View Full Version : Fuchu Prison Japan - Conditions


Rachel
11-07-2005, 10:32 PM
US Citizen, Terrance David Sheard, was recently released from a Japanese prison. This is his account of his ordeal in the hope that he may highlight the suffering of those he left behind.
"I want to tell my story because I promised my mates back in the Fuchu hellhole [Japan Prison] that I would try to expose the abuses and cruel treatment experienced daily by all Fuchu inmates. Can you [FPSS] please help me? I owe it to all those who are suffering under the draconian prison system in Japan to tell my story!" Terrance wrote.
My name is Terrance. I've just been released from prison in Japan. I was arrested in June 2002 in the Narita International Airport by Japanese customs officials as I tried to enter Japan. I had 1 kilo of hashish in my possession and I was convicted for violating the cannabis control laws of Japan. For my crime I was sentenced to 5 years forced labor and sent to Fuchu prison in Tokyo. I had no idea how hard and lonely the next few years of my life were going to be.
Life in Japanese prison is very hard. Like the Nazi prison camps of WWII. Work is the main focus. The prison population is used as slave labor. The food you receive is barely enough to keep you alive. It consists of rice and soup. There is very little exercise except in the summer only twice a week for 30 minutes. During the winter they allow exercise for 3 times a week but they cut one of the 3 x 15 minute bathing periods. So during the winter there are only 2 x 15 minute baths. There is no heating or air conditioning in the prison. There are many cases of frostbite in the winter, heatstroke, and heat exhaustion in the summer. God forbid if you get sick and need medical attention. In order to see a doctor, or receive medicine a prisoner must fill out a form and wait for days. Generally, you will not be allowed to see the doctor unless you have a dire emergency. Tuberculosis is prevalent and there are many skin diseases due to the poor sanitation in the shower facilities. These are everyday realities in a Japanese prison.
Day One
On the first day of my arrival I was thrown into a filthy solitary cell and given a rulebook to read. The rulebook consisted of hundreds of rules for living in the prison. I was kept in this cell for three weeks and forced to perform menial labour, consisting of smoothing out the wrinkles in hundreds of aluminium cupcake doilies. Once I had finished smoothing out the entire carton the guard came to inspect my work. He reached into the box containing all the smoothed out doilies and crushed them all up again. I was told that I would have to do them over. After 3 weeks of solitary I was told that I would be starting to work in a training factory. During this training period you are shown how you will do everything in the correct manner. It was like a boot camp for Nazis. They have rules for how to walk, how to use the toilet, how to sit, how to place things in your cell, etc. etc. We were being systematically turned into automatons. Everything was drilled repeatedly into our heads. If we made mistakes during the training we were pushed around and screamed at. On two occasions I witnessed prisoners who were beaten for their failure to cooperate. I personally experienced a physical beating and strangulation to the point of unconsciousness at the hands of no less than eight guards after only being in the prison for three months.
The reason for this beating was because I was not marching properly. I was singled out by the Factory boss for my offence and told to stand in the corner with my nose to the wall. After I refused this order the boss pushed his secret panic button, and the goon squad rushed into the factory and smashed me to the ground, beating and kicking me for extra measure. One of the goons grabbed my collar from behind and twisted it until my air supply was effectively cut off. Upon regaining consciousness, I found myself in the presence of the foreign prisoner's chief. He informed me that I would be placed in solitary confinement for a while until the prison authorities could decide what to do with me.
Back to solitary Japanese style.
The cell I was placed in this time had the window blocked and wreaked of piss. The walls were mouldy and the floor surrounding the toilet was too. There were lots of bugs to keep me company. Everything was taken out of the cell except for a filthy mattress. It was explained to me that I would have to sit in the middle of my cell and face my door all day long [from 7:30am-5:00pm]. I was told to keep my hands on my lap and not to move. That was my existence for an entire month! The little bit of rice and soup I had previously received, my daily allotment, was cut in half. If I wanted to use the toilet, I had to wait until the guard gave the signal twice daily. No exercise and 1 x 15minute shower every ten days! I was caught on several occasions exercising in my cell and time was added to my solitary confinement. After about 40 days, I was taken out of solitary and placed back in a factory to work.
