reviews your case and votes for early release on parole. On the other hand, for those that are eligible, everyone is getting out on RMS on their PRD unless the parole board votes to block that release, which they do do about half the time. The board always reviews and votes on RMS cases unless they do not have enough advance warning (some transfer to TDC too close to their PRD for the parole board to have the chance to deny RMS) and the bar for denial that release is higher than that to deny parole. For the board to deny RMS they must find that 1) the persons accrued good time is not an accurate indication of their potential for rehabilitation and 2) their release would endanger the public. I think that if the parole board wants to deny someone RMS they can and will always find something or some way to make those findings but there is defintely a higher rate of approval for RMS than for parole.


For those that are interested. Ok, everyone knows what parole is and that is easy. It is just the notion that if someone behaves good and looks to have been "rehabilitated" by their stay in prison then they may be released early and the parole board was created to do that (it didn't always exist, before that you just did your time). Well, back in the day there was also a time when good time actually counted the same as days spent in prison. That meant that when your days in prison added with your good time equaled the length of your sentence then you were done. Finito. Paper free. Prison sentence over with no supervision or anything. Well, the legislature decided that there were too many people coming back to prison after being released so they decided to fix things by helping folks out when they were released. (Hello. I'm from the government and I am here to help. LOL) This they did by placing them under the supervision of parole officers whose job it was (bwahahahaha) to help them work their way back into society and keep them clean and from going back to prison. It was determined that the length of this supervision would be until the original length of their sentence was over. So, folks were released when their good and flat time added up to the length of their sentence but now it was Mandatory that they go under Supervision after release until the end of their sentence and thus Release to Mandatory Supervision was born. At that time the parole board had no say in whether a person was released to Mandatory Supervivion and it is the people that are serving a sentence for an offense during that time (prior to 9/1/1996) that are considered to be under the "old law" of RMS. They will be released on their PRD with no possiblity of being denied by the parole board. But, as we all know now, the legislature changed the law in 1996 such that the parole board has the opoprtunity to vote to block that release. This came after a series of RMS's of some truly bad actors that went right out and murdered again when anyone in their right mind would have known better than to let them out and so that is what the parole board is now supposed to do.

I could discuss further about how the parole board has taken that solemn duty to watch out for those that are truly dangerous and turned it into just another way to deny release, relegating it to no more an oversight than parole, which it was not suppsed to be. Also, all the aggravated offenders - those supposed to be the worst - are already ineligible for release to mandatory supervision so just how bad are those that they regularly deny RMS to? They are not even being compared to the worst, so to speak, when considered by the parole board but you know the parole board is giong to pick thei quota of those to RMS. Anyway, sorry about the long post.

PrettyTxDarlin
03-25-2011, 11:49 AM
How do i know about RMS... the page doesnt say anything... If i gave u his tdcj number could you tell me easier??? I'm so lost.. sorry for sounding like a dummy.. Just a confused girlfriend.

MamaB58
03-26-2011, 06:40 PM
PRD and parole are treated the same way once the inmate is released, so no difference there. However, his parole date and PRD date will be different. PRD is his projected release date that the parole board votes on up to 30 days prior to his release, if he isnt released to parole before that. RMS and DMS are the votes that the parole board gives when they vote for PRD. RMS is a favorable vote, release to mandatory supervision. DMS is a negative vote, deny release to mandatory supervision. If he is within 30 days of his PRD, then you can call the parole board that he is under and ask if a decision has been made. They will either tell you denied (DMS) or approved (RMS)

TonjaNation
11-18-2012, 03:09 AM
Fantastic information, thank-you! For some reason, I thought MS was being released on ankle monitor. Don't know where I got that from!! I appreciate you taking the time to explain that! :);):)
If someone is eligible for Release to Mandatory Supervision it means that they are not 3g (aggravated) and THAT means they cannot be set off for more than one year. A denial of RMS (DMS - Deny MS) will result in another review for RMS one year after the date of the denial. Now, if they are DMS'd then what will happen on the inmate information page (locator page) is that their PRD will be set to match their Maximum Sentence Date, just as if they are 3g and not eligible for RMS, but that does not mean they do not have another review date for RMS.

