View Full Version : NEW Legislation--Felony Drunk Drivings to Increase Prison Population by 5 to 10,000


deb
03-07-2007, 09:12 PM
Published March 5, 2007
[ From LSJ.com ]

Law could crack down on repeat drunken drivers
Midday update

By Lisa Roose-Church
Daily Press & Argus


A change in Michigan's drunken driving law could see more repeat offenders spending time in prison.

Gov. Jennifer Granholm signed legislation effective Jan. 3 that eliminates the current 10-year statute of limitations between first and third, or subsequent, felony drunken driving offenses.

Under the prior law, a third offense of drunken driving would be considered a felony only if it occurred within a prior 10-year time period. However, with the revision, a driver arrested for drunken driving with two prior offenses - regardless of how old the prior convictions are - will face felony charges.

http://www.lsj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070305/NEWS04/703050372/1005/news04.


Deb

ilovecharles
03-07-2007, 11:21 PM
I wonder if this law will be retroactive?

mrsdragoness
03-07-2007, 11:23 PM
I doubt if it will be retroactive.. but I knew this was coming.

mabear
03-07-2007, 11:25 PM
Got to fill up those recently empty beds some how. Good Grief :banghead:

mrtimmyslady
03-12-2007, 03:12 PM
Solve over-crowding by over-crowding? How can that work?

AmyLynn
03-12-2007, 04:20 PM
My ex is a repeat offender of this. It just seems like there should be some other way.

Chris' Gal
03-13-2007, 08:20 AM
While I can understand all of your opinions, this is one I wish would have been in place a year ago. My friend and her husband (who were newlyweds) wouldn't be 6 feet under if the the guy who was drunk and hit them could have been held longer. He is a repeat offender.

Penny61
03-25-2007, 03:58 AM
Drunk driving is against the law just as much as other offenses. To me it is a worse offense than say ..a B&E because you are risking the lives of other people. You may as well walk around with a loaded gun. I for one don't think it is right for convicted drunk drivers to be free to do it again and again , while some are put in prison for lesser crimes and kept there longer than is needed.

MomTo5
03-25-2007, 07:06 AM
I understand both sides of this. Drunk driving is very dangerous, most of us have been touched by someone being killed by a drunk driver. The problem is that prison will not fix it. I don't care how many years and how much money you spend on someone, prison won't make then not drink and drive. People don't drink and drive because they are hoping to kill someone. There is a reason they are drinking and a reason they are driving and we as a society need to find a way to help these people. There are a lot of things we as a society need to do but I'll stay off my soapbox for now. ;-)

Some people need prison, some don't. I think there should be a better way of determining because the current guidelines don't work. My man is in because he needs to be. He committed a crime, admits he committed a crime and prison probably saved his life. That is really the bottom line for us. It has given him time to thing about where his life was headed, what he wants in life and what he needs to do to get it. He has matured a lot and made some very real changes. Some of his family would say court ordered rehab would have done it and this is harsh. He admits that wouldn't have been enough. But there are certainly others don't need to be there because prison won't solve their issues. So lock people up, spend a bunch of money, prison doesn't help, they come out with the problems they had before plus several more that they gained in prison and we pay more for them on the outside and then pay to put them back in. Really good logic, huh? ggrrr

Penny61
03-25-2007, 10:38 AM
I didn't mean to throw them in prison the first time they are charged with drunk driving. You are very right in what you say,Mom To 5, prison does not solve the problem.the court system needs to look at the whole picture, not just the crime. My son had alot of personal issues to deal with, and was under alot of stress which lead to his violation, but did the court care? did ANYONE care ? no, not a soul cared. He needed a wake up call, yes, but he's been in 3 1/2 years already, where one year would have been enough, what he needed was counseling, someone to talk to. My son's case is a long story , which involves other people not just him.Prison is going to hurt him in the long run ,I think. If he had had someone to turn to when he needed it he wouldn't be where he is now. Then we have the people who commit crimes over and over again and are STILL free . It does not make sense to me.

Chris' Gal
03-27-2007, 01:42 PM
Mom to 5, I totally get what you mean that prison doesn't really "work" to deter a drunk driver. I also know Michigan is in a huge budget crisis. But; even if it does nothing for the drunk, them being behind bars can save a life. As someone who has lost a dear friend and her husband to a drunk driver, I can honestly say that the taxes I would have paid to keep that drunk in prison would have been money well spent.

MomTo5
03-27-2007, 02:29 PM
Yes, I hear you. That's why I said "I understand both sides of this. Drunk driving is very dangerous, most of us have been touched by someone being killed by a drunk driver." I agree with keeping people safe, I simply think there has to be a better way. My personal opinion is that a lot of the stuff that causes people to end up in prison starts when they are very young and what do we as a society do to help abused/neglected children? Not enough in my opinion.

dmpdbd
03-27-2007, 03:00 PM
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Momto5 - I say "Amen to That!"

Chris' Gal
03-27-2007, 03:31 PM
Yes, I hear you. That's why I said "I understand both sides of this. Drunk driving is very dangerous, most of us have been touched by someone being killed by a drunk driver." I agree with keeping people safe, I simply think there has to be a better way. My personal opinion is that a lot of the stuff that causes people to end up in prison starts when they are very young and what do we as a society do to help abused/neglected children? Not enough in my opinion.


I got your quote the first time, but "thanks" for the reiteration. I do wish there was a better, but nothing seems to be working. I am not sure how abused/neglected children fit into this, unless you are just saying as a separate entity. In that case, I agree with you 100%, and think that there is so much misappropriation of priorities in this state, that a lot needs to change. But again, I do AGREE 100% with you on the abuse issue...

dmpdbd
03-27-2007, 04:24 PM
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Basically, I think what MomTo5 is saying is that most people who wind up in prison, for whatever reason, have emotional issues, a lot of them stemming from childhood and being abused. I know my guy does and his answer was turning to drugs and stealing to stay alive on the streets and feeding his habit. If he had been treated for the scars of the emotional and physical abuse he suffered as a child when they became apparent in his teens, he would not have spent a lifetime in and out of prison. I only met him a few years ago, but we have now recognized the real cause of his problems and are working on them, albeit alone. As you know, there is no real counseling help in prison. However, he knows that is where his rehabilitation continues when he gets out.
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MomTo5
03-27-2007, 04:45 PM
Yes, yes, yes, exactly what dmpdbd said! Actually, I think the problems are often seen far before the teenage years. I used to teach and sadly we could often times tell as early as kindergarten what kids would probably end up in prison. It was usually due to abuse/neglect and behaviors they were learning at home. There was really nothing we could do but teach them as much as possible, love them, try to show them a different way in the hours in which we had them. Often times CPS is helpless because the abuse isn't "bad enough". Constantly being degraded can be bad enough to cause a person a lifetime of problems.

Also, please don't take it that we were like "oh that kid is headed to prison someday, why bother to try" so it became a self fulfilling prophecy of sorts. I know that I always hoped I was wrong and gave my all. I even tried to work with some of the parents.

Chris' gal, I am very sorry for your loss. I'm not trying to minimize that at all. I'm not even saying someone shouldn't have received punishment because they took lives, they should. I guess where my train of thought was going was prevention before innocent lives are lost and wishing there was something more we could do. I wish no one ever lost a loved one. I wish no one ever had a loved one go to prison. Lots of wishes, not lots of answers.