After my stint in solitary I figured that I wouldnít have anymore trouble. Boy, was I WRONG! You see, I had been labelled a troublemaker by the guards, and I was continually being singled out for crazy infractions in the factory and in my cell. Not marching properly, improper sitting position while working, looking out the window, not bowing properly, washing my face in my cell...the list goes on and on. The rules are so numerous that you cannot possibly remember them all. But when you are labelled a "troublemaker", like I was, the rules don't matter anymore. The guards and factory bosses can use their discretion to bend and break the rules as they see fit. Well, it wasnít long before I'd had enough of the harassment. One guard in particular, named Chiba, was trying to make my life a living hell. Everyday he would come into the factory and do his best to break me down. It wasnít long before I was back in solitary for another month. At least I didnít have to take any more crap from Chiba for awhile.
During my second stay in solitary, someone down the hall from my cell tried to commit suicide by punching the glass in his window and using a piece to slash his throat. The guards tried to prevent everyone from looking out the cell door window, but I managed to see them carrying the poor fellow bleeding profusely from his neck before one of the guards began shouting at me to get back into my position on the floor. I still donít know if that guy died.
So many thoughts ran through my head while sitting motionless for hours on end. Never before in my life had I been caged and cut off from the world. I wondered what my wife and son were doing. My boy was only 6 months old when I was arrested and he was growing up without his father. While in solitary your monthly 15-minute visit behind a glass partition is not allowed, so I was not able to see my wife and son during the months that I was punished. I was not allowed to write my one monthly 7-page letter either. No communication with anyone whatsoever!
As I gazed at the stains on the wall, I thought about my travels in the past and surfing adventures, the feeling of the ocean. I always wondered what all of my family and friends were doing. So many times I would think of real food; a bar of chocolate, a cup of coffee. It is so strange all of the fleeting thoughts and visions that popped into my head. Many times, I wondered if I was strong enough to make it through the shit I was now facing. I made a vow to myself that I would get through this, and that suicide would never be an option for me. Prior to being in prison, I had lived in a Buddhist Monastery in Thailand for a few weeks. I learned many things from the monks during my stay. The knowledge I gained there was instrumental in my being able to deal with the suffering I experienced in prison. I practiced meditation daily. In this prison, I learned much about survival in the face of adversity. I was determined not to give up hope.
I ended up being thrown into solitary confinement five times during my stay in Fuchu. On March 25th 2005, I was lucky enough to be transferred to an American Federal Prison to finish serving my sentence.
I am only the 2nd American to be transferred out of Japan. Apparently, the Japanese prison authorities know that we will receive better treatment in American prisons, so they are making foreigners serve at least 50% of our sentences in Japan before they will agree to let us transfer.
When I arrived at the federal detention center in Los Angeles, I felt like I had died and gone to Disneyland. The difference in the two prison systems is incredible! The treatment I received in the American prison was humane and tolerable. The Japanese system lacks any trace of humanity. I believe that Japan needs to change many things about their prison system. Japan is one of the leading high-tech societies in the world, yet the prison system is a reflection of a draconian medieval society. The prisons operate under a veil of secrecy and silence that needs to be lifted. The truth needs to be known. That is why I am writing this article. Even though I am free today there are many people who are suffering daily in Japanese prisons. Yes, I was guilty of my crime, but I feel that nobody deserves to be tortured, abused, thrown away, and isolated from everything in a living hell.
Terrance David Sheard
Los Angeles [USA]



