View Full Version : Prison slang/CDCR terms - What does that mean?


Brandy
08-18-2008, 04:35 PM
cccms? what is that?

MaraBlue
08-18-2008, 04:39 PM
C yard is slammed due to an assault - weapons were involved, so I'd expect the yard to stay down a minute over this.

A minute?

MaraBlue
08-18-2008, 04:43 PM
cccms? what is that?

Also known as "triple C", it's a term for inmates who need/take meds of any kind. It puts them in a special classification, that they need ongoing medical attention. I can be psych meds, it can be heart meds, it can be anti-depressants.

Sometimes guys get on anti-depressants just so they can be classified as triple C, so they don't get transferred.

MaraBlue
08-18-2008, 05:00 PM
I have no idea if anyone else feels this way, so I'm just posting this as a personal request. The majority of us come here for support and information about our loved ones. Not all of us are "up" on all the prison lingo, slang, terms and other jargon.

When at all possible, please use everyday, normal English. You may know all these terms like the back of your hand, but many of us don't. I'm not new at this: my son has been in for 7 years, and I'm still confused and confounded by some of the terms used. Imagine how someone new to all this must feel?

I can totally see if there's no "plain English equivalent" possible, but when there is, why not use it? An example: instead of "he did a dime", why not say "he did 10 years." 10 years is something everyone can understand.

I don't mean to come across as bitchy or ungrateful for the information that's posted here, I just want to fully *understand* what's being said. I don't think it's just me, since I see a lot of other people having to ask "what does this or that mean?"

So please, let's not play Buzzword Bingo. Thank you.

Brandy
08-18-2008, 05:07 PM
Also known as "triple C", it's a term for inmates who need/take meds of any kind. It puts them in a special classification, that they need ongoing medical attention. I can be psych meds, it can be heart meds, it can be anti-depressants.

Sometimes guys get on anti-depressants just so they can be classified as triple C, so they don't get transferred.

awww ok. thanks for explaining that to me.

PTO-110524
08-18-2008, 05:25 PM
I think it makes more sense to maybe post terms here that some don't understand. :thumbsup: Everyone should always feel free to ask what something means. I know I respond to questions about that all day long, so feel free to post here if there are words. terms, policies, etc that any of you don't understand - especially those new to the system.

PTO-110524
08-18-2008, 07:01 PM
A minute?

a minute = short period of time :D (this is not a prison term, btw)

PTO-110524
08-18-2008, 07:02 PM
cccms? what is that?


CCCMS is Correctional Clinical Case Management System. It is the court approved (Colemen Case) mental health delivery system used by CDCR. :thumbsup:

MaraBlue
08-18-2008, 09:16 PM
I think it makes more sense to maybe post terms here that some don't understand. :thumbsup: Everyone should always feel free to ask what something means. I know I respond to questions about that all day long, so feel free to post here if there are words. terms, policies, etc that any of you don't understand - especially those new to the system.

You missed the point of my post.

SaulNMe4ever
08-18-2008, 11:26 PM
I have no idea if anyone else feels this way, so I'm just posting this as a personal request. The majority of us come here for support and information about our loved ones. Not all of us are "up" on all the prison lingo, slang, terms and other jargon.

When at all possible, please use everyday, normal English. You may know all these terms like the back of your hand, but many of us don't. I'm not new at this: my son has been in for 7 years, and I'm still confused and confounded by some of the terms used. Imagine how someone new to all this must feel?

I can totally see if there's no "plain English equivalent" possible, but when there is, why not use it? An example: instead of "he did a dime", why not say "he did 10 years." 10 years is something everyone can understand.

I don't mean to come across as bitchy or ungrateful for the information that's posted here, I just want to fully *understand* what's being said. I don't think it's just me, since I see a lot of other people having to ask "what does this or that mean?"

So please, let's not play Buzzword Bingo. Thank you.


HEY GIRL I KNOW WHERE UR COMING FROM! I WATCH ALOT OF T.V. SHOWS LIKE LOCK UP ETC. SO I PRETTY MUCH AM UP TO PAR ON THE PRISON TERMS BUT I DO KNOW BEFORE, WHEN I WAS NEW TO ALL THIS IS, IT WAS SUPER CONFUSING!!! SO I DON'T BLAME YOU FOR THIS POST :) :)

PTO-110524
08-19-2008, 09:01 AM
Actually, I understood perfectly. ;) It was just my opinion that learning the prisoner slang terms and terms inherent to the prison system, will benefit more members (IMO) than avoiding them.