If a person is eligible for RMS then the date that the parole division estimates that their flat plus good time will equal the length of their sentence, the date the law says they should be released to mandatory supervision if the parole board has not voted to block that release, is their Projected Release Date. So, yes, they are one in the same as far as what they pertain to. Once released there is no real difference between parole and RMS. They are on supervision one just the same as the other. There is a historical difference between how the two forms of release came into being but they are really just two different mechanisms for early release onto supervision. Hhow and when one becomes eligible for the two are different and some aren't eligible for RMS at all but, these days, the parole board has the final say in either type of release. One way to describe the difference between parole and RMS is that no one is getting out on parole unless the board reviews your case and votes for early release on parole. On the other hand, for those that are eligible, everyone is getting out on RMS on their PRD unless the parole board votes to block that release, which they do do about half the time. The board always reviews and votes on RMS cases unless they do not have enough advance warning (some transfer to TDC too close to their PRD for the parole board to have the chance to deny RMS) and the bar for denial that release is higher than that to deny parole. For the board to deny RMS they must find that 1) the persons accrued good time is not an accurate indication of their potential for rehabilitation and 2) their release would endanger the public. I think that if the parole board wants to deny someone RMS they can and will always find something or some way to make those findings but there is defintely a higher rate of approval for RMS than for parole.


For those that are interested. Ok, everyone knows what parole is and that is easy. It is just the notion that if someone behaves good and looks to have been "rehabilitated" by their stay in prison then they may be released early and the parole board was created to do that (it didn't always exist, before that you just did your time). Well, back in the day there was also a time when good time actually counted the same as days spent in prison. That meant that when your days in prison added with your good time equaled the length of your sentence then you were done. Finito. Paper free. Prison sentence over with no supervision or anything. Well, the legislature decided that there were too many people coming back to prison after being released so they decided to fix things by helping folks out when they were released. (Hello. I'm from the government and I am here to help. LOL) This they did by placing them under the supervision of parole officers whose job it was (bwahahahaha) to help them work their way back into society and keep them clean and from going back to prison. It was determined that the length of this supervision would be until the original length of their sentence was over. So, folks were released when their good and flat time added up to the length of their sentence but now it was Mandatory that they go under Supervision after release until the end of their sentence and thus Release to Mandatory Supervision was born. At that time the parole board had no say in whether a person was released to Mandatory Supervivion and it is the people that are serving a sentence for an offense during that time (prior to 9/1/1996) that are considered to be under the "old law" of RMS. They will be released on their PRD with no possiblity of being denied by the parole board. But, as we all know now, the legislature changed the law in 1996 such that the parole board has the opoprtunity to vote to block that release. This came after a series of RMS's of some truly bad actors that went right out and murdered again when anyone in their right mind would have known better than to let them out and so that is what the parole board is now supposed to do.

I could discuss further about how the parole board has taken that solemn duty to watch out for those that are truly dangerous and turned it into just another way to deny release, relegating it to no more an oversight than parole, which it was not suppsed to be. Also, all the aggravated offenders - those supposed to be the worst - are already ineligible for release to mandatory supervision so just how bad are those that they regularly deny RMS to? They are not even being compared to the worst, so to speak, when considered by the parole board but you know the parole board is giong to pick thei quota of those to RMS. Anyway, sorry about the long post.

CenTexLyn
11-18-2012, 03:21 AM
Fantastic information, thank-you! For some reason, I thought MS was being released on ankle monitor. Don't know where I got that from!! I appreciate you taking the time to explain that! :);):)

FWIW, a number of releases on eligible pre-HB1433 cases, and especially pre-70th Legislature cases have been released on EM and/or SISP. That was precisely because THOSE cases are released to mandatory without the Board getting a say on the release. SISP caseloads were created effective September 01, 1998...specifically to address those cases from prior to September 1987 where ANY offense with a numeric sentence was eligible for mandatory supervision.

SISP cases are strapped up even before they walk out the front door...and it was not uncommon to see a lot of those with the old PMA credits as well who would refuse and just got into a constant shuttle between the Walls to Walker County Jail and back into TDCJ as soon as the White Warrant processed, only to repeat the process. The PMA credits were sufficient by themselves to add to the flat time and have someone with enough time for the release.