Foreign Prisoner Support Service (http://www.phaseloop.com/foreignprisoners/prisoners.html)

gigi v
11-22-2005, 06:14 PM
Thanks For Sharing. That Is Terrible! He Should Send His Letter To Amnisty International .

Nicoletta
11-29-2005, 09:31 AM
Unfortunately Amnesty cannot do much for one individual. See the Nick Baker story...
Allthough their last report about Japanese prisons are from a while ago. Life overthere must me Hell on earth.

Rachel
11-30-2005, 08:18 PM
Nicoletta,
Have you visited a Japanese prison?
I think I read it in one of your posts elsewhere.
Could you share the experience with us in this forum.
Start a new thread if you would and we would love to read a first hand account of a visit.
I visited Fuchu in April/May and wrote quite a lot about how it felt and my treatment there.

Thanks,
Rachel x

Nicoletta
12-03-2005, 11:30 AM
Yes I have been to Japan but not to Fuchu. I went to Tokyo Detention Centre. I have made already my story in Dutch:rolleyes: and put it on my own website for writing inmates. I still have to translate it to English. But if you are interested I will translate the story to help others.

Rachel
12-06-2005, 03:58 AM
Nicoletta we would love to hear of your experiences in Japan.
Can't wait to read it once it is posted!

Rach xx

Nicoletta
12-07-2005, 12:43 PM
You don't need to wait any longer:rolleyes:
I started a new thread for this.

David
12-08-2005, 02:55 PM
Great job, Nicoletta! Thanks!

Nicoletta
01-30-2006, 12:35 PM
Nick is now also moved to Fuchu and got Frostbite again:argh: !!!! First he got frostbite twice in Chiba on his hand and foot and now again on his hand but in Fuchu prison.
The conditions in Fuchu are terrible. There is no heater or an airconditioning. Just for the guards...... Maybe only them can feel the cold and the heat?????????????????????????????:hmm:

What he needs is to be moved to a heated cell, or at the very least, allowed to wear whatever clothing is necessary to protect him from the cold. Would this be special treatment? Absolutely. But special treatment for one person is the starting point for decent treatment for everyone.

The Japanese Government should be ashamed of treating his prisoners this way. :angry: :angry:

Therefore his mum wrote a letter to the Minister to urge them for action. But untill now, nothing has happened. This must be so frustrating for her and off course for Nick too.

This is her letter;
Open Letter to Minister of Trade and Foreign Affairs


Mr I Pearson
Minister of Trade and Foreign Affairs
The Foreign & Commonwealth Office
London
SW1A 2AH


26th January 2006
Dear Mr Pearson,
I have on several occasions requested a meeting with you , you have made it very clear that you feel that nothing will be gained from such a meeting. Surely for you to understand exactly what is going on in the prisons in Japan you need to hear from the victims and their families as well as your own representatives and Japanese officials!
In your recent letter to Mr H Bellingham MP and Mr Norman Lamb MP you informed them that "no one has suffered frost bite this year or in 2004/2005" I have enclosed the report I received today from the British Embassy in Tokyo which clearly states that Nick once again is suffering frost bite as he did in 2004 and 2003. I do not accept your claim that no one suffered frost bite in the Prisons in Japan this happens every year and as done for many many years and will continue to do so unless some positive and humanitarian action is taken.
I find it totally unacceptable that Nick was never allowed a fair trial but I will not keep quiet while his basic human rights continue to be abused daily. Nick has now had frost bite of the hands and feet 3 times,. Nick as been an asthma suffer from the age of four and he is still being forced to wait for his treatment each day. Are you aware of how dangerous Asthma is when the temperature is really low?
I know that there are many injustices in the world today, but I am willing to fight for justice and human rights and I fail to understand why I do not receive any help from the British Government. My understanding is that Britain have good relations with Japan but to me it appears fragile because the issues of human rights and unfair trials have never been dealt with seriously even though there have been many complaints against this Country.
Nick as already lost his freedom in an unfair trial I hope Sir he does not lose a limb because no one cared enough to protect his human rights.
Iris Baker

see for more information Thread with link to Nick's petition (http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=117015)

tomblucas79
12-02-2006, 04:25 PM
I was in Chiba prison for 1 year, and Nairita Police Station for 3 months. Aug of 2002 for me when my fun started.

Well as some things Terrance has said are correct he is making it worse than it seems. First off you do a crime in a foriegn country be ready to do time there. When I started doing criminal activities I prepared myself for Prison. It is a fact of life for anyone in the drug game. Don't be such a pussy about it. I got treated how I treated them. If you could not play by the rules you got told the rules. ALL PRISONS ARE LIKE THAT!!! I am sure you were in segragation in the LA Detention Center. Bescuase I also did time in Twin Towers, Glass House, South Bay, George Bailey and SD all were just much more viloent. One thing about Japan Prison system is it WORKS. I was a career criminal before that and it woke me up. I thank God for it. We should have the same system in america. Maybe then we would not have 10 million people in US Prisons.