I will personally do my best not to post terms that may be confusing, but please feel free to ask me if I do post something that is. :thumbsup: I'll also try to remember that if I do use a term that may not be known, to also give it's definition. :)

PTO-110524
08-19-2008, 09:14 AM
I thought I'd start a thread and move all the recent posts in here. We can keep this thread going as long as it seems to be useful. :thumbsup:

So, feel free to post questions on CDCr terms or prison slang.

DontFakethefunk
08-19-2008, 07:52 PM
Actually, I understood perfectly. ;) It was just my opinion that learning the prisoner slang terms and terms inherent to the prison system, will benefit more members (IMO) than avoiding them.

I will personally do my best not to post terms that may be confusing, but please feel free to ask me if I do post something that is. :thumbsup: I'll also try to remember that if I do use a term that may not be known, to also give it's definition. :)

I think its beneficial to use the "prison slang" on here, It has helped me out alot figuring out what he is saying in his letters, i remember thinking whats a "melee:confused:" and because of PTO i didnt have to ask him and wait for an explanation. :thumbsup:

PTO-110524
08-19-2008, 09:17 PM
I think it is good to learn them, but we do have to remember here that there are many newbies who might not understand.

I think this thread is cool though. :D I bet we get some interesting words and terms posted here. :thumbsup:

2sleepy
08-19-2008, 09:31 PM
j-cat (i just learned that means crazy inmate) my son uses the term alot and I had no idea what it meant lol, I thought it meant something like "jail category" color me dumb

DontFakethefunk
08-19-2008, 10:06 PM
j-cat (i just learned that means crazy inmate) my son uses the term alot and I had no idea what it meant lol, I thought it meant something like "jail category" color me dumb

haha..yeah when i first heard j-cat i thought it was a nick name:D

mrscede
08-20-2008, 01:21 AM
Thanks everyone, im a newbie, also from Uk so having a double hard time on prison slang and also American slang, so expect loads of posts from me lol

Bobby&me
09-22-2008, 10:21 AM
Can anyone explain to me what "going to Doc" means. It is something to do with someone coming from Sacramento and telling the inmate what he need to get done, like classes rehabilitation. My guy is in under the 3 strike law and has done 12 Years so release date is not closed. :confused:

PTO-110524
09-22-2008, 11:16 AM
Can anyone explain to me what "going to Doc" means. It is something to do with someone coming from Sacramento and telling the inmate what he need to get done, like classes rehabilitation. My guy is in under the 3 strike law and has done 12 Years so release date is not closed. :confused:

Never heard that term, but DOC stands for Dept of Corrections.

My hubby is also a 3 striker and a member of the BPH (board of prison hearings) gives him hearings where they discuss what he needs to do to improve his chances of parole, like GED, anger management classes which ALL lifers have to complete even if they have no anger management issues, vocational training, etc. :rolleyes:

Bobby&me
09-23-2008, 06:18 PM
Thank Aliferzwife,
That sounds like what he is schedule for. How often do they have these hearings.

PTO-110524
09-24-2008, 11:07 AM
Thank Aliferzwife,
That sounds like what he is schedule for. How often do they have these hearings.

I don't think they are all that often. this was my hubby's first and he's been in over 3 years on this term. I think they just have them every few years to make sure the guys are doing all they can to stay on track for when the time comes they start going in front of the Board for parole. :)

Bobby&me
09-24-2008, 11:45 AM
Wow he has been in there going on 12 years and this is his first one. Do you know why now. He must have slipped throu the cracks and someone just notice he had not had one yet.

PTO-110524
09-24-2008, 12:18 PM
LOL - we were surprised my hubby had one at only 3 years into a 25 to life! Maybe it's something new. It was just one man, but he IS from the Board of Parole Hearings - even the forms are BPT forms, not CDCR forms. It could also be that my guy is a 3 strikes lifer. ??? IDK. :D

What the forms say at the top of my hubby's is:

Life Prisoner Post Conviction Progress Report. It states this was his Documentation Hearing #1. So...:confused:

It's 3 pages and each page is for one of his years inside and covers education, vocation, etc. Almost looks like it's supposed to be done annually but they are way backed up. Again, IDK!!

Maybe call your guy's counselor and see what you can find out.

