View Full Version : Referred to committee on judiciary?


whisper248
06-16-2005, 11:04 AM
I am not very literate where legislative procedures are concerned, but am trying to figure things out. :confused: Is it my understanding that when a Bill is referred to the Committee on Judiciary it is only for them to investigate the Bill and decide on if the changes should or can be done according to the law? Is it then passed to someone else to make the decission? I also want to know how long it takes for this process, is it months? years? Is there a time frame involved once they receive it, or can it just die there in committee, and never be considered? Hopefully someone with this knowledge can assist me on how to actually follow a bill.
Thanks

Tuberose
06-16-2005, 06:30 PM
How a Bill Becomes a Law

When a senator or a representative introduces a bill, he or she sends it to the clerk of his house, who gives it a number and title. This is the first reading, and the bill is referred to the proper committee.

The committee may decide the bill is unwise or unnecessary and table it, thus killing it at once. Or it may decide the bill is worthwhile and hold hearings to listen to facts and opinions presented by experts and other interested persons. After members of the committee have debated the bill and perhaps offered amendments, a vote is taken; and if the vote is favorable, the bill is sent back to the floor of the house.

The clerk reads the bill sentence by sentence to the house, and this is known as the second reading. Members may then debate the bill and offer amendments. In the House of Representatives, the time for debate is limited by a cloture rule, but there is no such restriction in the Senate for cloture, where 60 votes are required. This makes possible a filibuster, in which one or more opponents hold the floor to defeat the bill.

The third reading is by title only, and the bill is put to a vote, which may be by voice or roll call, depending on the circumstances and parliamentary rules. Members who must be absent at the time but who wish to record their vote may be paired if each negative vote has a balancing affirmative one.

The bill then goes to the other house of Congress, where it may be defeated, or passed with or without amendments. If the bill is defeated, it dies. If it is passed with amendments, a joint congressional committee must be appointed by both houses to iron out the differences.

After its final passage by both houses, the bill is sent to the president. If he approves, he signs it, and the bill becomes a law. However, if he disapproves, he vetoes the bill by refusing to sign it and sending it back to the house of origin with his reasons for the veto. The objections are read and debated, and a roll-call vote is taken. If the bill receives less than a two-thirds vote, it is defeated and goes no further. But if it receives a two-thirds vote or greater, it is sent to the other house for a vote. If that house also passes it by a two-thirds vote, the president's veto is overridden, and the bill becomes a law.

Should the president desire neither to sign nor to veto the bill, he may retain it for ten days, Sundays excepted, after which time it automatically becomes a law without signature. However, if Congress has adjourned within those ten days, the bill is automatically killed, that process of indirect rejection being known as a pocket veto.


Information Please® Database, © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

This is for the Federal level but I think it's about the same at the state level. I'm glad you asked this because I've been wondering the same thing and have been sharing what I learn as part of our home schooling. Boy, have we been getting an education in the legal system this year. :mad:

Tuberose
06-16-2005, 06:47 PM
Here's the specific Michigan info. From a quick reading it looks identical.
http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/publications/HowBillBecomesLaw.pdf

whisper248
06-16-2005, 08:22 PM
Thank you Aquarian for you help here, that was a very helpful site, now if they are just looking to amend an existing bill is there a time frame that they go by to make a decision or is this just a waiting game and could take awhile? Sorry for all the questions, but i really want to follow this and know how to understand what i am reading.:confused:

Tuberose
06-16-2005, 09:24 PM
It can take a while, or just die eventually according to what problems the committee it is referred to sees with it. I've heard of bills coming back up the next year because it was never setteled in the original form. You can subscribe to notices about committee hearings. Go to www.mi.gov/Committee Subscribe.asp (http://www.mi.gov/Committee Subscribe.asp) and you can subscribe to email notices for committees of your choice. I subscribed to the Judiciary committee to be notified of hearings involving possible laws. If you're interested in money or budget issues sign up for the appropriations committee, etc.

dmpdbd
06-16-2005, 10:29 PM
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Aquarian - for some reason your link to subscribe does not work. Help!!
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witchlinblue
06-16-2005, 10:32 PM
I also really appreciate that information, Ive been struggling with the in's and out's of the procedures in America, thank you AquarianEssence !!

whisper248
06-17-2005, 05:16 AM
Thank You Aquarian, I had already signed up for the notification subscription, i just didnt really understand the process. You have been very helpful. Guess I should have been listening better in Govt Class :D

Tuberose
06-17-2005, 06:18 AM
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Aquarian - for some reason your link to subscribe does not work. Help!!
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Sorry, that one was in my email but wouldn't paste so I typed it, I though just the way it was written. Try this one: http://house.michigan.gov/committees.asp At the bottom of the page is a drop down list of all the committees also.