BY the way I was locked up with Nick Backe and Chris Snell. Now Chris I do not know but for 1 time seeing in transport, he looked fine when I seen him, but Nick and I were at the doctors in Chiba for awhile and had conversation and let me tell you I could see it in his eyes and in his face he did it screwed up becuase he was not ready for Japan Prison.

You get what you desereve.

Rachel
12-07-2006, 08:45 PM
Hi Tom,
Welcome to PTO and the Asia Pac Forums.
I am glad to hear that you are now out of the Japanese prison system.
Perhaps you would take the time to start a thread and tell us some of your experiences. It would help those who have loved ones inside these institutions to gain a deeper understanding.

Glad you found PTO and look forward to hearing some more from you.

Rachel x

stella4898
03-22-2008, 01:34 PM
Canada . My son is in fuchu.and what I read in his letter it is all true , my son has written me about those conditions , My God help us
chiara

stella4898
03-22-2008, 01:51 PM
I was in Chiba prison for 1 year, and Nairita Police Station for 3 months. Aug of 2002 for me when my fun started.

Well as some things Terrance has said are correct he is making it worse than it seems. First off you do a crime in a foriegn country be ready to do time there. When I started doing criminal activities I prepared myself for Prison. It is a fact of life for anyone in the drug game. Don't be such a pussy about it. I got treated how I treated them. If you could not play by the rules you got told the rules. ALL PRISONS ARE LIKE THAT!!! I am sure you were in segragation in the LA Detention Center. Bescuase I also did time in Twin Towers, Glass House, South Bay, George Bailey and SD all were just much more viloent. One thing about Japan Prison system is it WORKS. I was a career criminal before that and it woke me up. I thank God for it. We should have the same system in america. Maybe then we would not have 10 million people in US Prisons.

BY the way I was locked up with Nick Backe and Chris Snell. Now Chris I do not know but for 1 time seeing in transport, he looked fine when I seen him, but Nick and I were at the doctors in Chiba for awhile and had conversation and let me tell you I could see it in his eyes and in his face he did it screwed up becuase he was not ready for Japan Prison.

You get what you desereve.
My Heart go out to you as a mother , for you it was a career , for some sons of good mothers they make a mistake not like (you that know the system well )others fall in or get cought up in bad company that is the only mistake in their lives May God have mecey on you ,,,,,,,,like you have on others

Harry4160
07-10-2008, 11:19 PM
I read all your comments regarding Fuchu Prison. I spend from May 1994 to December 1997, 3.5 years in Fuchu and I want to tell my story. As prisons goes, yes Fuchu is a tough place. I worked in factory 22 and made parts for the automotive industry. To say Fuchu prison is a bad place is wrong. Why? After I left Fuchu prison I have never broke any laws again. I guess that is positive. Yes it is true that Fuchu prison is like all Japanese prisons run like a military style prison. No talking, no looking around, close eyes when you wait at the hospital for treatment, not sitting against the wall in your cell, and many other silly little regulations. No real heating systems in winter and you are looked up alone in solitary confinement from 6pm until 7:30am in the morning. Prisons in Japan are there for punishment not to cuddle prisoners and are waste your time. Japanese prisons are well managed and well organized to guarantee the safety of prisoners. Once I understood the rules, I felt safe. No other prisoner has ever touched me or even tried to harass me. Yes, the guards yell at you if you break the rules and in serious cases give you SHOBASH. But guards to not carry guns nor anyone has to fear being killed in prison. To survive in Fuchu, just follow the rules. Every prisoner gets a handbook in English when the get into the prison system. I would say Fuchu prison is just a few grades higher in toughness then the Marine Corps boot camp. I agree spending 3.5 years in Marine Corp boot camp would be hard. My point is, the Japanese prison system is not cruel, it is Japanese style of punishing offenders. The system is to punish and reform the prisoner to become a better person. Besides the Fuchu Prison system has also very funny moments and a good reward system. All prisoners will start with a white badge and depending on the length on your sentence a prisoner gets promoted to a green badge and after good behavior to a red badge. If a prisoner behaves well he will be released after 55%-60% of time served. Prisoners have access to piped radio either in English or Japanese and have little TV’s in there cells with are switched on at certain intervals. What have I learned spending in Fuchu? DO NOT BREAK THE LAWS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY. I am 100% cured of being a deviant lawbreaker. Good discipline and what is most important it saved my life. 11 years later I can say I work as a senior manager in a global company. I learned how to speak Japanese which was helpful to have my current job. If I had to choose between a European and US style prison system and a Japanese System I would choose the Japanese prison system any day. I invite comments or request of information about Fuchu prison conditions if requested.