Bautista Boy
09-24-2008, 12:28 PM
This refers to whether the inmate has any mental problems and either takes or needs medication. Sorry, but I don't remember precisely what CCCMS means, though it is referred to as triple CMS.

PTO-110524
09-24-2008, 01:41 PM
This refers to whether the inmate has any mental problems and either takes or needs medication. Sorry, but I don't remember precisely what CCCMS means, though it is referred to as triple CMS.


CCCMS is Correctional Clinical Case Management System. It is the court approved (Colemen Case) mental health delivery system used by CDCR. :thumbsup:

mrscede
09-25-2008, 07:42 AM
Hi everyone
this is a weird question i know lol, im trying to get used to both prison slang and US slang!
i noticed a lot of ladies on these sites call their partners "my boo" or "booboo" what does it mean exactly. it is not a term we use in the UK.

PTO-110524
09-25-2008, 09:07 AM
Hi everyone
this is a weird question i know lol, im trying to get used to both prison slang and US slang!
i noticed a lot of ladies on these sites call their partners "my boo" or "booboo" what does it mean exactly. it is not a term we use in the UK.

It's not prison slang. It's a cultural thing I believe. I don't use it and none of my friends do, but I see it alot. I believe it's an endearment. ;)

Let's be careful not to take this thread off topic. :) I don't want to have to move a bunch of posts to the chat on American slang terms. LOL

Bobby&me
09-25-2008, 10:36 AM
LOL - we were surprised my hubby had one at only 3 years into a 25 to life! Maybe it's something new. It was just one man, but he IS from the Board of Parole Hearings - even the forms are BPT forms, not CDCR forms. It could also be that my guy is a 3 strikes lifer. ??? IDK. :D

What the forms say at the top of my hubby's is:

Life Prisoner Post Conviction Progress Report. It states this was his Documentation Hearing #1. So...:confused:

It's 3 pages and each page is for one of his years inside and covers education, vocation, etc. Almost looks like it's supposed to be done annually but they are way backed up. Again, IDK!!

Maybe call your guy's counselor and see what you can find out.

Thanks for the Info. :thumbsup:

lisamarieo
06-03-2009, 12:42 PM
I think its beneficial to use the "prison slang" on here, It has helped me out alot figuring out what he is saying in his letters, i remember thinking whats a "melee:confused:" and because of PTO i didnt have to ask him and wait for an explanation. :thumbsup:

what is a melle ?

PTO-110524
06-03-2009, 02:10 PM
what is a melle ?

Melee is the term used by CDCr to indicate a fight between a small group of inmates. Usually 20 or less. Much more than 20 inmates involved and they'll call it a riot.

It's a french word and is pronounced "may lay."

lala_714
07-09-2009, 07:17 PM
what does it mean when an inmate is no good?

Mrs.760
07-09-2009, 07:23 PM
what does it mean when an inmate is no good?

Ohhh that's a touchy subject, I'm afraid if I answer I will come off as being unsupportive when I don't mean to come off that way I would rather another seasoned member or moderater answer:nospeak:

PTO-110524
07-09-2009, 07:34 PM
what does it mean when an inmate is no good?

LOL - nothing different that if you said it about someone as far as I know. There is no hidden meaning. It means the inmate is no good. A liar, a punk, a thief, a rat.

You should ask the person who said it to be sure of his exact meaning. ;)

lala_714
07-09-2009, 07:37 PM
LOL - nothing different that if you said it about someone as far as I know. There is no hidden meaning. It means the inmate is no good. A liar, a punk, a thief, a rat.

You should ask the person who said it to be sure of his exact meaning. ;)

lol. Thanks. I know that was probably a wierd question. But I am not familiar with there definitions. I tried asking my bf what it ment, he just said nothing. It's not being said about him, but someone else he asked me about. I just told him I dont even know what your talking about so I wanted to find out.

LovesickLocks
07-13-2009, 02:58 PM
j-cat is actually the prison slang for an inmate who pops pills all day.

LovesickLocks
07-13-2009, 03:05 PM
lala 714,
when an inmate is "no good" is usually means they're either a child molester,pedophile, a drop out, or a PC...now I'm not saying that all PC's or aka SNY inmates are bad people, some of them were just once gang members and simply wanted to go into protective custody, to leave the gang, and to save themselves from getting hurt even killed from their former gang.

lol. Thanks. I know that was probably a wierd question. But I am not familiar with there definitions. I tried asking my bf what it ment, he just said nothing. It's not being said about him, but someone else he asked me about. I just told him I dont even know what your talking about so I wanted to find out.

