View Full Version : if someone went in for parole violation and was sent to pitchess is that a bad thing


hispooh-ka
02-07-2009, 11:15 PM
My fiance was recently arrested and sent to pitchess detention center is that a good well not good but ok thing that he's there for a parole violation..... and if posible does ne 1 know how long he could possibly serve

MitosWifee!
02-07-2009, 11:46 PM
If he is in for a parole violation more then likely he will go to state prison to serve his time.He will go to court and they will tell him how much time he has to serve. Pitchess is part of LA county jail.

patswife4-ever
02-07-2009, 11:47 PM
My fiance was recently arrested and sent to pitchess detention center is that a good well not good but ok thing that he's there for a parole violation..... and if posible does ne 1 know how long he could possibly serve


I am pretty sure parole violators get six months to one year, although I am not 100% sure on that.

hispooh-ka
02-08-2009, 12:12 AM
I have 2 kno :-)

MitosWifee!
02-08-2009, 08:16 AM
Yeah, its the same place.

crisco
02-08-2009, 09:42 AM
What is it for? Without defining the nature of the offense, it is hard for us to determine what the potential sentence will be.

hispooh-ka
02-08-2009, 11:13 AM
But was arrested for driving without owners consent

grayworldangel
02-10-2009, 11:11 AM
As I understand it, he will sit in jail until he is transferred to state prison, where he will wait for a "violation committee" to read the parole officer's report and then hear the inmate's response in person. California now has only 35 days from the time the parolee is re-arrested to hold this legally required hearing.

The committee then usually sides with the parole officer (something like 99.5% of the time) and assigns the inmate a violation prison term of between two weeks and one year. Sometimes it'll be "time served," but you never know.

By law, the parole term is a maximum of three years from the date of initial parole, but that clock stops running while you're in prison on a violation, but only for one year. If you spend no time in custody (as only 30% of parolees do), your term is a maximum of three years. If you spend a year or more in custody on violations, it's four years. California law provides for a "presumptive discharge" of parolees after one year. If you haven't caught a parole violation after 12 months, your parole officer has to fill out a form explaining why you shouldn't be discharged from parole.

Eastmax
02-13-2009, 11:39 PM
He will see a few representatives from the Parole Board to determine his fate while he is in the county jail, but they will likely put him on a bus and take him to Twin Towers to see the board, then they will bus him back to wayside when he's done, or just put him in MCJ until he catches the chain if they find him guilty of a violation. For something as petty as that, if no other harmful actions were involved, they may just kick him loose.