trevlac
05-16-2009, 06:11 PM
I read all your comments regarding Fuchu Prison. I spend from May 1994 to December 1997, 3.5 years in Fuchu and I want to tell my story. As prisons goes, yes Fuchu is a tough place. I worked in factory 22 and made parts for the automotive industry. To say Fuchu prison is a bad place is wrong. Why? After I left Fuchu prison I have never broke any laws again. I guess that is positive. Yes it is true that Fuchu prison is like all Japanese prisons run like a military style prison. No talking, no looking around, close eyes when you wait at the hospital for treatment, not sitting against the wall in your cell, and many other silly little regulations. No real heating systems in winter and you are looked up alone in solitary confinement from 6pm until 7:30am in the morning. Prisons in Japan are there for punishment not to cuddle prisoners and are waste your time. Japanese prisons are well managed and well organized to guarantee the safety of prisoners. Once I understood the rules, I felt safe. No other prisoner has ever touched me or even tried to harass me. Yes, the guards yell at you if you break the rules and in serious cases give you SHOBASH. But guards to not carry guns nor anyone has to fear being killed in prison. To survive in Fuchu, just follow the rules. Every prisoner gets a handbook in English when the get into the prison system. I would say Fuchu prison is just a few grades higher in toughness then the Marine Corps boot camp. I agree spending 3.5 years in Marine Corp boot camp would be hard. My point is, the Japanese prison system is not cruel, it is Japanese style of punishing offenders. The system is to punish and reform the prisoner to become a better person. Besides the Fuchu Prison system has also very funny moments and a good reward system. All prisoners will start with a white badge and depending on the length on your sentence a prisoner gets promoted to a green badge and after good behavior to a red badge. If a prisoner behaves well he will be released after 55%-60% of time served. Prisoners have access to piped radio either in English or Japanese and have little TVís in there cells with are switched on at certain intervals. What have I learned spending in Fuchu? DO NOT BREAK THE LAWS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY. I am 100% cured of being a deviant lawbreaker. Good discipline and what is most important it saved my life. 11 years later I can say I work as a senior manager in a global company. I learned how to speak Japanese which was helpful to have my current job. If I had to choose between a European and US style prison system and a Japanese System I would choose the Japanese prison system any day. I invite comments or request of information about Fuchu prison conditions if requested.

I have only recently found this site and you can tell who has been in Fuchu because you can't make up a lot of these things. Family's have to understand there child has done this crime, there is not a lot you can do for them apart from support them. When you write moaning about there conditions appreciate they are suffering it and don't need reminding.
Prime example. I knew Nick Baker from when he got arrested and he kept saying about his innocence, but he was guilty and didn't want to admit the truth to himself. So when you plead not guilty and make web sites and get a lot of people involved who can do nothing then Nick suffered with the biggest sentence they could throw at him. And because him and others like him spend there time winging then there time is so much greater than if they just excepted there fate. I was no Angel I fought as far as I could and then after 280 days punishment I wised up. And then didn't get into any more trouble. You above! I can tell how long ago you was there because 55%-60% then parole. Ha Ha 85%95 now. And yes I don't want to go back there but I am still no angel so there harsh regime didn't sort me out like you. Maybe you are better than me or maybe you was then thinking like I am now. And that is 2.5 years in a Austrain easy jail making me think this way. And it is all because I want something more than pity and it is only Adam from the family. Or maybe I have just matured later than most.
My advice to everyone is live with it and tell the truth and don't exaggerate what you don't need to. Anyone like me who has been through a particular harsh regime use the anger of the place to move you on in this life and please stop dwelling in the past because there is only so much symphony people are willing to give.
Sorry have ranted on a little bit but just said it from the heart. You know for 5 years I have rarely said or was interested about anything to do with my past, but I had to right a short story for this education thing I am doing and it seems to have brought it all back. I shall post that story in a new thread.