PTO-110524
07-13-2009, 04:12 PM
j-cat is actually the prison slang for an inmate who pops pills all day.

This is not how it's used in men's prisons.

Jcat (from 'Category J' - serious mental health issues) is a term used for an inmate who is or acts crazy. :thumbsup:

PTO-110524
07-13-2009, 04:14 PM
lala 714,
when an inmate is "no good" is usually means they're either a child molester,pedophile, a drop out, or a PC...now I'm not saying that all PC's or aka SNY inmates are bad people, some of them were just once gang members and simply wanted to go into protective custody, to leave the gang, and to save themselves from getting hurt even killed from their former gang.


Since he'd know if the prisoner was SNY, I'd say that's not what he was looking for.

And there are a lot of other inmates who are SNY who aren't SO's or gang dropouts. ;)

California_Mom
07-14-2009, 09:38 AM
This is a very helpful thread... it might even be a good idea to put it in the California "General Prison Talk" section because I'm sure there are a lot of us who don't understand the different phrases used.

Here's my question; what does the term "roll it up" mean? For example one person said "he might need to roll it up and go in the hole". I've heard it used a little bit differently but can't think of the way it was worded right now.

PTO-110524
07-14-2009, 11:46 AM
This is a very helpful thread... it might even be a good idea to put it in the California "General Prison Talk" section because I'm sure there are a lot of us who don't understand the different phrases used.

Here's my question; what does the term "roll it up" mean? For example one person said "he might need to roll it up and go in the hole". I've heard it used a little bit differently but can't think of the way it was worded right now.

In the context you used, "rolling it up and going to the hole" probably means he needs to go SNY. Old school would say, "He needs to PC up."

Guys who owe another inmate (usually for drugs) will have to roll up if they can't pay. Anyone in danger for whatever reason (won't join a prison gang, won't do what the shot caller says, etc).

"Rolling it up" comes from old school when you literally rolled up your mattress to move cells. It just stuck and is still used (by staff also) to mean you are leaving your current housing for any number of reasons:


must go SNY for own protection
being moved to another cell
being transferred to another prison
being released

Hope this helps.

California_Mom
07-15-2009, 11:12 AM
ALiferzWife, thanks for your explaination for 'roll it up', Now I have another question. What about the word 'Chrono'. My son said that he's in a lower bunk, but he would probably be moved because he doesn't have "a lower bunk chrono." I've heard the term used on this site before, but never thought much about it until he used the term 'chrono' in a letter!

PTO-110524
07-15-2009, 01:35 PM
ALiferzWife, thanks for your explaination for 'roll it up', Now I have another question. What about the word 'Chrono'. My son said that he's in a lower bunk, but he would probably be moved because he doesn't have "a lower bunk chrono." I've heard the term used on this site before, but never thought much about it until he used the term 'chrono' in a letter!

Chrono = informational notes by prison staff that document classification decisions, minor disciplinary offenses, medical orders, and just about everything else that might be recorded on a prisoner.

They hand these small forms (1/4 of an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper) out for an number of things - just about anything actually. My hubby has chrono's for:


lower bunk & lower level cell
cane
knee brace

:thumbsup:

mjnsamffire
08-26-2009, 12:24 AM
OK, does anyone out there know what being on CPQ or CDQ is. Is it some kind of quarantine or protective quarantine?? Just curious?

Uppity1
08-26-2009, 12:50 AM
OK, does anyone out there know what being on CPQ or CDQ is. Is it some kind of quarantine or protective quarantine?? Just curious?

Could it be CTQ? If so, that is "confined to quarters" and it could be for a number of reasons.

mjnsamffire
08-26-2009, 03:05 AM
Could it be CTQ? If so, that is "confined to quarters" and it could be for a number of reasons.

Thank you, I think that is what the guy said. Do you know if that would mean that he cannot have a visit?? I'm sorry, I'm going thru this for the first time and all these terms are not very familiar to me.

Uppity1
08-26-2009, 09:31 AM
Thank you, I think that is what the guy said. Do you know if that would mean that he cannot have a visit?? I'm sorry, I'm going thru this for the first time and all these terms are not very familiar to me.

I'm not positive but I don't THINK they can have visits. It could depend on why he is CTQ. I'm still trying to get the terms straight too! Every time I think I have them all figured out, they throw a new one at me. :)