Rachel
05-16-2009, 06:15 PM
Thanks Trevlac, I hope that you do post your story here.
There are many of us that will be interested in reading it.

Best wishes to you,

Rachel

trevlac
05-16-2009, 06:22 PM
was thinking the other night about one of the worst reasons for a punishment in Lovely Fuchu!!!!!
There was me doing 28 days isolation for not bowing to Crazy Translator, and you could imagine that as the day approached for me to have my shower and shave and go back to the wings. So there is me with 28days growth trying to hack of with a 2 month old razor and the blade fell off and went down the drain. ( anyone been there will now what I am talking about with the razors) So dried of and went to the Gestapo Razor man with the responsibility of looking after the Razor Box, and told him what happened to my Razor with hand gestures. Next thing I know the Crazy Translator was there and shouting at me again!!!!!! bearing in mind I have just done 28 days for not bowing to this little shit . So I was not really that happy where he was ecstatic. Then I am taken for the old plastic glove treatment, obviously they couldn't find anything so they had a brain wave and took me to the medical centre and hey presto X-rayed me and low and behold there was nothing again. So now they now it went down the drain and I haven't eaten it to regurgitate it later so I can escape.
So the honourable Crazy Translator kindly informs me I am under investigation for What Ever, and then I get taken to investigation cell. I am half shaved and I must of been a funny site to see. So after 3 weeks Isolation with nothing my Board sat and gave me another 14 days to reflect on a Razor Blade going down the plug hole. Such honourable people.
Just thought I would like to share this with everyone!

Rachel
05-16-2009, 06:34 PM
Blimey!!

You couldn't make that kind of thing up, even if you wanted to!!
What a farce!

Thanks for sharing, although I don't suppose any of us will ever understand what goes on in their heads........

japan8
09-16-2009, 04:06 PM
Hello Terrance I'm so glad to see you finally got freedom.I hope you and your family is okay,by the way this is me Tealow. Get back at me to catch up...

Rachel
09-19-2009, 07:11 PM
Hi there, Tealow!
Glad you found us!!

Welcome to PTO.

Rachel xx

Alan1962
05-11-2010, 09:39 AM
I'm looking for an old friend of mine incarcerated in Japan in the late 1980s. His name is Egil Larsen. He was arrested in Kansai, Japan and recieved a long prison sentence. I think it was a 25 year sentence. All I know is that it was reported in the Japan times. I haven't been able to find any info on this guy but I figure any foreigners who were imprisoned in Japan might have some info on him since there are not that many Norwegians over there.

Harry4160
01-27-2013, 10:23 AM
was thinking the other night about one of the worst reasons for a punishment in Lovely Fuchu!!!!!
There was me doing 28 days isolation for not bowing to Crazy Translator, and you could imagine that as the day approached for me to have my shower and shave and go back to the wings. So there is me with 28days growth trying to hack of with a 2 month old razor and the blade fell off and went down the drain. ( anyone been there will now what I am talking about with the razors) So dried of and went to the Gestapo Razor man with the responsibility of looking after the Razor Box, and told him what happened to my Razor with hand gestures. Next thing I know the Crazy Translator was there and shouting at me again!!!!!! bearing in mind I have just done 28 days for not bowing to this little shit . So I was not really that happy where he was ecstatic. Then I am taken for the old plastic glove treatment, obviously they couldn't find anything so they had a brain wave and took me to the medical centre and hey presto X-rayed me and low and behold there was nothing again. So now they now it went down the drain and I haven't eaten it to regurgitate it later so I can escape.
So the honourable Crazy Translator kindly informs me I am under investigation for What Ever, and then I get taken to investigation cell. I am half shaved and I must of been a funny site to see. So after 3 weeks Isolation with nothing my Board sat and gave me another 14 days to reflect on a Razor Blade going down the plug hole. Such honourable people.
Just thought I would like to share this with everyone!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

I remembered well the razor box. Every inmate have a private shaver with his prison number. One had to shave all hair from eye level down and turn left side of of face and ride side of face to the guard so you shaved properly. Then returned the shaver back to the guard to make sure is was clean and both blades of the shaver was still properly mounted on the shaver. Sorry to hear they gave you SHOBASH for losing a blade.

I still remember going from the factory to the bathhouse. In our factory we had around 80 inmates. We walked in military style formation and the guard yelled. "Itch Nie" "Itch Nie" and 80 inmates on command yelled Ichi Ni, Ichi Ni. Then arriving at the bath house we undressed on command and sit on the
floor and had to close our eyes. No talking and close eyes. Bath time was sort
of a funny time. To see 80 naked high risk inmates with nothing but soap, shaving cream and the typical Japanese mini towel (15" by 10") was sometimes amusing. The class door open and the guard would yell "Group A" and 20 inmates walk in naked. The Group B and C and D walked in. We would all sit on little plastic stools (which is standard in any Japanese bath house) and small bucket and were waiting the guard to blow the whistle and on command 80 inmates opened the faucet to start pouring water over them selves. A quick shave and quick wash .... less in 7 minute, then climb in the hot bath (Jacuzzi) for another 7 minutes to keep warm. Then the whistle blow again and all inmates climbed out of the hot bath and got inside the dressing room and got dressed. This whole exercise did not take more then 15 minutes.
Afterwards we lined up outside the bath house and made a quick roll call so the guard had all of his flock together and we all shouted "Ichi Ni, Ichi Ni" and marched in military formation back the cell block. Another thing...I hated those blue plastic slippers we had to wear. Only once you reached to red badge level, you were allowed to purchase your private brown slippers that were far more comfortable. The purchase of brown slippers was a exercise in appreciation.
One think also is to remember when you arrive in Fuchu. Fuchu prison is the the most secure and is a category A high security prison of Japan. All male western inmates with more then 3 month sentence will end up in Fuchu. The reason why is simple. Because all embassies and consulates are in situated in Tokyo. All western inmates are housed in single cell housing for the simple reason because the Japanese government do not want any problems with inmates for different countries sharing a cell as they worry they will may kill each other. What we perceive as cruel punishment living in solitary confinement is actually to keep us save within the prison system.
As mentioned before Fuchu is a category A high security prison. All Japanese inmates are multiple offenders and many are members of yakuza clans. If you are inside Fuchu always be very respectful and check the hands of any Japanese inmates and count how many fingers he has left. Less fingers higher is his standing.

johnson33445
05-16-2013, 03:56 AM
thanks alto my dear to sharing it

trihardkiwi
02-06-2015, 12:09 AM
hiya everyone,
I was just trolling our wonderful web and stumbled across this forum...
I was an inmate in Fuchu from March 2005 (though was arrested in Sept. of '04) until I was paroled in Feb. 2012. In conjunction with your custodial sentence you quite often get lumbered with a pecuniary fine imposed by Japan Customs if you break their Border Control Laws.
This can either be paid in full or worked off with additional time added to your time. A formula is worked out if you choose the latter option, which generally works out to be that for each additional day worked either 5,000 or 10,000 Yen is deducted from the fine.
However, the time you serve paying off the fine is NOT counted towards your parole, yet you can still have your parole affected if you get into trouble during this time. So in effect your custodial sentence doesn't begin until the day after you complete working off the fine, which in my case took 10 months with a 3,000,000 Yen fine at 10,000 a day.
My full sentence was seven and a half years and the 3,000,000 Yen fine (prosecution requested 10 years and 5,000,000). I was considered lucky that I got so much less than was asked for...
These were obviously not the happiest days of my life but like a lot of what I've read on here, the experience has changed my life for the better...
I now run my own NGO rescuing food from supermarkets, cafes, restaurants, bakeries etc and then we package our collected products up and hand them out to those who require them...
It used to be about me...several years of introspection can change a man and it's encouraging to see that so many of us Fuchu holiday makers have made that change...
It's not about me anymore...
you...?